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NBA draft results: Ben Simmons goes first, then the Lakers take Brandon Ingram

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The Philadelphia 76ers made Louisiana State forward Ben Simmons the first-overall choice in the 2016 NBA Draft leaving Brandon Ingram on the board for the Lakers to select with the second overall pick.

The Lakers also grabbed center Ivica Zubac out of Croatia (32nd overall).

The Clippers took North Carolina forward Brice Johnson with the 25th overall pick and added guard David Michineau out of France (39th overall) and center Diamond Stone (40th overall) via trade with the Pelicans.

Skinny on Brandon Ingram is he could be this town’s next big thing

They didn’t try to be too smart. They didn’t try to be too cool. They didn’t outthink it, overthink it or give in to the inviting temptation to trade it.

This time, the Lakers didn’t get fancy. This time, they simply got it right.

With the second pick in the NBA draft Thursday, the Lakers selected the best player in the NBA draft, officially beginning the post-Kobe Bryant era with a guy who could eventually remind people of Kevin Durant.

His name is Brandon Ingram, he’s only 18 years old, he weighs about 100 pounds, but he’s 6-feet-9 with arms that stretch forever and a shot that does something very specific the Lakers desperately need.

It goes in.

In his first and only season at Duke, the kid shot 46% on two-pointers, 41% on three-pointers, both figures which would have led all Lakers playmakers last season. Throw in the kind of defensive havoc that a 7-foot-3 wingspan can cause and you’ll understand how even cool-hand Luke Walton got excited.

“We got the player I wanted in the draft,” said Walton at a buzzing Lakers training facility. “I don’t know if he’s the best or not, but we got the player I wanted, for sure.”

Oh, he’s the best. The majority of scouts who follow these things agreed. The sly smile on General Manager Mitch Kupchak’s face agreed. The perception was even shared by the crowd of Lakers season-ticket holders sitting on folding chairs watching a giant TV on the facility’s gym floor, as they cheered loudly before Ingram was even picked.

They were cheering because the Philadelphia 76ers, picking first, went for the glitz selection of Louisiana State’s Ben Simmons. Many of them then erupted in a standing ovation when the obvious pick of Ingram was next.

“We felt we’d be very lucky to get Brandon into this organization,” said Kupchak.

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Brandon Ingram ready to join Lakers’ rebuilding process

What have the Lakers done?

Their first-round draft pick likes to quote Mike Krzyzewski, talks fondly of fishing with his grandmother while growing up in North Carolina, and, in his down time, loves to sketch with shading pencils and charcoal.

In other words, Brandon Ingram fits perfectly with Lakers Coach Luke Walton’s desire to assemble a roster of players with character.

And, indeed, the small forward can play.

All he did in college was generate one of the best seasons ever for a young player at Duke, ranking among the school’s all-time freshman leaders in scoring (third), three-pointers (second) and 20-point games (tied for second).

It was a no-brainer for the Lakers to take Ingram with the second overall pick Thursday after Philadelphia drafted Louisiana State forward Ben Simmons with the top pick at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center.

“We got the player I wanted in the draft. I don’t know if he’s the best or not, but we got the player I wanted, for sure,” Walton said. “What he has the potential of doing and what he can already do at his age with his length and skill set is very impressive and unique.”

The Lakers selected Croatian center Ivica Zubac with their second-round pick, 32nd overall.

Ingram, 18, averaged 17.3 points at Duke, displayed tenacity on defense despite a slender build and also showed good ballhandling skills while becoming the ACC freshman of the year.

Yeah, about that build.

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Second round: Jazz select Tyrone Wallace with the final pick of the NBA draft

Tyrone Wallace, 6-6, 198, California, point guard

The California native played four years with the Golden Bears. He stood out as a versatile defender who had the length to handle wing players. However, Wallace was not particularly impressive on offense; his field-goal percentage was 44.2% as a senior, and he shot just 29.8% from three-point range.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Kentucky’s selections are cut in half from last year

John Calipari’s face was all over the NBA draft coverage last year, but the Kentucky head coach’s spotlight was a bit dimmer Thursday night.

After seeing six players selected last year — two in the top 10 and four total in the lottery — Kentucky had three players picked in 2016. That included shooting guard Jamal Murray to the Nuggets at seven, big man Skal Labissiere slipping to the Suns at 28 (who reportedly picked for the Kings as part of a proposed trade) and point guard Tyler Ulis to the Suns at 34.

Last year, Karl Anthony Towns led the Kentucky parade when he went first overall to the Timberwolves. After him, Willie Cauley-Stein went to the Kings at six, Trey Lyes went 12th to Utah, Devin Booker went 13th to the Suns, Andrew Harrison went 44th to the Suns and Dakari Johnson went 48th to the Thunder.

It sounds like there might be a lot of Kentucky blue in Phoenix.

Jesse Dougherty

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Second round: Grizzlies select Wang Zhelin with the 57th overall pick

Wang Zhelin, 7-0, 251, center, China

The 22-year-old big man averaged 20.3 points and 12.9 rebounds while playing in the Chinese Basketball Assn.

— Barry Stavro

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Second round: Kings select Isaiah Cousins with 59th overall pick

Isaiah Cousins, 6-3 1/4, 194, Oklahoma, shooting guard

Cousins was a reliable spot-up shooter in college, in part because he shared the court with some dangerous scorers. He made 40.4% of his three-pointers as a sophomore, 45% as a junior and 41.1% in his senior year. But it is worth noting that he played alongside offensive juggernaut Buddy Hield and talented point guard Jordan Woodard. Cousins needs to shore up his ball-handling to create more of his own opportunities off the dribble and to be even more active without the ball. He’s also a solid defender.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Celtics select Abdel Nader with 58th overall pick

Abdel Nader, 6-6, 230, Iowa State, forward

Nader averaged 12.9 points and five rebounds per game for the Cyclones in his senior season. He spent his first two years with Northern Illinois before transferring to the Big 12.

— Matt Wilhalme

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Second round: Hawks select Kay Felder with 54th overall pick

Kay Felder, 5-8 1/4, 177, Oakland, point guard

Despite his lack of size, Felder led the nation with 9.3 assists per game as a junior last season, plus 24.4 points per game (up from 18.1 ppg as a sophomore). He’s shown steady development as a scorer and distributor. The primary questions about Felder’s game naturally revolve around his size. He compensates with speed, strength and a decent 6-foot-2 wingspan. But in the NBA he’ll have to prove he can compete with guards significantly bigger than him.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Nuggets select Petr Cornelie with 53rd overall pick

Petr Cornelie, 6-11, 220, France, power forward

Cornelie fits right into the growing trend of center-sized international big men who can play away from the rim. He is best described as a stretch forward and shot 42.1% on his three-pointers in the Eurocup league. Cornelie’s shooting touch makes him a capable pick-and-roll option who can also play well above the rim. On defense, the 20-year-old uses his size and length in the paint and he showed the potential to be a screen-and-roll defender around the perimeter.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Nets select Marcus Paige with 55th overall pick

