DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

"Your Honor," the D.A. announced, "the People will prove that East misdefended and let South make a hopeless game."

"Proceed," said the judge, and the court heard evidence.

"South took the jack of diamonds," the D.A. droned, "and let the jack of hearts ride to the queen. East returned the nine of diamonds: six, deuce, ace. South then led a club to his king and lost another heart finesse to the king; but East led another diamond, and South claimed an overtrick. Clearly, East must shift to spades at trick six."

Ace of Spades

"Couldn't South hold Q-J-6 in diamonds," the judge inquired, "plus the ace of spades?"

"Not likely," the D.A. responded. "Then he'd have at least 15 points. East's best chance was to play West for the top spades."

Would you convict East?

Convict West----for subjecting his partner to a guess. On the second diamond, West should follow with the queen, denying possession of the king. East will then know to lead a spade when he wins the second heart.

South dealer

Both sides vulnerable

NORTH

{spade} J 7 5

{heart} A 10 8 6 4

{diamond} A 10

{club} Q 10 6

WEST

{spade} A K 10

{heart} 7 3 2

{diamond} Q 8 4 3 2

{club} 9 8

EAST

{spade} Q 8 2

{heart} K Q 5

{diamond} 9 7 5

{club} 7 5 3 2

SOUTH

{spade} 9 6 4 3

{heart} J 9

{diamond} K J 6

{club} A K J 4

South

1 {club}

Pass

West

Pass

3 NT

North

1 {heart}

All pass

East

Pass

Opening lead--{diamond} 3

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