Monument Valley
31 Images

Postcards From the West: Monument Valley

Monument Valley
Photographers and spectators are dazzled by the shadow play as the sun begins to set and the colors to saturate. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Highway 163
Highway 163 stretches into Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park like a giant runway leading to the red buttes, mesas and grand vistas. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
Monument Valley sits along the Utah-Arizona border on land in the Navajo Nation reservation. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley tourists
A caravan of tourists, driven by their Navajo guides, head out for an evening drive along the bumpy, unpaved 17-mile loop around Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley vehicle tours
Two of the drivers at the Navajo-owned Guided Vehicle Tours booth wait for customers at daybreak in Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
The iconic buttes of Monument Valley and the surrounding areas are enhanced by the clouds from a passing storm. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
John Ford’s Point
Visitors to Monument Valley walk along the flat shelf known as John Ford’s Point where the legendary director shot several of his epic western films. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
The sun rises over the buttes and mesas of Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley tourists
Photographers with all types of cameras stop at sunset to capture their own personal views of Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley tourists
Two visitors to Monument Valley pose on the red sandstone rock formations while a friend takes their picture just after sunset. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
The sun sets over Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
The Totem Pole formation juts above an old set of footprints on the red sand dunes in Monument Valley while a storm approaches from the east. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley bird
A bird pokes around for food in the rocks near the View Hotel in Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
A perfectly good sunset is obscured by the clouds of a passing storm. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
Pools of water from a recent storm mix with red sand to create great reflecting ponds.  (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
A puddle left by a passing storm reflects the buttes in Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
The Navajos call this rock formation the Teardrop, a shape that gracefully frames the buttes and mesas of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Monument Valley
Another look through the Teardrop rock formation framing the buttes of Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
The View Hotel
Visitors to the Navajo-owned View Hotel enjoy a snack on the observation deck with a million-dollar view of Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
The View Hotel
Visitors to the View Hotel relax in the lobby next to a western-themed statue. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
The View Hotel
One of the buttes in Monument Valley is reflected in the windows of the View Hotel. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Goulding’s Lodge
Goulding’s Lodge is one of the oldest in Monument Valley with a trading post, restaurant and hotel. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
The Kayenta Monument Valley Inn
An alternative to the lodging in Monument Valley, the Kayenta Monument Valley Inn is a 45-minute drive away in neighboring Kayenta, Ariz. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
The Blue Coffee Pot Restaurant
If you get tired of the food being served in Monument Valley, the Blue Coffee Pot Restaurant is an alternative in neighboring Kayenta, Ariz. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
John Ford’s Point
Navajo tribal member Ned Black sells authentic, hand-made Navajo jewelry for his family members from a stand at John Ford’s Point in Monument Valley. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
John Ford’s Point
Navajo Adrian Jackson with his trusty horse, Pistol, awaits the next group of tourists eager to snap pictures at John Ford’s Point. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
John Ford’s Point
Navajo Adrian Jackson sits atop Pistol at John Ford’s Point. Jackson charges $5 for tourists to sit on his horse and to take pictures with a backdrop that legendary movie director John Ford used in several of his epic westerns. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
John Ford’s Point
A visitor to John Ford’s Point taking a picture atop a Navajo horse with the vistas of Monument Valley providing a backdrop. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
John Ford’s Point
Navajo matriarch Linda Jackson talks about raising her children, losing a son to a lightning strike and living off the land in Monument Valley. Jackson and her family sell food, mostly to tourists from her sandstone-colored trailer near John Ford’s Point. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Utah
Monument Valley stretches across the Utah-Arizona border on land characterized by majestic red buttes and mesas. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Anasazi ruins
Anasazi ruins in Monument Valley are reached via a short hike with the aid of a Navajo guide. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
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