Marcus Paige, 6-0 1/2, 164, North Carolina, point guard

He’s not the biggest point guard nor the most athletic, but he showed excellent decision-making in four years with the Tar Heels. Paige is capable of running an offense with a good assists-to-turnovers ratio, and he creates open looks for teammates. He is not a prolific scorer, though, and struggles at times getting to the rim. His mid-range and three-point shooting is solid. Despite his modest size, he showed plenty of effort on the defensive end while at UNC.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Nuggets select Daniel Hamilton with the 56th overall pick

Daniel Hamilton, 6-6 1/4, 197, Connecticut, shooting guard

Hamilton is a big shooting guard, but his athleticism allowed him to thrive on the fastbreak in two seasons with the Huskies. He’s not exactly a knockdown shooter, something he’ll need to improve at the pro level, but has a knack for driving to the rim. He averaged 4.7 assists per game last season. And his ability to both score and distribute could overshadow any of his deficiencies at either end of the floor.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Magic select Jake Layman with the 47th overall pick

Jake Layman, 6-8, 209, Maryland, small forward/power forward

Layman has the length and offensive versatility to be an effective stretch forward in the NBA and he stayed at Maryland for his senior season to develop his game. His outside shooting touch is impressive for his size; he shot 39.6% on his three-pointers last season. Layman also scores well with his back to the basket. He struggled at times as a rebounder, but his athleticism should allow him to hold his own on the glass against perimeter forwards.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Pistons select Michael Gbinije with 49th overall pick

Michael Gbinije, 6-5 1/2, 205, Syracuse, shooting guard/small forward

Gbinije was an interesting case at Syracuse, transferring out of Duke after one season. He arrived as an off-the-bench small forward and finished his five-year college career as a plus-sized point guard with a knack for scoring. In his final season Gbinije averaged 17.5 points while shooting 46.1% from the floor and 39.1% from beyond the arc. His ability to set up an offense and create shots for teammates will be an asset, regardless of his position. His defensive skills are a bit uncertain, after playing in a 2-3 zone for three seasons.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Jazz select Joel Bolomboy with 52nd overall pick

Joel Bolomboy, 6-7 1/2, 224, Weber State, power forward

Bolomboy established himself as a force on the glass in his last two seasons. As a senior he averaged 17.1 points and 12.6 rebounds per contest. He’s not a natural rim protector on defense and doesn’t have the size to compensate for that gap in talent. But what stands out is his rebounding, which is an NBA-ready skill.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Ivica Zubac, Lakers’ second-round pick, owns three Lakers jerseys

Ivica Zubac, the Lakers’ second-round pick in the NBA draft, has never spent time in Los Angeles, but the Croatian native owns jerseys of three former Lakers: Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum.

Just don’t ask him where the Bynum jersey is.

“It is somewhere in my room, under all my clothes,” Zubac said during a teleconference Thursday, chuckling. “Don’t say that!”

Zubac, a 7-foot, 240-pound center chosen No. 32 overall, said Bryant was his favorite player.

He watched Bryant’s final game on television in Croatia. It aired at 4 a.m local time.

“My older friends and guys who I looked up to were all loving Kobe, so I started watching him, and I really loved his killer instinct and his will to win the games,” Zubac said.

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Second round: Bulls select Paul Zipser with 48th overall pick

Paul Zipser, 6-8, 210, Germany, small forward

Zipser, 22, has been a consistent contributor for one of Germany’s best teams, Bayern Munich, as a combination forward. He is a reliable shooter and has sound court instincts, though he is unlikely to play power forward in the NBA given his slight build. He is less flashy and older than other international prospects, but many of his skills would help him transition to the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Celtics select Ben Bentil with 51st overall pick

Ben Bentil, 6-7 1/4, 229, Providence, power forward

Bentil was one of college basketball’s most-improved players this last season, going from 6.4 points in 21.5 minutes per game as a freshman to 21.1 points in 34.2 minutes as a sophomore. Playing alongside top point guard prospect Kris Dunn, Bentil used his strength inside and an adequate three-point touch to lead the Big East in scoring. His downside is on the defensive end, where he’s not quite big enough to defend bigs and will likely be matched up with perimeter-based forwards in the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Celtics select Demetrius Jackson with the 45th overall pick

(Streeter Lecka / Getty Images)

Demetrius Jackson, 6-0, 194, Notre Dame, point guard

Jackson is undersized but strong; his outstanding athleticism makes for excitement whenever he has the ball in his hands. He averaged 15.8 points as a junior after he took over the backcourt following top point guard Jerian Grant’s departure. Jackson played a major role in Notre Dame’s back-to-back Elite Eight appearances. His quickness helps him on defense. Overall, he has a solid foundation as a scorer and a defender and is a threat to make an eye-popping play.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Hawks select Isaia Cordinier with 44th overall pick

Isaia Cordinier, 6-5, 177, France, shooting guard

Cordinier hasn’t put up eye-popping numbers with Denain in France’s Pro B (second-tier) league, but he’s shown unquestioned athleticism for a shooting guard. He averaged 10.8 points, 3.7 rebounds and two assists per game, and his speed and leaping ability make him effective in the fastbreak and playing above the rim. That athleticism could also help the 19-year-old hold his own defensively in the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Pacers select Georges Niang with 50th overall pick

Georges Niang, 6-8, 230, Iowa State, small forward

Played four years in college, and the 23-year-old had a fine senior season, averaging 20.5 points a game and shooting 54.6% from the field.

— Barry Stavro

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Second round: Magic select Stephen Zimmerman with the 41st overall pick

(Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press)

Stephen Zimmerman, 7-0, 234, UNLV, center

The 19-year-old is tall enough to play center or power forward, but at the moment lacks the strength for an elite big man in the NBA. However, scouts are enticed by his potential. He is a solid passer and scores well on the pick and roll, though his jump shot needs improvement. The major question about Zimmerman is his defense; his slight build and slow lateral movement hurt him on the defensive end.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Mavericks select A.J. Hammons with 46th overall pick

A.J. Hammons, 7-0, 278, Purdue, center

Hammons averaged double figures in his four seasons, consistently using his size to thrive in the post. He helped the Boilermakers become one of the nation’s best defensive rebounding teams last season by grabbing 8.2 boards per game, while blocking 2.5 shots a contest, though there are some questions about whether he can be an effective rim protector in the NBA. He also needs to improve his passing and develop a shot outside the lane.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Zero suspense at the top of the NBA draft with Ben Simmons and Brandon Ingram

It was the night drama atop the NBA draft went to die, as well as the Oklahoma City Thunder as we knew them and the perception that budget department stores can’t outfit millionaires.

There was zero suspense when it came to the top two picks. Power forward Ben Simmons went No. 1 to the Philadelphia 76ers on Thursday night and forward Brandon Ingram was then immediately snapped up by the Lakers.

Simmons had tipped his hand by only working out for the 76ers, erasing any doubt about what the Lakers would do upon their third consecutive foray into the draft lottery.

“It honestly feels like all this pressure just has hopped off me,” Simmons told reporters after his selection. “Now I can relax, but now I know where I’m going to be. More importantly, I know where I’m headed and know I can really start working on what I need to work on for the team.”

