Congressional leaders honor Capitol Police officer who died from injuries in Jan. 6 riot

A funeral service is held for Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the Rotunda
A funeral service is held for Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the Rotunda. Sicknick died as a result of injuries sustained during the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. He will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
(Kevin Dietsch / Pool Photo )
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Congressional leaders paid tribute Wednesday to slain U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick in the building he died defending, promising his family and fellow officers that they will never forget his sacrifice.

Police officers pay their respects at the memorial service in the Capitol
Police officers pay their respects at a memorial service for Sicknick.
(Getty Images)

Sicknick died after an insurrectionist mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, interrupting the electoral count after then-President Donald Trump urged them to “fight like hell” to overturn his defeat. The U.S. Capitol Police said in a statement that Sicknick, who died the next day, was injured “while physically engaging with protesters,” though the cause of his death has not been determined.

Wen-Ling Chestnut, right, the wife of Capitol Police Officer J.J. Chestnut
Wen-Ling Chestnut, right, wife of Capitol Police Officer J.J. Chestnut, who died in the line of duty along with Detective John Gibson on July 24, 1998, is comforted after attending the congressional ceremony for Sicknick.
(Carlos Barria / Pool Photo )
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Sicknick was a patriot who will be remembered by lawmakers each day as they enter the Capitol. “We will never forget,” she promised his family, who attended the ceremony.

Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband,  Doug Emhoff, pay their respects
Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, pay their respects to Sicknick.
(Brendan Smialowski / Pool Photo)

The 42-year-old officer was only the fifth person to lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda, a designation for those who are not elected officials, judges or military leaders. President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, along with their spouses, paid their respects during two days of visitation Tuesday and Wednesday, as did members of Congress and his fellow law enforcement officers. Both Biden, who visited Tuesday night, and Harris on Wednesday laid their hands on the urn in remembrance.

 Police officers pay respects
Police officers pay respects.
(Brendan Smialowski / Pool Photo)

Nancy Pelosi and  Mitch McConnell outside the Capitol
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell honor Sicknick outside the Capitol.
(Michael Reynolds-Pool / Pool Photo)
Mitch McConnell,  Kevin McCarthy,  Steny Hoyer  and Steve Scalise
From left, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and Rep. Steve Scalise.
( Drew Angerer / Pool Photo)
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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer with mourners
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, right, with mourners.
(Brendan Smialowski / Pool Photo)
Sicknick lies in honor in the Rotunda
Sicknick lies in honor in the Rotunda.
( Brendan Smialowski / Pool Photo)
Sicknick's remains are carried down the East Front steps
Sicknick’s remains are carried down the East Front steps after ‘lying in honor.’
(Michael Reynolds / Pool Photo)
An honor guard carries an urn with Sicknick's remains
An honor guard carries an urn with Sicknick’s remains.
(Alex Brandon / Pool Photo)
Officers carry Sicknick's remains
Officers carry Sicknick’s remains.
(Michael Reynolds / Pool Photo)
A truck carrying Sicknick's bike leaves the Capitol
A truck carrying Sicknick’s bike leaves the Capitol to head to Arlington National Cemetery.
(Alex Brandon / Pool photo)
A hearse leaves the Capitol with the  Sicknick remains.
A hearse leaves the Capitol with the Sicknick remains.
(Alex Brandon/Pool Photo)