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Venice modern comes with two times the design pedigree

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A Venice home reimagined by noted local architects David Hertz and Charles Ward is for sale in Venice at $4.125 million.
(Brandon Arant)

A collaborative effort by noted local architects David Hertz and Charles Ward is for sale in Venice at $4.125 million.

The modern two-story was completely reimagined by the two architects and features raw elements such as polished concrete floors, steel railings and expanses of glass.

On the ground floor, a chef’s kitchen outfitted with a four-seat bar sits above a step-down living room with a fireplace. Modern fixtures hang from exposed rafters in the dining room, which looks onto a garden courtyard through wall-to-wall windows.

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Upstairs is a family room, two bedroom and three bathrooms. The master suite has a walk-out balcony.

Wood-decking sits level with a blue-tiled swimming pool and spa in the backyard. The roughly 5,200-square-foot lot also holds a pool house, which has its own rooftop deck, and an attached two-car garage.

The property last sold six year ago for $2.95 million, records show. In February, based on 16 sales, the median sale price for single-family homes in Venice was $1.8 million, up 7.6% year over year, according to CoreLogic.

Kerry Ann Sullivan and Tami Pardee of Halton Pardee and Partners are the listing agents.

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neal.leitereg@latimes.com

Twitter: @LATHotProperty

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