The only intrigue regarding the top picks came when a 76ers fan held up a sign reading “Hinkie 3:16” on one side and “He died for your sins” on the other, a sacrilegious nod to Sam Hinkie, the draft pick-hoarding general manager who was ousted after failing to revive the franchise. An usher inside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., took the sign away from the fan.

The snooze factor ebbed a bit from there, with the Boston Celtics picking guard-forward Jaylen Brown third in something of a surprise. Point guard Kris Dunn, widely expected to go in that spot, went fifth instead to the Minnesota Timberwolves and proceeded to generate the most viral video of the first round when he gave shout-outs during his ESPN interview to Gucci for his sparkly shoes and J.C. Penney for his custom burgundy suit. It was believed to be the first time the luxury fashion brand and the discount department store had been uttered in the same sentence.

Oklahoma City potentially changed the fabric of the Western Conference by trading veteran power forward Serge Ibaka as part of a massive deal with the Orlando Magic, stirring reminders of the widely panned James Harden trade. Did the Thunder once again give up on a top player too early, wrecking their championship hopes?

Ibaka does have only one more season and $12.2 million left on his contract, but he was part of a Thunder core that reached the NBA Finals in 2012 and was one victory away from a return trip last month. Now the Magic must hope he’s not just a one-season rental and can be a sustained part of their rebuilding efforts.

Oklahoma City received point guard Victor Oladipo in the trade as well as forward Ersan Ilyasova and the draft rights to Domantas Sabonis, the Lithuanian big man whom the Magic took with the No. 11 pick. Conspiracy theorists might note that Oladipo is friends with Thunder forward Kevin Durant and hails from the same hometown of Washington, D.C., a potential lure in the Thunder’s efforts to retain the superstar free agent.

Phoenix hoarded the most high-end talent in the first round after consummating a trade with the Sacramento Kings that gave the Suns the No. 8 pick to go with their selection at No. 4. They hope they landed their frontcourt of the future after using the former pick on Croatian 7-footer Dragan Bender and the latter pick on Washington power forward Marquese Chriss.

A lesser trade involved forward Thaddeus Young going from the Brooklyn Nets to the Indiana Pacers for the rights to the No. 20 pick in the draft. The selection was used on Michigan point guard Caris LeVert, whose multiple foot surgeries apparently don’t frighten the Nets.

Young becomes part of a retooled Pacers lineup that will also include point guard Jeff Teague, who was acquired for the rights to the No. 12 pick that became Baylor forward Taurean Prince.

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Second round: Rockets select Zhou Qi with 43rd overall pick

Zhou Qi, 7-2, 218, China, center

Zhou has a 7-foot-7 ¾ wingspan, which helps explain why he led the Chinese Basketball Assn. in blocks per game. He also averaged 15.8 points and 9.8 rebounds. The main concern about Zhou is his strength; he needs to fill out his frame significantly to hold his ground against NBA centers.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Jazz select Isaiah Whitehead with 42nd overall pick

Isaiah Whitehead, 6-3 1/4, 210, Seton Hall, shooting guard

Whitehead scored 18.2 points per game in his sophomore season, a major improvement from 12 points in his freshman year. But even last season he made only 37.9% of his field goals, barely above his three-point average of 36.5%. He has good size for a backcourt prospect and shows some skills as a playmaker. He also can be effective on the other end of the floor, using his strength to slow opposing guards.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Pelicans select Diamond Stone with 40th overall pick

Diamond Stone, 6-10, 254, Maryland, center

Though this freshman is on the short side for a center, he has a wingspan of 7-feet-3 and is only 19 years old. He moves well in the low post and showed a good touch, footwork and instincts, though he was reluctant to share the ball. His defense and rebounding also need to improve for him to succeed in the NBA, but he has the raw talent to develop his game.

Stone’s rights are expected to be acquired by the Clippers.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Suns select Tyler Ulis with the 34th overall pick

Tyler Ulis, 5-8 3/4, 149, Kentucky, point guard

Ulis directed one of the best offenses in college as a sophomore, showcasing his ability to make on-court adjustments and distribute the ball to teammates. He also averaged 17.3 points per game. Ulis’ quickness and high energy earned him the SEC Player of the Year award and the SEC Defensive Player of the Year distinction. Of course, a major reservation about Ulis is his size. In the NBA, he will have to depend on his intelligence, court vision, ball-handling and speed to compete against bigger guards.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Pelicans select David Michineau with the 39th overall pick

David Michineau, 6-4, 180, France, point guard

The 22-year-old played sparingly for Chalon in the French league last season, averaging 5.7 points per game in 14 minutes of playing time.

Michineau’s rights are expected to be acquired by the Clippers.

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Second round: Bucks select Malcolm Brogdon with the 36th overall pick

Malcolm Brogdon, 6-5 1/2, 223, Virginia, shooting guard

After establishing himself as one of the best on-ball defenders in college, Brogdon used his senior season to expand his offensive game. He averaged 18.2 points as a senior to lead a balanced Virginia offense, shot 39.1% from beyond the arc and was extremely effective finding space off the ball. His athleticism and instincts should make him a sound defender at the pro level. One area Brogdon needs to improve in is creating scoring opportunities for his teammates. He averaged only 3.1 assists per game as a senior.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Bucks select Patrick McCaw with 38th overall pick

Patrick McCaw, 6-5 1/4, 181, UNLV, shooting guard

McCaw made a sizable jump in offensive production from his freshman to sophomore seasons, and he was named to the Mountain West Conference’s all-defensive team this past year. He’s been more productive in the open floor, but in his final season he made considerable improvements when playing off the ball. He averaged 14.7 points, 5.1 rebounds and 3.9 assists last season and mixed an outside shooting touch with a quick first step. His size, length and quickness could allow him to defend both guard spots and small forwards in the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Celtics select Rade Zagorak with the 35th overall pick

Rade Zagorac, 6-9, 205, Serbia, small forward

Zagorac has great size for his position and has shown significant development over the last couple years in the Adriatic League, though his game will need to improve in the NBA. On offense he is a solid shooter, passes well, is a good ball-handler and generally finds a way to score. He lacks speed and explosiveness, but his wingspan and court instincts help make up for those weaknesses.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Rockets select Chinanu Onuaku with 37th overall pick

Chinanu Onuaku, 6-9, 245, Louisville, center

Onuaku falls slightly below the ideal height for an NBA center, but has a 7-foot-3 wingspan and is strong for his size. Offensively, he has reliable hands and works well as a pick-and-roll finisher, converting 62.3% of his two-point attempts in his sophomore season. But he is a poor passer and struggles with turnovers. On the plus side, he’s a solid rebounder, grabs loose balls and rarely gets pushed out of position by other big men.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Second round: Celtics select Deyonta Davis with the 31st pick

Deyonta Davis, 6-9 1/4, 237, Michigan State, power forward/center

Davis didn’t have a big role at Michigan State in his first and only college season, but his size and athleticism make him an intriguing prospect. In a limited off-the-bench role he averaged 7.5 points and 5.5 rebounds in 18.6 minutes a game. He was often inefficient, but his 7-foot-2 wingspan put him on track to be a physical rim-protecting center in the NBA. He’s also shown enough quickness to develop into a capable pick-and-roll defender.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Ben Bolch: NBA draft picks 26-30 reviewed

26. Philadelphia 76ers | Turkey guard Furkan Korkmaz

Korkmaz could end up playing a while longer in Turkey before making his NBA debut with the 76ers.

