Tiny houses
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‘Tiny Houses’

Tiny houses
By Audrey Davidow

Mimi Zeiger’s new book, “Tiny Houses,” from Rizzoli (www.rizzoliusa.com), couldn’t ask for better timing. Between the green living boom and the nation’s financial gloom, the notion of downsizing - getting more out of living with less - resonates loudly. None of the homes featured in Zeiger’s book is larger than 1,000 square feet. Shown here: the cover image of Delta Shelter, a steel and glass structure in Mazama, Wash., designed by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects(Tim Bies)
Tiny houses
Zeiger’s compilation is everything you’d expect from a coffee table book: top-notch photography and easy-to-digest captions. It offers 36 examples of high design on a diminutive scale — uncluttered spaces fit for Spartan lives. Innovation abounds. The Delta Shelter, for example, has 18-foot-tall shutters that roll down over expanses of glass to protect against extreme weather. (Tim Bies)
Tiny houses
The book opens in New Orleans, where BILD Design created a two-story apartment building with a reflective metal exterior. Though small in stature, the place is hard to miss amid the traditional shotgun houses of the uptown neighborhood. This project was finished just as Hurricane Katrina hit; fortunately, given the threat of flooding, the architects had designed it to sit off the ground. Zeiger also points out the implications for urban development. “With two living units stacked on top of each other, the design rethinks affordable housing in New Orleans,” she writes, “proposing a denser building type.” (Catherine Ledner)
Tiny houses
The exterior of the Snowboarders Cottage, perched on a Czech ski slope, is titanium-zinc. The design is by Ivan Kroupa Architects(Martin Rezabeck, Libor Levbav, Ivan Kroupa)
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Architect Andreas Wenning called his 119-square-foot steel-framed tree house Between Magnolia and Pine. It’s near Osnabruck, Germany. (Andreas Wenning)
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Celebrated Paris designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec were commissioned to create this live-work houseboat on the Seine. The 75-foot-long boat is wrapped in aluminum skin and was a collaboration with architects Jean-Marie Finot and Denis Daversin. (Paul Tahon, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec)
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The Nomad Home by Gerold Peham. ()
Tiny houses
The Nomad Home is assembled from prefabricated modules, including a bedroom, bathroom and kitchen. Extra rooms, a garage and a terrace are add-ons. ()
Tiny houses
The designs showcased in the book are thoughtful applications of sustainable living, but don’t expect to walk away with concepts that you can apply on your own turf. Exhibit A: Lucky Drops, designed by Atelier Tekuto. It’s build on a site that’s just 10 feet wide at street level. The steel skeleton and reinforced plastic skin are meant to emulate a traditional Japanese paper lantern. Visitors enter the 96-foot-long foyer, and steps lead down to a living area, kitchen and bathroom below grade, all illuminated by natural light from above. (Makota Yoshida)
Tiny houses
Another extreme high-concept design ditches the concept of living in a home altogether. The Walden by Nils Holger Moormann is essentially a 12.5-by-3-foot toolbox outfitted with a fire cauldron, gardening tools, a picnic table, even a retractable awning — all that one would need to live the simple life outdoors. The ladder leads to a cushioned open-air platform for sleeping. (Jager & Jager)
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The Walden was inspired by Henry David Thoreau’s story of the simple life. (Jager & Jager)
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Michael Jantzen’s M-House, previously featured in the Home section, is a prefabricated flat-pack structure that yields a 500-square-foot interior. (Michael Jantzen / www.humanshelter.org)
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The Box House in New South Wales, Australia, was designed by Neeson Murcutt Architects(Brett Boardman)
Tiny houses
Completed in eight days by Catholic University of America students, the Floating Eco Lodge is an ironwood structure set atop a balsa raft. The thatch roof allows some natural light inside but blocks the most intense rays and heat. The pitched roof also creates a chimney effect, drawing hot air out of the 322-square-foot space inside. (Travis L. Price III)
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Boxhome in Oslo, Norway, designed by Sami Rintala, Dagur Eggertsson, John Roger Holte and Julian Fors. (Sami Rintala)
Tiny houses
“Tiny Houses” doesn’t offer how-to tips. Instead, the author prompts readers to reexamine their ecological footprint and think about living smaller. Take the Micro Compact Home by Horden Cherry Lee Architects with Haack Hoepfner Architects. The 76-square-foot aluminum cube has two double beds, a dining table, what Zeiger says is a “well-equipped kitchen,” a toilet, a shower and, allegedly, leftover room for storage. (Sascha Kletzsch)
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