Grounded
16 Images

Grounded

Claude Bomham puts the finishing touches on a Boeing 717, the smallest airliner in the company’s fleet, at the Long Beach plant in September 2004. Boeing announced it would end production of the 717. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
In a 2000 photo, a Boeing 717 moves along an assembly line at Boeing’s Long Beach plant. (Lawrence K. Ho / LAT)
The lighted sign atop Boeing’s 717 plant in Long Beach remind of its earlier days as the home of Douglas Aircraft’s commercial airliner production. (AP)
A bell is rung when new orders come in at Boeing’s plant in Long Beach. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
A 717 cockpit is assembled at the Long Beach facility. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
The body of a 717 begins its journey down the assembly line. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
A Boeing 717 aircraft on the assembly line. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
One of the 717’s two jet engines is exposed during assembly. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
Mechanic Linda Foster seals the wingtip of a 717 aircraft on the assembly line. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
Workers detail a freshly painted 717 aircraft. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
Mechanic David Arends works on the interior of a 717. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
Workers consult in front of new airplane seats at Boeing’s Long Beach plant. (Lawrence K. Ho / LAT)
A worker puts finishing touches on a freshly painted AirTran 717 aircraft. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
Mike Fowler works on the detailing of a 717 aircraft. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
Terry Lazar puts finishing touches on a 717’s paint job. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
The Boeing 717-200, shown in a company drawing, was introduced in 1998, following the Boeing-McDonnell Douglas merger, as the renamed version of the McDonnell Douglas MD-95. (Boeing / AP)
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