27. Toronto Raptors | New Mexico State forward Pascal Siakam

It was an inauspicious start for Siakam when ESPN cameras showed another player when he was picked.

28. Sacramento Kings | France forward Skal Labissiere

Once considered a potential No. 1 draft pick, 7-footer still oozes potential after one college season.

29. San Antonio Spurs | Washington guard Dejounte Murray

All-around guard from Washington gets preliminary vote of confidence that he can handle the Spurs Way.

30. Golden State Warriors | Vanderbilt center Damian Jones

Jones could be the replacement for fellow Vanderbuilt alum Festus Ezeli or form a Commodores front court.

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Warriors select Damian Jones with 30th overall pick

Damian Jones, 6-10 1/4, 244, Vanderbilt, center

Jones averaged at least 10 points and five rebounds in his three seasons, and has the potential to be a two-way center in the NBA. He is savvy in the paint on offense and his size allows him to play well above the rim. Meanwhile, his 7-foot-3 wingspan makes him a natural rim protector at the defensive end.

Jones averaged an underwhelming 6.9 rebounds per game last season, partly because his tendency to try and block shots left him away from the defensive glass. He also needs to improve his mid-range jumper.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Brandon Ingram met his new Lakers teammates at a dinner before draft

Brandon Ingram, the Lakers selection with the second pick in the NBA draft, has already become acquainted with some of his new teammates.

Ingram made trip to Los Angeles two weeks before the draft to work out for the team.

He also went out to dinner twice with executives. The second meal included Lakers players D’Angelo Russell, Jordan Clarkson, Julius Randle, Anthony Brown and Larry Nance Jr., all of whom came “somewhat unannounced,” General Manager Mitch Kupchak said after selecting Ingram on Thursday.

“They all sat around Brandon, and the older people moved down to the other side of the room and the younger people kind of hung out together,” Kupchak said.

Ingram, a small forward from Duke, said during a teleconference after he was drafted that he thought he made a good first impression on his new teammates.

“It was very comforting for me to be with a bunch of those guys,” Ingram said. “I played with those guys a long time ago. I remember playing with, I mean playing against, D’Angelo Russell, when I was younger, so it was very fun.”

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Second round: Lakers select Ivica Zubac with the 32nd overall pick

Ivica Zubac, 7-1, 265, Croatia, center

His size and strength are his biggest assets and he’s been a steady scorer with reliable hands, solid footwork and a knack for finding an open shot. However, he needs some polish and experience, which is especially evident on the defensive end, where he has underperformed in protecting the basket and securing rebounds.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renne Griffin

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Spurs select Dejounte Murray with the 29th overall pick

Dejounte Murray, 6-5, 170, Washington, point guard/shooting guard

Murray was a well-rounded guard in his only college season, which is why he’s projected to be an NBA combo guard. The 19-year-old averaged 16.1 points, six rebounds and 4.4 assists for the Huskies and was at his best when pushing the ball in transition. But Murray needs to improve his outside shooting; he made only 28.8% of his shots from beyond the arc last season. Given his slight build, he’ll also need to add some muscle to help his defense.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Three teams come away with three first-round pieces in NBA draft

Three teams — the 76ers, Celtics and Nuggets — had three first-round picks in this year’s draft. Here’s what each team did with the rare opportunity:

The 76ers selected LSU forward Ben Simmons with the first overall pick, French winger Timothe Luwawu at 24 and Turkish floor spacer Furkan Korkmaz at 26.

The Celtics went with California guard Jaylen Brown with the third overall pick, French forward Guerschon Yabusele at 16 and Croatian center Ante Zizic at 23.

The Nuggets used their three first-round picks to grab Kentucky guard Jamal Murray at seven, Spanish forward Juan Hernangomez at 15 and Florida State guard Malik Beasley at 19.

The Suns also had three picks at the start of the draft, but ended up picking twice for the Kings as a part of a draft-day deal that netted Phoenix Washington forward Marquese Chriss via Sacramento’s eighth overall pick.

It’s not often that three teams account for almost a third of the first round, but the distribution of basketball’s top young talent was certainly concentrated Thursday night.

Jesse Dougherty

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Suns select Skal Labissiere with 28th overall pick in NBA draft

Skal Labissiere, 6-10 1/2, 216, Kentucky, power forward/center

Skal Labissiere, who’s from Haiti, played one season at Kentucky and didn’t have a breakout season. He played just 15.6 minutes per game and averaged 6.6 points and 3.1 rebounds; he scored more than 15 points in only three games. But he’s only 20 and is an intriguing NBA prospect because of his size and offensive versatility. He offered glimpses of a competent mid-range game with the Wildcats and showed that he can score with both hands around the rim.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Raptors select Pascal Siakam with the 27th overall pick in the NBA draft

Pascal Siakam, 6-10, 227, New Mexico State, power forward

Siakam has an impressive 7-foot-3 wingspan, though he would benefit from getting stronger. The native of Cameroon showed high energy and good speed and he averaged 11.8 rebounds per game last season, including four offensive boards. He is a solid finisher at the basket, but needs work on his overall shooting skills. Siakam is mostly untested at the other end of the court, as New Mexico State primarily played zone defense.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Welcome to the Clippers, Brice Johnson

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Ben Bolch: NBA draft picks 21-25 reviewed

21. Atlanta Hawks | St. Joseph’s guard-forward DeAndre Bembry

Wing prospect possesses quickness but needs to improve his jump shot to be an effective scorer in the NBA.

22. Charlotte Hornets | Syracuse guard Malachi Richardson

High-volume three-point shooter will replace much of the perimeter scoring the team lost in Marco Belinelli.

23. Boston Celtics | Croatia center Ante Zizic

Zizic received thumbs down from Celtics fans at the Barclays Center who probably know nothing about him.

24. Philadelphia 76ers | French forward Timothe Luwawu

Frenchman isn’t an international man of mystery; he’s known for defense and three-point shooting.

25. Clippers | North Carolina forward Brice Johnson

Veteran-laden Clippers hope renown leaper Johnson can boost their quotient of youth and athleticism.

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76ers select Furkan Korkmaz with 26th pick in the NBA draft

Furkan Korkmaz, 6-7, 185, Turkey, shooting guard

Kormaz has really good size for a shooting guard and his athleticism shines in fastbreaks. His best offensive skill is spot-up shooting and he’s also made considerable improvements shooting off the dribble, though he struggles a bit with his mid-range jumper. His slight build hinders him on the defensive end.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Clippers select Brice Johnson with 25th pick

Brice Johnson was one of the more impressive players in college last season, averaging 17 points, 10.4 rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game as a senior, while shooting 61.4% from the field.

