Keeping Bali clean
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Photos: Keeping Bali a paradise

Keeping Bali clean

On a “trash walk” through rice paddies outside Ubud, led by Cynthia Hardy of Bambu Indah hotel, a group of visitors spears errant plastic garbage. If they are home, she and her husband, John Hardy, lead the walks each morning at 7.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

A Bali trash walk is not for the faint of heart. Kathleen Morrison, with a pointed stick for spearing trash, makes her way along the Ayung River on a trek that will go through rice paddies and villages in the Bali uplands near Ubud. Behind her, Claire Traub grasps a guide wire to maneuver past a gap on the bank.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

At Bambu Indah hotel, a Balinese woman comes each day to make offerings of flowers and woven bamboo to the spirits that are an integral part of daily life on Bali.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

Below the main Bambu Indah grounds, swimming pools are accessible by a bamboo elevator, spiral staircase and bamboo bridge. At an evening cocktail party, Cynthia Hardy, in orange, steps off a revolving mandala of flower petals. Flaming bamboo torches add to the magical feeling. Day passes are available to visitors who are not hotel guests.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

“Lost Soles,” a sculpture made of cast off, color-coordinated rubber flip-flops welcomes guests to Potato Head, a popular beach club at the Katamama Hotel in Seminyak. The club’s exterior wall is made of reclaimed wooden shutters.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

A mangosteen, one of the delicious fruits of Indonesia, tastes like a mix of pineapple, banana and grape.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

The long house at Rob Cohen’s Villa Campuhan in Karangasem. The roofline evokes the horns of water buffalo, and is a feature of the traditional architecture of the Minangkabau people of West Sumatra.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

During a morning rice paddy trek near Karangasem, led by Emerald Starr, an American expat who founded Sorga, an organic chocolate company, we encountered a local farmer planting his crop in the calf-deep water.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

A walkway on the campus of Green School, perched on the Ayung River. One-third of the students are Indonesian; the rest come from 42 countries. Tours are available daily.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

Portraits of aged Balinese people on the sports field at Green School, a private nonprofit “school without walls” founded by John and Cynthia Hardy in 2009. It is based on the principles of respect for the environment, sustainability and positive change.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

The hand-hammered copper bathtub in the bathroom of the Africa cottage at Bambu Indah, in Ubud, Bali. The bathroom floors are wood slats, with inch-wide gaps, which can be slightly disconcerting at first.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
Keeping Bali clean

Inside Afrika House, a 150-year old bridal cottage transported from the island of Java by John and Cynthia Hardy, who own Bambu Indah, an eco-resort in Ubud. The room’s décor comes from the Hardys’ travels in Africa.

 (Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)
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