Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights
6 Images

Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights holds onto a rural vibe in the midst of urbanization

Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights

By 1919, the 3,500 acres that would become La Habra Heights belonged to developer Edwin G. Hart. It was Hart who brought water to the canyon and who marketed the area as the “Second Beverly Hills.” During his guidance, the community gained a golf course, became a center of avocado farming and established an improvement association that sought to protect the semi-rural character of the Heights.

 

 

 

 (Jesse Goddard / For The Times)
Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights

The county Planning Commission passed zoning rules in 1949 that set the minimum size of all lots at one acre, while allowing agricultural uses to continue.

 

 (Jesse Goddard / For The Times)
Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights

The neighborhood has maintained its rural vibe thanks to its large lots and lack of streetlights and sidewalks.

 

 (Jesse Goddard / For The Times)
Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights

La Habra Heights may be surrounded by urban sprawl, but avocados still grow on many of its hillsides, and the city hosts an annual avocado festival.

 

 (Jesse Goddard / For The Times)
Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights

Two of the main attractions are privacy and space.

 

 

 (Jesse Goddard / For The Times)
Neighborhood Spotlight | La Habra Heights

Object preview

Whether you like to experience the joys of nature on foot or from the saddle of a horse, the hills of La Habra Heights are criss-crossed with scenic trails.

 

 

 

 (Jesse Goddard / For The Times)
1/6