Extraterrestrial Highway
11 Images

10 U.S. road signs to see before you die

Respect for the purity of public property apparently is alien at this Extraterrestrial Highway sign in central Nevada. 

 (Sam McManis/Sacramento Bee)

As the city’s website puts it, if you don’t visit the “Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign, did you even go to Vegas? Built in 1959, it stands about 25 feet tall.

 (Joe Daniel Price/Getty Images)

A sign links Chicago’s Jackson Boulevard with the historic U.S. Route 66. The legendary road once connected Chicago and Los Angeles, and one of its origin points was just a few blocks from the Willis Tower. 

 (Bruce Leighty/Getty Images)

People walk past the “End of the Trail” for Route 66 sign at Santa Monica pier in California. The two-lane highway, established in 1926 and coined the “Mother Road” by author John Steinbeck, seemed to encompass the essence of America, threading through eight states from Chicago to Santa Monica. 

 (Frederic J. Brown/ AFP/Getty Images)

A large marker sits just feet from the water at the Southernmost Point of the continental United States in Key West, Fla. Cuba is 90 miles south. 

 

 (Luis Castaneda Inc./Getty Images)

A billboard near Lantry advertises two iconic tourist sites in South Dakota — the Badlands and Wall Drug, which has somewhat of a cult following with signs as far as Morocco, Amsterdam and London. Read the full story.

 (Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor)

Often dubbed “the most crooked street in the world” Lombard Street offers drivers and pedestrians gorgeous views of the City of Love — if they can handle the curves. The street’s unique caution sign does the roadway justice.

 (Arturbo / Getty Images)

This famous one-block section of Lombard Street boasts eight hairpin turns.

 (Hiroyuki Matsumoto/Getty Images)

According to Hollywoodsign.org, the iconic structure, which looms over Hollywood Hills, was originally part of an ad campaign for a suburban housing development called “Hollywoodland.” 

 (Tim Hawley/Getty Images)

You could send your regards to Broadway, or you could make the trip and take a selfie with the street sign in Manhattan’s Theater District. 

 (Paul Seheult/Eye Ubiquitous)

The Four Corners monument in Navajo Tribal Park in Arizona gives visitors the rare (albeit odd) opportunity to be in four places at once. 

 (John Elk/Lonely Planet)
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