Stainless steel
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The weather beaters

Stainless steel
Pros: Tubular construction makes this 2003 Cologne Furniture Fair-winning lounge chair a featherweight, plus the webbed polypropylene nodes on the seat conform to the body.

Cons: Manufacturer recommends a once-yearly application of Minwax to protect the metal frame. Accupunto chair by DellaRobbia, $399 from Blueprint, Los Angeles, (323) 653-2439. ()
Painted wood
Pros: The classic Adirondack receives a colorful and shapely update in weather-resistant mahogany with a durable marine enamel.

Cons: Somewhat heavy, many wood chairs also may require retightening when they swell or shrink in changing weather conditions. Round-back chair, $450, from www.archiesisland.com, (800) 486-1183. ()
Galvanized steel
Pros: Powder-coated heavy-gauge steel makes this old-fashioned glider sturdy. Its pierced back provides ventilation.

Cons: At nearly 70 pounds, it’s not for constant furniture rearrangers. On some metal chairs, a powder-coated finish may require touch-ups and oil to avoid rust around moving parts. Grandin Road gliding chair, $299, from www.frontgate.com, (800) 491-5194. ()
Teak
Pros: Warm and sensual, the wood on this hand-carved, hand-joined bench/side table ages to a silvery gray.

Cons: Without a sealer, teak should be treated with linseed oil at least once a year. Larger pieces made from solid teak can be weighty. X Bench, $992, available to the trade from David Sutherland, Pacific Design Center, (310) 360-1777. ()
Tzalam
Pros: Also known as Mexican nogal, the tropical hardwood of this chaise for two has a rich reddish tone that weathers more slowly than teak.

Cons: As dense as it is durable, this double-wide may weigh more than you do — and would appreciate a linseed oil rubdown in summer. Tzalam chaise, $1,950, from Avitatt, San Diego, (619) 338-8245. ()
Iron and travertine
Pros: This sculptural hexagonal table in rust-finished cast iron with marble top will last several lifetimes.

Cons: Manufacturer needs to seal the base with a marine varnish for outdoor use. Olympic weightlifting skills required to move solo. Caryatid VI iron table with travertine top, $5,000 from Pierce Martin, Los Angeles, (310) 652-0299. ()
Sunbrella
Pros: Powder-coating protects the iron base, and the all-weather Sunbrella shade is fade-resistant. Additional safety features include sealed circuitry and a Teflon-coated bulb.

Cons: Although UL rated for outdoor use, this outdoor lamp is only recommended for covered areas. Villa Terrace outdoor floor lamp, $379, from www.frontgate.com, (888) 263-9850. ()
Aluminum
Pros: This elegant Chinese Chippendale chair is made of tubular aluminum that is extremely lightweight and patinated with a celadon finish that prevents corrosion.

Cons: By contrast, many other aluminum pieces are solid-cast furniture, making them hard to move. Armchair, $695, available to the trade from Bruce Eicher, West Hollywood, (310) 657-4630. (Eric Boyd / LAT)
Polyethylene
Pros: Lighter than its wood counterparts, this colorfast molded version of a classic English garden bench can be hosed down and has a sloping seat for water runoff.

Cons: Although not shiny like cheap resin furniture, polyethylene is still plastic. Giulietta Bench, $795, from www.conran.com, (866) 755-9079. ()
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