Eye-grabbing
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This week in Travel

Eye-grabbing
A riot of colors and patterns greets the shopper entering a fabric store in Myanmar. Visitors to other shops are tempted by blankets, clothing, kitchen utensils, jewelry and beautiful Burmese lacquerware. (Patricia Woeber)
The shops await
The stairs up the steep bank of the Mekong River lead to a shopping village on Don Sao Island in Laos. Just yards away, large souvenir stalls, built of wood and bamboo with straw roofs, overflow with items for sale. (Patricia Woeber)
On the market
The market in the town of Thakilek in Myanmar, borders Mae Sai, Thailand. (Patricia Woeber)
SIT BACK, RELAX
The Oaks is one of three cottages on the 550-acre Anderson Valley guest ranch. The cottage features satellite TV and a high-end sound system, although guests might just prefer a good book and a valley view. (Craig Nakano / LAT)
ARTIFACT AND ART
A Pacific Northwest totem graces the Sun House in Ukiah, the home of painter Grace Carpenter Hudson and her husband, John. (Craig Nakano / LAT)
Sign of the times
Street signs in Ukiah. (Craig Nakano / LAT)
Meditation hall
City of Ten Thousand Buddhas, a Buddhist training center that takes its name from the main meditation hall. (Patricia Woeber)
Family life
The Addo Elephant National Park herd has never been culled, and the animals are not suspicious of humans. (R. Paul Herman)
Big play
Elephants play on top of a dirt mound in Addo Elephant National Park. (R. Paul Herman)
Mother and child
Babies and mothers display loving relationships in Addo Elephant National Park. (Gayle Keck)
Grounded
Flightless Dung Beetles are among the smaller wildlife in Addo Elephant National Park. (R. Paul Herman)
On the road again
A family of elephants moves across the landscape creating road hazards. (R. Paul Herman)
King of the hill
A lion rests in Addo. Six lions have recently been introduced into the park; antelope and buffalo also live there. ()
BREAKFAST IS SERVED:
Boca Raton Resort guests enjoy a buffet in the Cathedral room. The Florida resort includes five hotels spread over 356 acres. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
LANDMARK:
In Coral Gables, the Biltmore, built in 1926, served as a WWII military hospital, fell into disrepair, then was resurrected after a grass-roots campaign. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
MUSEUM AND GARDENS
James Deering had Vizcaya, in Miami, built between 1914 and 1916. The formal gardens are a fantasy of fountains and pools. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
OPULENT:
Standard Oil’s Henry Flagler and family wintered at Whitehall, now the Flagler Museum, in Palm Beach. The library served as a reception area. (Flagler Museum)
Good break
Bill Harbach, retired TV producer and Croquet Hall of Fame player, practices croquet at The Breakers. The hotel is located on 140 acres along the Atlantic Ocean. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
Made in the shade
A line of pillars shades the walkway to the ocean, pools and resturants at The Breakers. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
The deep end
Kids swim in the largest hotel pool in the continental United States. The Biltmore pool holds 700,000 gallons of water and measures 23,000 sq feet. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
Sweet
Fruit tarts at a luncheon at the Biltmore at Coral Gables. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
Tea for two
The tea house, inspired by a pavilion at Versailles, France, has a huge stone barge with Alexander Calder sculptures anchored in the bay. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
Building
James Deering, a bachelor, devoted the years 1914-16 to building Vizcaya, traveling to Europe with his designer to bring home furniture, doors and fireplaces. (Tom Ervin / For the Times)
Gilded Age
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