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Documentary series by Chapman professor explores the global child trafficking trade

Documentary series by Chapman professor explores the global child trafficking trade
Kelly Galindo stands with Kurdish soldiers while filming her documentary, “26 Seconds,” in Iraq. The commander of the group assigned soldiers to watch over Galindo as she filmed. (Courtesy of Alberto De Coste Calla)

Amazon Prime recently released the pilot episode of a Chapman University professor’s documentary series about child trafficking.

The first installment analyzes the trafficking industry in Cambodia and Thailand. Professor Kelly Galindo spent several years traveling to those Southeast Asian countries, as well as Iraq, Mexico, India and East Africa, to film “26 Seconds,” which refers to the interval in which a child is trafficked worldwide.

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“It’s horrific that this happens to children,” said Galindo, 55, of Orange. “Everyone thinks this is a Third World country problem, but it happens right here. I hope this can spread awareness and be a call to action.”

Galindo worked as an independent film actress and guest starred on television’s “ER,” “Sons of Anarchy” and “The Closer.”

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In addition to highlighting the crisis in foreign countries, Galindo’s series analyzes trafficking in Orange County, Southern California and other parts of the United States.

While the seven-minute pilot, which will soon be available on Google Play and iTunes, is the only available episode, Galindo plans to release six to eight more by November.

In Iraq, Galindo learned the intricacies of a trafficking system whereby the Islamic State was attacking villages, initiating boys and selling young girls into sexual slavery. She traveled to refugee camps for interviews flanked by members of the Kurdish military, a necessary security measure only 20 miles from then-ISIS-occupied Mosul.

In an interview with Galindo filmed in Orange County, a 10-year-old survivor recounted being raped by a male customer in a hotel across from Disneyland.

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“People don’t realize it’s in these affluent places,” Galindo said. “Traffickers will bring girls here because there is money to be made.”

The series includes the stories of victims and the nonprofits that help them try to heal and piece their lives back together.

Galindo encourages viewers to contribute to the nonprofits.

Follow @timesocofficial for more news and features about Orange County.

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