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L.A.’s most expensive place to live boils down to how many bedrooms you need

Malibu is the most expensive city in Los Angeles County to buy a one-bedroom home, according to a new report.
(Noaki Schwartz / Associated Press)

Pinpointing the most expensive city in L.A. could look much different for a bachelor than for a family of five, says a new report from PropertyShark.

Based on the real estate website’s survey of housing data over the last six years, in terms of median price per square foot, someone searching for a one-bedroom in Beverly Hills in 2017 could get a better deal than they would in Bellflower, Topanga or Redondo Beach.

According to the data, based on the median price of $1,719 per square foot, Malibu is by far the most expensive city to buy a one-bedroom home.

Hermosa Beach ranked at a distant second, with a median of $1,009 per square foot, and Santa Monica rounded out the top three at $878. Beverly Hills, at $592 per square foot, ranked ninth on the list.

For a family, however, the 90210 still ranks as the most expensive city in L.A. County. The median price per square foot for a four-bedroom home in Beverly Hills is $1,195.

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West Hollywood costs $976 per square foot, and in Santa Monica the median for four-bedroom homes is $947. Malibu ranked fourth at $902 per square foot.

Bel-Air, among the priciest and wealthiest cities in the country, failed to make the list due to limited housing inventory.

For those in the market for a deal, Lancaster ranked as the cheapest city in the county for both one-bedroom and four-bedroom homes.

A one-bedroom in the Antelope Valley city has a median price of $195 per square foot; for a four-bedroom home, it’s $134.

jack.flemming@latimes.com

Twitter: @jflem94

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