He provided North Carolina’s guards with an alley-oop option and often crashed the offensive glass with abandon. Johnson has the size and athleticism to be a solid NBA defender, but his lack of discipline often left him out of position and in foul trouble.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Celtics take Ante Zizic with 23nd pick

The 19-year-old Ante Zizic is a high-effort player and his aggressiveness made him one of the best rebounders in the Adriatic League. He gets to the free-throw line frequently and makes 70% of his shots from the line.

Zizic is very mobile for his size, with many of his points coming off cuts to the basket. His passing is below average and he is a bit unpolished, but he has plenty of potential.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Sixers select Timothe Luwawu with 24th pick

After helping a French team secure a spot in the country’s top division, the 20-year-old Timothe Luwawu left his home to play for Mega Leks in Serbia against better competition.

He made big strides as an outside shooter the past year while also using his size and athleticism to create scoring opportunities. His 6-foot-11 wingspan allows him to guard multiple positions, including perimeter scoring threats.

But Luwawu needs to improve his shooting off the dribble and to cut down on his turnovers.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Ben Bolch: NBA draft picks 16-20 reviewed

16. Boston Celtics | France forward Guerschon Yabusele

The undersized power forward could be the Celtics’ French connection to a Draymond Green-style player.

17. Memphis Grizzlies | Vanderbilt guard Wade Baldwin

The guard with the wingspan of a pterodactyl could back up Mike Conley … or replace him if he leaves in free agency.

18. Detroit Pistons | Marquette forward Henry Ellenson

The stretch power forward can operate with equal ease around the basket and on the perimeter.

19. Denver Nuggets | Florida State guard Malik Beasley

The shooting guard recovering from stress fracture in leg is feeling whole after going higher than most projections.

20. Brooklyn Nets | Michigan guard Caris LeVert

Three surgeries in less than two years on LeVert’s foot couldn’t scare away the Nets from the lengthy guard.

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Hawks select DeAndre Bembry with 21st pick

DeAndre Bembry thrived as a versatile wing player for the Hawks, with enough skills to play every position but center on offense. His 6-foot-9 wingspan helped him defend guards and forwards.

He was most effective in the open floor offensively, and that should translate well to the NBA game.

But he’ll need to be a more consistent shooter; he shot just 26.6% from beyond the three-point arc. As a junior last season he averaged 17.4 points and an impressive 4.5 assists. But his defense is the weakest part of his game.

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Hornets select Malachi Richardson for Kings with 22nd pick

After showing flashes of an NBA-level scoring ability in his freshman season, a very strong NCAA tournament added to Malachi Richardson’s reputation.

Richardson was a reliable crunch-time scorer for Syracuse, though his season averages of 13.4 points and 4.3 rebounds weren’t overwhelming.

He combines a quick shooting stroke with an even quicker first step to score in different ways. It’s unclear what he’d like as a man-to-man defender, after playing in the Orange’s zone defense.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Nets turn Thaddeus Young into Michigan’s Caris LeVert

(Frank Franklin II / Associated Press)

The Nets shook up the draft board with a trade early Thursday, sending veteran forward Thaddeus Young to the Pacers for the 20th pick and a future protected second-round pick.

Brooklyn chose combo guard Caris LeVert out of Michigan at No. 20, which was a slight compensation for the Celtics having its first-round pick at No. 3 this year due to a 2013 trade that sent Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce to the Nets. LeVert was slowed by three foot injuries in the last two seasons with the Wolverines, but averaged 12.9 points and shot 40.8% from three in his last full season as a sophomore in 2013–14.

The Nets, as of now, have one more pick in the draft at 55th overall in the second round.

Jesse Dougherty

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Pacers select Caris LeVert with 20th pick

Caris LeVert was slowed by injuries the last two seasons, making his potential as an NBA guard a bit murky. In less than half a season as a senior, LeVert averaged 16.5 points, 5.3 rebounds and 4.9 assists.

These are impressive numbers considering he was rarely Michigan’s primary ball-handle; he also mixed it up on the defensive glass while defending perimeter players. But in pros, he may not be quick enough to defend wing players.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Former honorary Lakers Vice President Earvin ‘Magic’ Johnson weighs in on Brandon Ingram pick

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Nuggets select Malik Beasley with 19th pick

Beasley was thrust into a leading role as a freshman and responded by scoring 15.6 points per game. He was very efficient, finishing the year shooting 38.7% on three-pointers and 47.1% overall.

After establishing himself as a capable catch-and-shoot scorer, Beasley was able to go off the dribble and had success going to the rim. But while he’s a scorer, Beasley isn’t a great ball-handler and only averaged 1.5 assists per game for FSU, which indicates he might have problems creating shots for his teammates at the next level.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Pistons pick Henry Ellenson with 18th pick

In one season at Marquette, Ellenson proved himself as a hybrid big man who can both play inside and stretch the floor.

The 19-year-old’s talent diving to the rim was evident, and he also made 30 three-pointers in 33 games.

But Ellenson needs to be more consistent: He shot just 28.8% from beyond the arc. A better shot would help him utilize his size and speed. He didn’t shine defensively in college, though he’s shown enough overall talent to make him a prospect with considerable upside.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Lakers Coach Luke Walton likens Brandon Ingram’s defensive awareness to Draymond Green

Brandon Ingram, who was selected by the Lakers second overall in the NBA draft earlier tonight, is heralded for his size and scoring ability. He’s a 6-foot-9 wing player who scored 17.3 points per game for Duke as a freshman. He also shot 41% from beyond the arc, which makes his length all the more attractive.

But when Lakers head coach Luke Walton was asked what stood out to him about Ingram, he pointed to the 18-year-old’s ability to read plays as a defender. He also connected Ingram’s natural knack for rotating and switching to Warriors forward Draymond Green, who’s established himself as one of the NBA’s best all-around defenders.

“We had a kid up in Golden State, Draymond, we didn’t coach him how to be such a phenomenal team defender,” Walton said at the Lakers’ practice facility Thursday night, shortly after the franchise selected Ingram. “He just was because he sees the game like that. It means that the player is pretty intelligent. And I think Brandon fits that mold.”

Jesse Dougherty

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Celtics pick Guerschon Yabusele with 16th pick

Guerschon Yabusele has excellent physical tools and a reliable jump shot. He has great hands and does well around the basket. His defense is a weak point, but a lack of effort on that end could be partly due to his French league team’s struggles.

The 20-year-old has the potential to keep developing.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Grizzlies select Wade Baldwin with 17th pick

After two seasons at Vanderbilt, it’s Wade Baldwin’s shooting ability and length that made him one of the draft’s notable point guards.

He shot 40.6% on 199 three-point attempts in his two college seasons, and his 6-foot-11 wingspan and sideline-to-sideline quickness suggest that he could defend both point guards and shooting guards in the pros.

