Boojum
13 Images

A Pasadena Craftsman’s native plant garden

Boojum
A boojum tree, center, rises above night-blooming cereus.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Bladderpod
The yellow flowers of the bladderpod, a California native, play off the gray-green foliage.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Woolly blue curls
The purple spires of native wooly blue curls (Trichostema lanatum) rise from Debe Loxton’s garden.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Bush poppy
The native island bush poppy, sometimes called Channel Island bush poppy, is a shrubby perennial with sunny spring flowers.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
More poppies, more edibles
More poppies are beginning to bloom around Debe Loxton’s young tomato plants. The orange flowers will draw pollinators to the garden’s vegetable plants.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Natives and edibles
California poppies draw beneficial insects to Debe Loxton’s vegetable garden, where the Swiss chard glows in the afternoon sun.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Baby blue eyes
The petite blooms of baby blue eyes.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Shade in the making
Candy cane morning glory, a California native plant that can work as a green fence or drought-tolerant ground cover, climbs the posts of a shade structure. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Lawn alternative
The view from the front porch of Debe Loxton and Martha Clark’s Pasadena house, where California natives and other drought-tolerant plantings thrive in the place of traditional turf.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Ceanothus
Ceanothus -- that stalwart of California native gardens -- lines the walkway of the Loxton-Clark home. This particular variety is Yankee Point, with low-growing true-green leaves and petite blue flowers.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Tree mallow
The shrub is sometimes called malva rosa. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Debe Loxton
Debe Loxton pictured in her Pasadena garden, one of 42 to be featured in the annual Theodore Payne garden tour.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Cleveland sage
Like many other California natives, Cleveland sage is a favorite of bees and hummingbirds.  (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
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