Advertisement

Military deaths

The Defense Department last week identified the following American military personnel killed in Afghanistan and Iraq:

David K. Cooper, 25, of Williamsburg, Ky.; sergeant, Army. Cooper died Wednesday in Baghdad of injuries suffered when his unit was attacked with small-arms fire while on foot patrol in Iraq’s Qadisiya province, south of the capital. He was assigned to the Forward Support Company, 4th Battalion, 42nd Field Artillery, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division at Ft. Hood, Texas.

Michael L. Gonzalez, 20, of Spotswood, N.J.; specialist, Army Reserve. Gonzalez was killed Thursday when an improvised explosive device detonated near him in Baghdad. He was assigned to the 340th Military Police Company at Ft. Totten, N.Y.

Tan Q. Ngo, 20, of Beaverton, Ore.; private first class, Army. Ngo died Wednesday in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when his unit was attacked with rocket-propelled grenades and small-arms fire in Zabol province, south of Kabul. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment in Hohenfels, Germany.

Advertisement

David L. Paquet, 26, of Rising Sun, Md.; staff sergeant, Army. Paquet collapsed and died of undetermined causes Aug. 20 at Combat Outpost Vegas in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, east of Kabul. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division at Ft. Hood, Texas.

Brian E. Studer, 28, of Ramsey, Minn.; staff sergeant, Army. Studer was killed Aug. 22 when an improvised explosive device detonated while he was trying to disarm it in Ghazni, Afghanistan, southwest of Kabul. He was assigned to the 720th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company, 28th Transportation Battalion, 18th Military Police Brigade in Mannheim, Germany.

--

Sources: Department of Defense, Times staff reports and the Associated Press

Advertisement

--

War casualties

Total U.S. deaths*:

* In and around Iraq**: 4,149

Advertisement

* In and around Afghanistan***: 513

* Other locations***: 65

*Includes military and Department of Defense-employed civilian personnel killed in action and in nonhostile circumstances.

**As of Friday

Advertisement

***As of Aug. 23

Source: Department of Defense


Advertisement