Jim Rash’s garden
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‘Community’ garden: Jim Rash at home

Jim Rash’s garden
By Lisa Boone
Jim Rash kicks back in the frontyard of his West L.A. house, where the new plant palette includes low-water agave, echeveria and a vibrant orange ice plant that serves as ground cover -- a virtually no-maintenance landscape for a man in demand. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
Landscape architect Dale Newman started in the front with a nod to Rash’s boisterous side. A redwood-framed garden gate and fence are made with orange plexiglass from Solter Plastics. “They are really interesting, and you can see through them,” Newman said of the panels, whose color was chosen to offset the gunmetal gray exterior of the house. “It gives the frontyard a crazy glow. In the daytime, the sun shines through them and gives an unusual cast over the plants.” (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
Where a meager lawn once stood, Newman installed saw-cut colored concrete pavers, expanding Rash’s living area beyond the 1,100-square-foot house. “The gardens make the living spaces feel so much larger,” Rash said. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
The color of the garden gate and front ground cover is echoed in the mailbox from Modern Mailboxes(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
The green and purple of an aeonium rosette. The purple also appears in smoke bush used as a hedge. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
A bee buzzes the yellow flowers of Aeonium arboretum in the frontyard. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
More orange and yellow in the form of pincushion flowers, which can provide long-lasting color as cut flowers too. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
In the backyard, Newman edited and reorganized what was already there. Running black bamboo that had taken over the yard was replanted along the side yard. A fire pit was added, creating another outdoor area that can accommodate overflow guests when Rash entertains. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
The fern pine planted as a hedge in back will fill in over time. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
Gazanias provide more blasts of orange in the backyard. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
They make their point: Cordyline atropurpurea(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
A potted cordyline in a different hue sits on the back patio. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
Even a common eyesore -- the neighbor’s garage wall -- got a little irreverence. “It was screaming for something,” Newman said, so it was painted brown to help it disappear, then adorned with seven circular mirrors. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
Jim Rash’s garden
Rash, at his front gate: “I wanted something different. I wanted a sense of enclosure but not a fence. It feels like you’re enclosed when in fact it is an open space.” The various elements of the new garden add up to a low-maintenance retreat for a man still fielding questions about his Angelina thigh thrust at the Oscars. Rash just smiles. “Everyone knows I was just having fun.” Now the same can be said of his garden. Full article.

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