In the Wudang Mountain Range
7 Images

The Magic of Wudang

In the Wudang Mountain Range
His music floating into the valley below, Taoist apprentice Zheng Sui Cheng plays a flute in a temple on 5,287-foot Tianzhu, or “pillar to hold up heaven,” one of the 72 peaks in the Wudang mountain range. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
Taoist priest on Tianzhu Peak
A priest in Wudang, which for hundreds of years has been the world’s largest Taoist complex. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
Nanyan Temple
Nanyan Temple is an intricate complex of wood buildings that cling to the side of a cliff. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
Purple Cloud Temple
The entrance courtyard of six-century-old Purple Cloud Temple, an outstanding example of Ming Dynasty architecture at the foot of Wudang’s Zhanqi Peak. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
A Taoist worshiper kneels before Golden Hall on Tianzhu Peak.
A Taoist worshiper kneels before Golden Hall on Tianzhu Peak, built entirely of gilded copper in 1416. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
Martial arts students practice their moves at a Wudang academy.
Martial arts students practice their moves at a Wudang academy. The area has been a center of such disciplines since the 15th century. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
Wudang Mountain Scenic Area
On Tianzhu, the highest summit in the Wudang Mountain Scenic Area, couples leave keyless locks to symbolize the eternity of their bond. (BRYAN CHAN / Los Angeles Times)
1/7