Where Baldwin might struggle is inside the arc on offense. He looked comfortable as a catch-and-shoot scorer while with the Commodores, but was less impressive shooting off-the-dribble and was not a huge threat going to the rim.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Ben Bolch: NBA draft picks 11-15 reviewed

11. Orlando Magic | Gonzaga forward Domantas Sabonis

The Thunder would be thrilled if the Lithuanian star included in Serge Ibaka trade turned into Arvydas Lite.

12. Atlanta Hawks | Baylor forward Taurean Prince
The versatile athlete who was expected to go late in the first round nudged his way into the lottery.

13. Sacramento Kings | Greece center forward Georgios Papagiannis

For those wondering, including Kings broadcasters, it’s pronounced YOUR-gos Pa-pa-YAHN-iss.

14. Chicago Bulls | Michigan State guard Denzel Valentine

Another draft pick with potential knee issues? Do the Bulls really want to go there again?

15. Denver Nuggets | Spain forward Juan Hernangomez

Hernangomez brings a fully formed jump shot to a franchise known for developing international players.

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Bulls select Denzel Valentine with 14th pick

He’s not the most impressive athlete, but Valentine was highly productive for the Spartans in his four seasons.

In his senior year, he averaged 19.2 points per game and made 48.1% of his two-point attempts and 44.4% of his shots from beyond the arc.

Valentine is patient and experienced in running an offense, though his defense is spotty because of his relative lack of explosiveness.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Nuggets select Juan Hernangomez with 15th pick

Juan Hernangomez is a natural combo forward who can stretch the floor and create matchup problems on the wing.

That versatility allowed the 20-year-old to excel in Europe by scoring in the half court, with the athleticism to also be effective on the fastbreak.

His major downside is his court awareness on the defensive end. He also needs to improve his jump shot, since it’s likely that he’ll primarily play away from the basket in the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Suns select Georgios Papagiannis with 13th pick

The 18-year-old Georgios Papagiannis has good mobility for his size. Plus, his long arms enable him to excel on defense and he recorded the second-most blocks of any player in the U-19 World Championships.

His jumper is solid and he makes for a big target in the post with soft hands. While he has the physical tools to compete in the NBA, there were some concerns about his intensity and conditioning when he played for the Greek team Panathinaikos.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Lakers coach Luke Walton discusses No. 2 overall pick Brandon Ingram

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Jazz select Taurean Prince for Hawks with 12th pick

Taurean Prince has the size and build to be a small forward in the NBA. His strength and explosiveness also makes the 21-year-old versatile on offense; he made 36% of his three-pointers and scores easily from the post when he has a size advantage.

Baylor often played zone defense, but Prince seems to have the skills to cover man-to-man. He’s not the flashiest player, but Prince is steady and versatile.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Ben Bolch: NBA draft picks 5-10 reviewed

6. New Orleans Pelicans | Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield

Pure shooter immediately becomes heir apparent to injury-plagued free agent Eric Gordon.

7. Denver Nuggets | Kentucky guard Jamal Murray

His 113 three-pointers ranked second all-time for a college freshman, behind only Stephen Curry’s 122.

8. Phoenix Suns | Washington forward Marquese Chriss

Chriss goes to Phoenix via trade, pairing with Bender to provide the Suns the front court of their future.

9. Toronto Raptors | Wisconsin center Jakob Poeltl

Poeltl is a 7-foot-1 center with athleticism as well as size, allowing him to thrive in transition.

10. Milwaukee Bucks | Sudan center Thon Maker

Maker’s length and athleticism should make him fit in perfectly on team stocked with those attributes.

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Hawks turn Teague into Baylor’s Taurean Prince

(Tom Pennington / Getty Images)

The Hawks acquired the 12th pick from the Jazz in a three-way trade Wednesday, and used it to select forward Taurean Prince out of Baylor.

In the deal, the Hawks sent veteran point guard Jeff Teague to the Pacers, the Pacers sent veteran point guard George Hill to the Jazz, and the Jazz sent the 12th pick Atlanta’s way. Prince played four years at Baylor, and is a 6-foot-7 wing who averaged 15.9 points per game and shot 36.1 percent from three. It’s unclear whether Prince will be a viable NBA defender because the Bears played a lot of zone, but his length and athleticism should allow him to hold his own on that end.

The Hawks will pick once more in the first round at No. 21, and also have the 44th overall pick in the second. All trades are pending “proposed” deals until July 1, when they can be officially confirmed by the league.

Jesse Dougherty

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Magic select Domantas Sabonis with 11th pick

Domantas Sabonis played for several U-18 Lithuanian teams before heading to Gonzaga, where he saw a major increase in minutes his sophomore year.

He excelled in the post, averaging 17.6 points per game, plus 11.8 rebounds and 0.9 blocks. He is somewhat limited by a below-average wingspan, though, and it’s unclear how well he will defend in the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Suns stacking their frontcourt with trade to pick Marquese Criss

The Suns started their draft night by picking European big man Dragan Bender with the fourth overall pick, and it’s now been reported that the Kings selected 6-foot-10 Marquese Criss for the Suns in the eighth spot.

Not all of the trade’s details have been reported — or made official since the NBA can’t confirm it until July 1 — but it’s clear that the Suns have grabbed two high-potential forwards in the draft’s first hour.

Bender has limited experience and most recently played sparingly for Maccabi Tel Aviv in Israel’s professional league, but he’s been pegged as a versatile scorer and serviceable athlete around the rim. Criss proved himself a reliable rim protector in one season at Washington, where he averaged 13.8 points, 5.4 rebounds and 1.6 blocks per game.

Both players are 18 years old and could form a dangerous frontcourt for seasons to come. Criss flashed onto the screen with a Kings hat on for his first interview as an NBA player, but he’ll soon be taking that off.

Jesse Dougherty

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VIDEO: The Lakers’ draft pick lacks mystery, but Brandon Ingram was still the smart pick

Bill Plaschke and Lindsey Thiry share reaction from the Lakers headquarters after Brandon Ingram was selected with the second pick in the NBA draft.

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Bucks select Thon Maker with 10th pick

Thon Maker, originally from Sudan, graduated from a Canadian high school and stayed for an extra year. The NBA, following its rule that players must be at least 19 and one year removed from high school, allowed him in this draft class.

He has limited experience, but has shown to be a versatile offensive player who can knock down perimeter jumpers and even put the ball on the floor. Maker’s 7-foot-3 wingspan and 9-foot-2 standing reach are strong selling points.

— Jess Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Ben Bolch: The top five picks in review

1. Philadelphia 76ers | Louisiana State forward Ben Simmons

Putting 76ers on the clock before top pick was waste of five minutes.

2. Lakers | Duke forward Brandon Ingram

No surprise here either. Now Lakers must hope youngest player in draft quickly blossoms.

3. Boston Celtics | California guard Jaylen Brown

Surprise, surprise! (For real.) Celtics will learn what Brown can do for them, possibly in trade.

4. Phoenix Suns | Israel forward Dragan Bender

Suns go on a Bender to secure 7-footer who possesses athleticism as well as size.

5. Minnesota Timberwolves | Providence guard Kris Dunn

Dunn can guard just about anyone and could put teams who passed on him on defensive.

