The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, home to a notable collection of historical fashions, is giving the clothing a chance to do what it was made to do: circulate in public. A sampling from that collection will be on view when the museum’s Lynda and Stewart Resnick Exhibition Pavilion opens Oct. 2. Among the dazzlers of “Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail 1700-1915" is this dress from about 1845. It belonged to Queen Maria II of Portugal.
18 Images

Photos: ‘Fashioning Fashion’ exhibition at LACMA

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, home to a notable collection of historical fashions, is giving the clothing a chance to do what it was made to do: circulate in public. A sampling from that collection will be on view when the museum’s Lynda and Stewart Resnick Exhibition Pavilion opens Oct. 2. Among the dazzlers of “Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail 1700-1915" is this dress from about 1845. It belonged to Queen Maria II of Portugal. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
This vest from France during its revolutionary period, about 1789-94, appears to have been an early form of political-slogan gear. It is embroidered phrases that read, “The habit does not make the monk” and “Shame upon him who thinks evil of it.” (Museum Associates / LACMA)
French designer Paul Poiret came up with this turban in 1911 for an Arabian nights themed ball. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
Today’s rock goddesses are known to strut around the concert stage in these. But in England in about 1900, this was an undergarment: a corset. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
The 19th century’s elaborate covering up and modification of women’s bodies began to give way, in the vision of such designers as France’s Paul Poiret, to a more diaphanous silhouette. This silk dress dates from 1909-10. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
A bustle modifies the profile of this European dress from about 1885. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
Christian Louboutin, eat your heart out. A pair of leather fetish boots from Europe, about 1900. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
European men were peacocks in the 18th and 19th centuries, but in the early 20th century, the look changed to sober businessman’s gray, such as this example from London in 1911, and has remained largely unchanged ever since. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
Silk, velvet and satin provide the sumptuousness of this gentleman’s ensemble from France in about 1755. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
Silk, satin and sheer luxury in a dress from England in about 1885. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
The pieces in the show are one of a kind and originally would have been worn by wealthy owners. This complexly woven and embroidered detail is on a European dress from about 1795. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
Leather and metal are components of a corset from England, about 1900. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
A fashionable lady in about 1885 might have been seen in this France-made taffeta dress. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
It took an architecture of undergarments to create the silhouette of this dress from England in 1765. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
This mantle, from about 1891, was envisioned by French designer Emile Pingat. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
A dress from England, about 1830. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
A wool coat from Scotland, about 1845. (© 2010 Museum Associates / LACMA)
Detail of coat from Scotland, 1945. “Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail, 1700-1915" continues through March 6, 2011. (Museum Associates / LACMA)
1/18