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Why you need to watch ‘Making It,’ the new Nick Offerman, Amy Poehler DIY competition

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Los Angeles master maker Robert Mahar tackles a craft challenge in “Making It,” a reality show hosted by Nick Offerman and Amy Poehler that debuts July 31 on NBC.
(Paul Drinkwater/NBC)

Craft lovers are going to DIY for “Making It,” a craft contest styled after the good-natured British television baking competition “The Great British Bake Off.”

Hosted and executive produced by “Parks and Recreation” costars Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman, the reality show will spotlight eight makers from across the country, including Los Angeles felt artist Billy Kheel and master crafter Robert Mahar.

Each week, contestants will tackle two different challenges using unusual materials, culminating in a “craft off” overseen by judges Simon Doonan of Barneys, Dayna Isom Johnson of Etsy, Poehler and Offerman, who has a woodshop in East Los Angeles.

In press materials, NBC promised to emphasize friendly camaraderie over cutthroat competition, with “heartfelt encouragement, guidance and plenty of laughs,” courtesy of hosts Poehler and Offerman. Just think of it as “The Great British Bake Off” — where contestants were known to encourage one another in the process — with felt and wood instead of Swiss rolls and strudel.

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“Making It”

When: 10 p.m. Tuesdays on NBC, beginning July 31.

Info: nbc.com/making-it

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lisa.boone@latimes.com | Twitter: @lisaboone19

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lisa.boone@latimes.com

Twitter: @lisaboone19

For an easy way to follow the L.A. scene, bookmark L.A. at Home and join us on our Facebook page for home design, Twitter and Pinterest.

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