Mars
38 Images

Mars rover mission

This image released by NASA on Wednesday, taken by cameras aboard the Curiosity rover, shows the Martian horizon. It’s one of dozens of images that will be made into a panorama. Curiosity landed Sunday on a two-year mission to study whether its landing site ever could have supported microbial life. (NASA)
Ken Edgett talks about a photo taken with the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on the surface of Mars during a news conference for NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge on Tuesday. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
Mike Watkins, Ken Edgett and Sarah Milkovich discuss new images showing the surface of Mars during a news conference for NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge on Tuesday. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
An image taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and projected on screen during a news conference shows the NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the components including the sky crane and parachute that helped it land on the surface of Mars, at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge on Tuesday. The Curiosity robot is equipped with a nuclear-powered lab capable of vaporizing rocks and ingesting soil, measuring habitability, and potentially paving the way for human exploration. (NASA / JPL)
This image released by NASA on Tuesday shows one of the first views from NASA’s Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on Sunday evening. The image shows what lies ahead for the rover -- its main science target, Mount Sharp. The rover’s shadow can be seen in the foreground, and the dark bands beyond are dunes. Rising up in the distance is the highest peak, Mount Sharp, at a height of about 3.4 miles, taller than Mt. Whitney in California. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems)
This image released by NASA on Tuesday shows a full-resolution version of one of the first images taken by a rear Hazard-Avoidance camera on NASA’s Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on Sunday evening. The image was originally taken through the “fisheye” wide-angle lens, but has been “linearized” so that the horizon looks flat rather than curved. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems)
This image released by NASA on Tuesday shows a color thumbnail image obtained by NASA’s Curiosity rover during its descent to the surface of Mars on Sunday. The image was obtained by the Mars Descent Imager instrument known as MARDI and shows the 15-foot diameter heat shield when it was about 50 feet from the spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems)
This image released by NASA on Tuesday shows a color thumbnail image obtained by NASA’s Curiosity rover during its descent to the surface of Mars on Sunday. This image from Curiosity’s Mars Descent Imager reveals surface features including relatively dark dunes, degraded impact craters and other geologic features including small escarpments that range in size from a few feet to several feet high.  (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems)
This image released by NASA on Tuesday shows a color thumbnail image obtained by NASA’s Curiosity rover during its descent to the surface of Mars on Sunday. This image from Curiosity’s Mars Descent Imager reveals surface features including relatively dark dunes, degraded impact craters and other geologic features including small escarpments that range in size from a few feet to several feet high. The image was obtained one minute 16 seconds before touchdown. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems)
Mars Science Laboratory team members Miguel San Martin, left, and Sarah Milkovich speak during a press briefing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Monday in La Canada Flintridge. Animation of the rover Curiosity is on screen in the background. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Mars Science Laboratory team member Michael Watkins, with a model of Curiosity, speaks during a press briefing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Monday in La Canada Flintridge. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
During a press briefing Monday at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mars Science Laboratory team members Miguel San Martin, left, and Sarah Milkovich watch a video of mission control erupting with joy Sunday night when it was confirmed that Curiosity had landed. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
NASA’s Curiosity rover and its parachute are seen by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as Curiosity descends to the surface of Mars. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)
In a photo taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Curiosity rover, bottom, with parachute deployed, descends to the surface of Mars. (NASA)
An image realeased by NASA shows NASA’s Curiosity rover. It was taken through a “fisheye” wide-angle lens on the left “eye” of a stereo pair of Hazard-Avoidance cameras on the left-rear side of the rover. The image is one-half of full resolution. The clear dust cover that protected the camera during landing has been sprung open. Part of the spring that released the dust cover can be seen at the bottom right, near the rover’s wheel. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)
One of the first images taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)
One of the first images taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover and transmitted back to Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)
Mars Science Laboratory flight director Keith Comeaux, right, celebrates at JPL with Martin Greco after the landing.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Kelley Clarke, left, celebrates at JPL as the first pictures appear on screen from Curiosity. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Brian Schratz hugs a colleague as jubilant JPL staffers celebrate Curiosity’s successful landing on Mars. “It’s an extraordinary step forward in planetary exploration,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science and technology advisor. “Nobody has ever done anything like this.” (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Adam Steltzner, right, a leader of the landing team, said that if any one of 76 pyrotechnic explosions failed to occur before landing, “We die.” Officials had spent much of the day Sunday speculating about how Curiosity might fail, and what the consequences might be for America’s space program. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Activity leader Bobak Ferdowsi, center, wipes tears away after the successful landing.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Celebrating the landing of the Mars rover, telecom engineer Peter Ilott hugs a colleague at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Propulsion engineers Todd Barber and Raymond Baker, right, prepare for the landing. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Activity leader Bobak Ferdowsi cuts his hair differently for each mission.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
NASA scientist Jim Garvin, right, talks with musician will.i.am, center, and astronaut Leland Melvin, left, next to a model of NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Astronaut Leland Melvin, left, talks to musician will.i.am at Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
John Grunsfeld, NASA associate administrator, looks back as the spacecraft Cassini is seen in the background during a news briefing at JPL.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
With a model of the Cassini spacecraft as a backdrop, Susan Bell of Oakland sends a Twitter message while participating in a social networking event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Doug Ellison of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory points out detail in a rubber replica of a Curiosity rover tire. (Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times)
Astronomy instructor Brad Snowder of Bellingham, Wash., posts a Twitter message during a NASA social networking event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  (Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times)
Geologist John Grotzinger observes a test at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in preparation for the Mars mission.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
Vandi Tompkin monitors a test at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in preparation for the Curiosity mission.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Joseph Carsten, left, and Vandi Tompkin watch from beneath the rover model during testing for the Curiosity mission on Mars.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
Scientists take pictures during a test for the Mars mission.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
Joseph Carsten watches a test of the Curiosity rover model at Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
Caltech geologist John Grotzinger, the Curiosity mission’s head scientist, examines the drill on a mock-up of the rover’s equipment.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
John Grotzinger, project scientist on the Curiosity mission on Mars, watches a test model of the rover bore a hole into a rock at Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)
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