Edible alternatives
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‘Beautiful Edible Garden’: A fruitful kind of ornamentation

Edible alternatives
The magnolia tree is known for its beautiful flowers, but for an alternative you might want to consider a Fuyu persimmon tree, whose bright orange fruit can brighten the garden a different way.  (Arno Burgi / EPA; Ten Speed Press)
Edible alternatives
The ubiquitous boxwood hedge, far left, can be replaced by different kinds of food-producing plants. The authors of “The Beautiful Edible Garden” suggest two alternatives: Chinotto (Citrus myrtifolia, also called the myrtle-leafed orange), center, or a blueberry bush (the cultivar pictured here is Sunshine Blue).  (Carole Drake / Getty Images; Jill Rizzo; Debra Prinzing)
Edible alternatives
Privet, the common hedge plant, left, is popular as a privacy screen between yards. An edible alternative: culinary bay, whose leaves are dense enough to create privacy and also can be used in cooking. (Janet Seaton / Getty Images; Ten Speed Press)
‘The Beautiful Edible Garden’
Stefani Bittner and Leslie Bennett’s book, “The Beautiful Edible Garden,” has ideas on how to integrate food plants into a traditional ornamental garden. (Ten Speed Press)
Edible alternatives
Pittosporum tenuifolium is popular for its airy habit, but Chilean guava can be a nice alternative — while providing fruit and seasonal flowers. (Carole Drake / Getty Images; Leslie Bennett)
Edible alternatives
Lamb’s ear, left, is a popular groundcover, beloved for its silver-green sheen and textured foliage. For an edible alternative, consider some types of sage. Pictured here: Berggarten sage. (Gerry Broome / Associated Press; Ten Speed Press)
Edible alternatives
Dymondia, left, is often used as a low-water groundcover or planting between pavers. An easy substitute is oregano; the cultivar White Anniversary is shown at right. (Spencer Weiner / Los Angeles Times; Stefani Bittner)
Authors Stefani Bittner and Leslie Bennett
“Your garden should provide you with a harvest of food and flowers,” says Stefani Bittner, left, pictured with her co-author, Leslie Bennett. “It should be beautiful all seasons.”  (David Fenton / Ten Speed Press)
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