Oregon standoff
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Protest in Oregon

Oregon standoff
A television truck and a reporter in a car sit along Highway 78 near Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon on Jan. 27. (Rob Kerr / AFP/Getty Images)
Law enforcement personnel block an access road to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 27 near Burns, Ore. ()
Booking photos of eight people involved in the occupation of the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. Top row from left are Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy, Brian Cavalier and Shawna Cox. Bottom row from left are Joseph Donald O’Shaughnessy, Ryan Payne, Jon Eric Ritzheimer and Pete Santilli. ()
Arizona rancher LaVoy Finicum carries his rifle after standing guard at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore. on Jan. 6. Finicum was identified as the man shot and killed during a confrontation with police on Jan. 26. ()
Oregon standoff
A Oregon State Police officer at the scene of a confrontation on U.S. 395 in Seneca. Authorities said shots were fired during the arrest of members of an armed group that has occupied a national wildlife refuge in Oregon for more than three weeks. (Dave Killen / The Oregonian)
Oregon standoff
Sgt. Tom Hutchison stands in front of an Oregon State Police roadblock on U.S. 395 between John Day and Burns. (Dave Killen / The Oregonian)
More than a 50-mile stretch of U.S. 395 in Oregon was closed after a shootout involving members of a group occupying a wildlife refuge. ()
U.S. 395 is blocked at Seneca between John Day and Burns, Ore. ()
A sign referring to armed occupation leaders Ammon and Ryan Bundy is posted in front of a home in Burns, Ore. ()
Protesters in Eugene, Ore., rally against the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. ()
Ryan Payne of Montana, a member of the group occupying a federal wildlife refuge, participates in a community meeting in Burns, Ore. ()
Occupation in rural Oregon
Ammon Bundy, leader of a group of armed anti-government protesters, arrives to speak to the media at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore., on Monday. (Rob Kerr / AFP/Getty Images)
Guarding the entrance
One of the protesters, who gave the name “Captain Moroni,” guards the entrance to the refuge. (Amanda Peacher / OPB)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
Protesters roam the Malheur National Wildlife headquarters in Burns, Ore., on Sunday. Armed protesters took over the refuge on Saturday after participating in a peaceful rally over the prison sentences of local ranchers Dwight and Steven Hammond. (Mark Graves / The Oregonian)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
Ryan Bundy talks on the phone at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore. on Sunday. Bundy, son of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, is one of the people occupying the refuge. (Rebecca Boone / Associated Press)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
Brand Thorton of California blows into an African spiral horn on Sunday at the Malheur National Wildlife headquarters. Armed protesters took over federal buildings at the refuge after a peaceful rally over prison sentences for local ranchers charged with arson. (Mark Graves / The Oregonian)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
Protesters roam the Malheur National Wildlife headquarters in Burns, Ore. on Sunday. (Mark Graves / The Oregonian)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
Protesters in a watch tower at the refuge headquarters on Sunday. (Mark Graves / The Oregonian)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
Federal buildings at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Protesters are occupying the refuge in Oregon to object to a prison sentence for local ranchers. (Rebecca Boone / Associated Press)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
A National Wildlife Refuge System welcomes visitors to the site about about 30 miles southeast of Burns, Ore., that is occupied by armed protesters. (Les Zaitz / The Oregonian)
Protest in Burns, Ore.
On Saturday, protesters march in Burns, Ore., in support of a ranching family facing jail time for arson. After the peaceful protest, a group of at least 15 men, some of them armed, broke off and occupied a federal wildlife refuge and declared themselves its rightful owners. (Les Zaitz / The Oregonian)
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