2013 Nissan GT-R
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2013 Nissan GT-R

2013 Nissan GT-R
The 2013 Nissan GT-R gets 545 horsepower and 463 pound-feet of torque coming from a twin-turbocharged, 3.8-liter V-6 engine mated to a six-speed, dual-clutch transmission with magnesium paddle shifters. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
The base 2013 GT-R is $97,820. Add the four-stage Super Silver paint you see here and it’s $100,820. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
Stopping duties are handled by massive Brembo brakes; up front they have six piston calipers grabbing 15.35-inch cross-drilled rotors and in the back, four-piston calipers grab 15-inch rotors. These brakes are wrapped with 20-inch forged aluminum wheels. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
Since the 530 horsepower on the 2012 GT-R was obviously a woefully inadequate number, Nissan figured 545 had a nice ring to it for 2013. This is achieved via engine modifications like improved intake efficiency, a larger intake duct for the turbos’ intercooler and better exhaust efficiency. Nissan says other changes include more refined transmission shifts and a retuned suspension. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
As with previous GT-R’s, the personality on this one is tunable, via a trio of buttons on the dashboard. One controls the Bilstein shocks with Normal, Comfort and ‘R’ modes; another handles the transmission shift mapping with Normal and ‘R’ modes; and a third dials up the stability control with Normal, ‘R’ and Off. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
Despite retuning the suspension, there’s almost no noticeable difference in compliance between the 2012 and the 2013 versions. It’s still stiffer than Dom Draper’s NyQuil even in ‘Comfort’ mode, which gets a bit tedious in daily driving. But at least the seats help as they’re nicely bolstered and padded. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
Around town, much of the driving experience is loud and visceral with plenty of sound coming into the cabin. Everything from the wind noise leaking through the frameless doors; to the transmission rattling about in low gear or at idle; to the sound of errant pebbles being flicked into the wheel wells, it all serves as a constant reminder that this car is not here to coddle you. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
this car grips like very few machines can and to match its point-and-shoot brutal purity you’d have to spend several times the GT-R’s $100,000 asking price. With more electronics than an entire arcade working to keep you moving forward, ever forward as fast as possible, the car isn’t so much forgiving as it is willing to just cover up your mistakes. It’s a slightly surreal yet endlessly thrilling experience to suddenly worry much less about grip and traction than you are thinking about just keeping your right foot planted. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
The GT-R’s look is as raw as its drive; that 21st-century sound is paired with a 21-st century look heavy on creases, folds and angles. The brash statement made by the GTR’s rear is capped off with quad tailpipes that look like they were ripped out of France’s Organ of St. Sulpice. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
2013 Nissan GT-R
Despite the unapologetic nature of the GT-R, it’s hard to argue with the sheer value the car presents. Where the GT-R trumps competitors like the Corvette or Porsche 911 is how it is the only one of the three that has nearly all of the capabilities and physicality of a high-end supercar. For better or worse. (David Undercoffler / Los Angeles Times)
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