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A BROKEN CONTRACT: AFTER THE UFW

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New mobile homes stand where a dilapidated farm labor complex once was in Pajaro, Calif. Sabino Lopez, a former farmworker who worked with Eliseo Medina, is deputy director of the Salinas-based Center for Community Advocacy, the nonprofit firm behind the project. (Don Bartletti / LAT)
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Sabino Lopez looks out from a tiny apartment in Gonzales, Calif., where a farmworker family of four pays $450 a month for a flimsy room with exposed wiring and plywood walls. Lopez’s nonprofit group seeks to solve the chronic lack of safe, clean and affordable farmworker housing. (Don Bartletti / LAT)
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Consuelo Nuño started as a grape picker at 15 in Delano, Calif. Now 63, she continues to work in a vineyard six days a week. She got a raise to $7 an hour last summer, and the bonus for each box picked is 2 cents more than in 1965. Around town, people still ask when her brother, Eliseo Medina, is coming back. (Don Bartletti / LAT)
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After working her regular Saturday shift picking table grapes, Consuelo Nuño, 63, greets her brother Eliseo Medina at an event marking the 40th anniversary of the 1965 Delano grape boycott. The children of a Mexican immigrant farmworker both embraced the UFW principles of decades past. (Don Bartletti / LAT)
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Jerry Cohen, left, and Eliseo Medina relive old times and talk about future possibilities at a United Farm Workers reunion in Delano, Calif., in September. Both left the UFW after it moved away from unionizing new workers. (Don Bartletti / LAT)
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Eliseo Medina, left, and Dolores Huerta at a 1971 march in Chicago. (Medina Family Photo)
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In 1976, Eliseo Medina works in an office with a picture of Emiliano Zapata, a central figure in the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920, hanging on the wall. (Cathy Murphy)
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