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More eye candy from the 2008 Milan furniture fair

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Earlier, the Home section posted its first gallery of designs from the 2008 Salone Internazionale del Mobile, better known as the Milan furniture fair. Here we present additional furnishings to turn heads at the Italian show, considered to be the most important home design event in the world. Among the displays: this black and white tile mosaic of a woman’s face on the facade of an armoire. The hefty brass handle pays homage to 1950s designer Tommi Parzinger. (Franco Forci / For The Times)
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The show, which included 2,500 exhibitors unveiling their latest collections, included a section with more traditional designs or period looks. RS Valeo created a delightful 1970s-disco-meets-1920s-Deco lighting fixture composed of metal and mirrored discs illuminated by sleek metal-cased bulbs. A party for your powder room? (David A. Keeps / Los Angeles Times)
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Architect Zaha Hadid exhibited one of her tables for Vitra Edition at La Triennale di Milano museum. (David A. Keeps / Los Angeles Times)
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Paola Navone, artistic director of Gervasoni, created an outdoor furnishings collection for Emu. The powder-coated Ivy line contains blocky chairs and tables, including one inset with tiles that give the patio an instant koi pond. (Franco Forci / For The Times)
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From the office of Pianeta Sudest, architect Valentina Audrito conjures fantasy lighting and flooring: The oversized capiz shell chandelier is called Living in the Clouds, and the egg-shaped ceramic floor lamp is called Turn Me On. The carpeting, I Like the Grass, is composed of pieces of green rattan encased in an aluminum frame and cushioned with recycled sponge. (Pianeta Sudest)
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Paul Loebach uses computer numeric controlled (better known as CNC) programming and machinery to achieve modern furniture with a dash of American Colonial detailing. His booth at the Satellite exhibition featured a set of green nesting tables, a tapering ladder with lathed rungs, a wooden framed half-mirror, a three-legged table with vases that nestle into the tabletop, an elaborately curved armchair and a loopy shelf with a seriously twisted candlestick. (Paul Loebach)
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Industrial designer Arik Levy fashioned these tubes for the Italian ceramics firm Bitossi(Bitossi Ceramiche)
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The Gato’s body is made from a wheel-thrown tube and is embossed with Bitossi’s trademark Rimini pattern. The piece is one of Bitossi’s new limited reissues of work by Aldo Londi, who created Modernist pottery and figural sculpture from the 1950s to the 1970s. (Bitossi Ceramiche)
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Lithuanian designer Mantas Lataitis earned a space at the Satellite exhibition after winning first place in a Moscow design competition. His Pico coffee table is available in triangular and square configurations, with tapered legs and hidden hinges that allows the piece to be folded for easy moving and storage. (Mantas Lataiti)
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Designed by Pininfarina for Riva 1920, this chaise is created from solid wood finished with natural oils and waxes. With every purchase: a seedling to plant in your yard. (Franco Forci / For The Times)
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Some designers at the Milan show referenced Belgian surrealist René Magritte. The Italian firm Estel offered an unusual pouf created from two symbols from Magritte’s visual vocabulary: a green apple and a bowler hat. In back: the Rialto shelving unit in purple and powder blue. (Franco Forci / For The Times)
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Oy. Proof that not everything in Milan shines in a good way: this roll-arm sofa from Gregori. It’s gilded, tufted, bedazzled in a checkerboard pattern and studded with giant nails that even a heavy metal rocker might deem excessive. Note how the coordinating bed and cabinet pull the whole look together! (Gregori)
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