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Kings select Marquese Chriss with eighth pick

After just one college season with the Huskies, it’s hard to tell how Chriss will be as an NBA forward. In college he shot the ball infrequently (21-for-60) from beyond the arc, but did manage to go off the dribble for some effective jump shots.

He is a bit more proven with the ball around the rim, where he has good touch with his back to the basket. He could develop into an effective pick-and-roll option.

His own defense is a problem: Chriss must learn how stay out of foul trouble -- he fouled out in 15 of his 34 college games.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Raptors select Jakob Poeltl with ninth pick

(Rick Bowmer / Associated Press)

Leaving his native Austria to play at Utah, Jakob Poeltl rose to prominence after averaging 9.2 points and 6.8 blocks as a freshman.

This last season, as a sophomore, he improved to 17.3 points and 9.1 rebounds per game. The big man employed his size, footwork and athleticism to dominate in the post, making 64% of his two-point attempts.

He also improved his passing, recording 1.9 assists per game, up from 0.6 as a freshman. He’s also solid on defense with good footwork.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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VIDEO: Lakers General Manager Mitch Kupchak talks about draft pick Brandon Ingram

Shortly after the Lakers selected Duke’s Brandon Ingram with the second overall pick in the NBA Draft, Mitch Kupchak was asked whether it was unfair to compare the 18-year-old with NBA star Kevin Durant due to their similar size and skill sets.

Here’s what the Lakers’ general manager had to say:

“I mean obviously it’s unfair. I can see why people would make the comparison, I think they’re both gifted players. If you looked at Kevin in college, the similarities are striking in terms of size and body build and body type. But beyond that Brandon has a long, long way to go, he has a lot of work in front of him. Having said that, we’re estatic to have him. He visited us 10 days ago, worked out in this gym, we had a couple dinner with him and go to know him. We’re pleased, we’re excited about having him in Los Angeles and we’re hopeful we can get him here in a week, introduce him to you people and get him to participate in summer league.”

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Suns draft pick Dragan Bender or actor Andrew Garfield?

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Nuggets take Jamal Murray with seventh pick

Murray was a high-volume scorer in his one season, averaging 14.9 shots per game to score 20 points. He took about seven threes per game, but made 40.8% of them.

He is extremely versatile on offense, with an ability to catch and shoot, score off the dribble and uses his athleticism to get to the rim.

Defensively, he wasn’t very impressive; he will have to improve that part of his game in the NBA.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Pelicans select Buddy Hield with sixth pick

Hield used a full college career to become one of the country’s most prolific scorers in his senior season as he led Oklahoma to the Final Four.

He finished the season averaging 25 points a game, shot 50.1% from the field, 45.7% from threes and 88% at the line. In the NBA, Hield should have the skill to be a valuable floor spacer for years to come.

But can Hield be effective going off the dribble in the pros? In college most of his scoring came in catch-and-shoot situations. Another worry: he was an average defender in college.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Timberwolves take Kris Dunn with fifth pick in NBA draft

Kris Dunn is considered the top point guard in this year’s draft, due to his ball-handling, size and ability to create scoring opportunities going to the rim.

He averaged 16.4 points, 6.3 assists, 5.2 rebounds and 2.5 steals as a Providence senior and was only slowed down when teams dared him to shoot from the outside.

He finished his final college season shooting 37.2% from beyond the arc and 44.8% overall. The knocks on Dunn have been some inconsistent shooting and a recklessness with the ball, but both deficiencies can be partly due to him having to do so much for a Friars team with limited talent.

His 6-foot-9 wingspan and lateral quickness should make him a competent NBA defender.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Welcome to the Lakers family, Brandon Ingram

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Suns select Dragan Bender with fourth pick in NBA draft

Dragan Bender played professionally in Israel the last two years and the 18-year-old international prospect has unknown potential.

He averaged 9.7 points and 7.4 rebounds in Israel’s second league two years ago, then, last season, he received playing limited time with Maccabi Fox Tel Aviv in the first division.

Even with limited experience, Bender has a hard-to-match physical profile and shot 36% from three-pointers in various competitions. He’s shown an ability to push the ball in transition and runs the floor well without the ball.

Defensively, Bender’s size indicates he’ll be a serviceable rim protector.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Celtics pick Jaylen Brown with third pick in NBA draft

Brown was closely followed by scouts all season, but didn’t post the offensive numbers you’d expect from a blue-chip recruit.

He shot 43.1% from the field, a below-average 29.4% from deep and a troubling 65.4% at the foul line. But Brown has good size and, conceivably, a lot of untapped potential.

His guard-like quickness and 6-foot-11 wingspan should allow him to guard multiple positions at the pro level and he showed an ability to score in bunches.

One knock on him is that his best offensive games didn’t lead to wins; Cal won just one of the four games when he scored 20-plus points.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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VIDEO: Reaction from inside Lakers headquarters with the selection of Brandon Ingram

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Jaylen Brown is the third player taken in a two-player draft

The Celtics were actively shopping the third pick in what has long been pegged a two-player draft, but selected Jaylen Brown out of California.

Two trades for the third pick that popped up in reports revolved around Bulls guard Jimmy Butler and Sixers big man Nerlens Noel. The Sixers were reportedly offering a package with the 24th pick, 26th pick, Noel and floor spacer Robert Covington to net the Celtics’ two first-round picks at three and 16.

But for now the Celtics have selected Brown, a raw shooting guard who averaged 14.6 points and 5.4 rebounds per game for the Golden Bears in his only college season. Time will tell if Boston will dangle Brown in front of the Sixers, Bulls or another team, or if he’ll stick with Brad Stevens and the Celtics.

— Jesse Dougherty

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Is Ingram the new cornerstone piece for the Lakers?

The Lakers hoped to find a cornerstone of their future by selecting Brandon Ingram with the second pick in the NBA draft Thursday.

Ingram is a reed-thin small forward who shot extremely well in his only season at Duke, making 80 three-pointers on 41% accuracy behind the arc.

He averaged 17.3 points, displayed tenacity on defense despite his slender build and also showed good ball-handling skills while becoming the ACC freshman of the year.

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Lakers take Brandon Ingram with second pick in NBA draft

If you looked at Ingram’s 7-foot-3 wingspan and 9-foot-1 standing reach, it would be easy to assume he was a center.

But the Duke product is a wing player with a guard-like skill set, which is why he averaged 17.3 points for the Blue Devils and hovered atop draft boards throughout his only college season.

He also averaged six rebounds and 1.2 blocks per contest.

There aren’t many holes in Ingram’s game, though he could improve his shooting off the dribble and add some consistency on defense.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Sixers select Ben Simmons with first pick in NBA draft

There are a plenty of reasons why Simmons is an elite prospect. He has good size, is a remarkably talented athlete who posted eye-popping numbers with LSU in his one season, averaging 19.2 points, 11.9 rebounds and 4.8 assists.

On offense, he displays deft ball-handling and passing skills for a player his size. Simmons’ athleticism helps him finish around the rim. He has excellent instincts on the other end of the court as well, often dominating the defensive glass.

The main concern about Simmons is his subpar outside shooting.

