Turks and Caicos
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Turks and Caicos: sights and scenes

Turks and Caicos
Two girls race past a mural on Providenciales -- Provo, to its familiars -- an island that is the main tourist center of Turks and Caicos Islands, a British crown colony east of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. At TCI, 33,000 residents share their corner of paradise with about 300,000 tourists annually. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
A guest greets the morning with yoga at the end of a pier in Turkoise, Club Med’s all-inclusive resort on Turks and Caicos. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
Conch shells pile high on the beach outside the Conch Shack, a Providenciales eatery that prepares the local delicacy in salads, chowders, gumbos and deep-fried fritters. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
Luxury homes rise on West Caicos, site of Molasses Reef, a new Ritz-Carlton project being promoted as “the ultimate escape.” The 125-room hotel, along with privately owned villas and cottages, is under construction. Prices range from $2.2 million to $6 million each. Granted, high-end tourism is the name of the game on TCI, but you can enjoy these islands on a budget. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
One of Turks and Caicos’ biggest draws is underwater: It’s there that divers and snorkelers come eye to eye with a color-saturated world populated by an array of sea life. Many people come to explore the coral reef, one of the world’s largest. Divers also can scuba down a vertical sea wall where the continental shelf drops a mile. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
Grace Bay in a nutshell: warm surf, white sand, happy feet. A visiting Times reporter had especially nice memories of the ultra-white, very fine sand at 12-mile-long Grace Bay Beach. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
It’s good clean fun -- well, maybe a bit sandy -- for guests at Club Med Turkoise. The French company pioneered the tourist industry on Turks and Caicos when it cut a road from the Providenciales International Airport and opened its doors in 1984. Compared with TCI’s spare-no-expense resorts, Club Med stands out for its lack of pretension. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
What dress code? It’s a casual vibe at a bar at one of the most popular Club Meds in the Americas. A Times reporter who stayed at Club Méditerranée Turkoise found that everyone was friendly, the Grace Bay Beach location couldn’t have been better, and the recently renovated rooms were fine, if a bit spartan. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
Guests and employees of Club Med Turk gyrate into the night. The resort caters to couples, singles and groups of friends 18 and older. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
On an island that boasts luxury resorts, a couple takes in a wealth of scenery at sunset at Providenciales’ Grace Bay -- free of charge. Which makes the point that you don’t have to be rich to have fun at Turks and Caicos. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
Sitting on the dock of the cay -- Parrot Cay -- is the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards, who has a multimillion-dollar beach house on the 1,000-acre private island, which bills itself as “the world’s most exclusive resort.” Homes of Bruce Willis, Christie Brinkley and Donna Karan share the shoreline with Richards’. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Turks and Caicos
Sink your toes in the same sand as the celebrities. As the sun disappears, visitors frolic surfside before a diaper change at Providenciales’ Grace Bay. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
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