— Jesse Dougherty and Renee Griffin

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Tracy Murray talks about the nerves in the green room

Throughout the draft process, Tracy Murray was a bundle of nerves as he sat in the green room waiting to have his named called.

Murray eventually was taken 18th overall by the San Antonio Spurs in the 1992 draft. But seven days later, the former UCLA star was traded twice on the same day.

The Spurs sent him to the Milwaukee Bucks, who then shipped him to the Portland Trail Blazers.

“Man, it was the most nerve-racking couple of hours that I’ve ever had to go through. And quite frankly, I don’t want to ever do it again,” he said, laughing.

“It was the anticipation of knowing where you’re going. The teams you worked out with telling you certain things. I was projected between 10 and 20. So I went pretty much where I was supposed to go.

“But Houston had the 11th pick and they told me they were going to take me and they took Robert Horry. Then the Lakers and Clippers both said I was a local guy and they knew what I did, ‘So, we’re not going to let you pass us.’

“The Clippers took Randy Woods (at 16) and the Lakers took Anthony Peeler (at 15). Now I’m like, all right, everybody I worked out for, they passed on me. I don’t know where I’m going. So from pick 14 thru 17, I took a walk. I left the green room. I’m walking in the hallway because the nerves was killing me. It was just too much for me to sit there. I was the last one in the green room. Doug Christie went 17th to Seattle and then I went 18 to San Antonio, which I never worked out for San Antonio. It was just a bunch of weird stuff going on that day on draft day.

“On the morning of the draft, there was an article in the Oregonian on me and it was about how I had two hip surgeries instead of one. I had one hip surgery, not two. So when that came out in the Oregonian, I was like, ‘Oh, well, there goes my draft status.’ And then I go down to 18.

“When I was drafted by San Antonio, they told me don’t get too comfortable with the hat because ‘We think you’re going to be traded.’ So I’m going over rosters, trying to stay positive about the situation and I don’t know where I’m going.

“So, it was a hectic day. It was a day that was stressful. It was exciting. But my day was a roller coaster.”

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Jamal Crawford’s roller coaster draft day

On the day Jamal Crawford was drafted in 2000 out of Michigan, he recalled how emotional it was.

Crawford was drafted eighth overall by the Cleveland Cavaliers, but was traded on the same day to the Chicago Bulls.

“I remember it being a rollercoaster ride,” he said. “You hear so many different things about this and the mock draft. I didn’t get nervous until the cameras came around me right before I was going to get drafted because I was in the green room. I got nervous because I knew I was about to accomplish something and reach a lifelong goal.

“But I was traded immediately. The cameras came around and it was Cleveland’s pick and I’m like, ‘What?’ I didn’t even work out for Cleveland. I got drafted and at that point I was like, ‘Look, they called my name and we’ll figure out the rest.’

“I got traded while I was doing a press conference. I was doing a press conference for Cleveland and they said, ‘Hey, word is you’ve just been traded to Chicago.’ And then in the press conference I said, ‘I’ve always liked Chicago.’ Everybody started laughing.”

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Horry reflects on the loneliness of draft night

Twenty-four years later, Robert Horry says, “Hell, yeah, I remember that night.”

Horry was drafted 11th overall by the Houston Rockets in 1992 out of Alabama.

He recalled that it was “kind of a bittersweet” moment.

“Your lifelong dreams are coming true. But for me, I was at the draft by myself and it was the first time they had ever changed the draft from New York to Portland because of the Dream Team. And I was really mad because I only had one goal coming out of high school and college and that was to make the Olympic team. That goal was shattered by them pros,” he said, laughing.

“So when I went to the draft, I didn’t have a girlfriend at the time. My best friend was busy. My mom was scared to fly. My dad had just had neck surgery. So I was like the only one probably in the history of the draft that was a lottery pick who went to the draft by himself. My agent was in New Jersey and he didn’t fly across country because that would have been a long flight for him.

“The draft was bittersweet in a lot of different ways. I was by myself. Yet, I changed the makeup of my family by getting drafted and having the ability to do a lot of things financially. So, it really was a good day for me.”

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Shaq: ‘I was terrified’ before the draft

He was considered a once-in-a-generational player coming out of LSU. The dominant big man who could turn a franchise into a perennial force in the NBA for years to come, and yet Shaquille O’Neal was fearful leading up to the 1992 draft.

Every draft board had O’Neal going first in the draft that season, and he did go No. 1 to the Orlando Magic.

But when he reflected back on that moment when he sat in the green room in Portland, Ore., O’Neal kept thinking that maybe Georgetown’s Alonzo Mourning or Duke’s Christian Laettner would be taken ahead of him.

Mourning went second to Charlotte, and Laettner went third to Minnesota.

“I remember I was terrified. I was because it was always speculated that I would be the first pick, but I never went to those combine things. I didn’t go to anything. I didn’t travel to anybody or do any of those workouts.

“And I knew in the back of my mind Alonzo was a hair fracture better defensively than I was. And I knew that Christian Laettner was way better than me fundamentally. So, I was kind of scared.

“But, the one thing that didn’t make me scared was a couple of days before the draft, (Magic owner) Dick DeVose came and picked me and my father up from San Antonio and we flew to Orlando. We talked, had a conversation and we flew back, and then I didn’t hear from him in a while.

“I always heard I would be No.1, but I was still nervous. That’s why if you look at the draft, when they picked my name, I kind of had a little smirk on my face like, ‘Who, me? I went first.’

“I mean, I wasn’t terrified because I knew I was going to get picked at some point. But it would be quite embarrassing if you hear, ‘He’s the first pick. He’s the first pick,’ and then you go No. 2 or 3. So, I just wanted to be what everybody said I was going to be.”

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Mock draft: Figure Simmons and Ingram as top two, then ‘everything is up for grabs’

The speculation in NBA circles is that Louisiana State’s Ben Simmons is the draft equivalent of a slam dunk and will be the first player selected in the draft Thursday, by the Philadelphia 76ers.

The strong belief among league officials is that Duke’s Brandon Ingram will be the second player taken in the draft, by the Lakers.

After that, when the Boston Celtics go third, “everything is up for grabs,” said an Eastern Conference executive who was not authorized to speak publicly.

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Lakers are leaning toward taking Brandon Ingram

If the NBA draft unfolds as expected Thursday, the Lakers will pluck Brandon Ingram to fill Kobe Bryant’s spot.

It’s in the positional sense only — let’s not get carried away comparing someone with a 20-year NBA career to a college freshman — but the Lakers are in need of a small forward and might have one fall into their lap.

The Philadelphia 76ers have promised Louisiana State freshman Ben Simmons he’ll be the top overall pick, according to multiple reports, so the Lakers will lean heavily toward Duke’s Ingram with the second overall pick.

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What time is the NBA draft?

The 2016 NBA Draft will begin today at 5 p.m. on ESPN, with the Philadelphia 76ers making the first overall selection.

Louisiana State forward Ben Simmons and Duke forward Brandon Ingram are likely to be the first two players drafted, with the Lakers expected to take whomever the 76ers leave on the board.

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