Class
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Earthquake hits Haiti (Jan. 2010)

Class
Etienne Louis, 7, left, and his brother Samuel, 5, try to listen to their teacher despite an argument in the courtyard of Plein Soleil school in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Homeless
At the Plein Soleil elementary school, which provides education for impoverished boys, director Michel Vaillaud tells Haitians left homeless by the Jan. 12 earthquake that they must leave the grounds. An argument ensued. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Flag-raising
A student raises the Haitian flag on the boys’ first day back at school since the quake. In the background is Michel Vaillaud, who, with his wife, Francoise, founded the school. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
School
Only two dozen of the 200 students enrolled at the school were there for the reopening. The building was designed by two Haitian architects who relied on internationally accepted building codes, and it rode out the earthquake with only a few hairline cracks in its concrete floor. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Brass Band
A small brass band plays while the dead are buried in a mass grave in Titanyen, outside Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Gravediggers
Men cover the dead with dirt and rocks. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Bodies
Father Rick Frechette helps lift body bags off a truck for burial. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Mass grave
Bodies are laid out in the graves. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Coffin
A morgue worker at a hospital in Port-au-Prince carries a cardboard coffin prepared for one of hundreds of dead being transferred for mass burial in Titanyen. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
No. 745
Bodies are tagged before transfer to mass graves. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Frantic for food
A crowd gathered for food distribution gets out of control despite a heavy police presence in Cite Soleil, one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince. Thousands gathered at a gate trying to get food. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Frantic for food
Desperate Haitians try to push through a gate at a food handout in the poor Port-au-Prince neighborhood of Cite Soleil. Some women collapsed from exhaustion in the crush of people trying to get food. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Rescued
U.S. Army Spc. Nelson Whitney of the 82nd Airborne Division assists a severely dehydrated man who was pulled out of the rubble of a collapsed building in downtown Port-au-Prince. It is unknown whether he had been trapped for two weeks since the original earthquake. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Hungry
Two women collapse from exhaustion after fighting the line to reach a food handout. Despite a heavy police presence in Cite Soleil, one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince, the food distribution became violent. Thousands crowded at a gate trying to get food. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Horizon of Hope
These children at Horizon of Hope in Port-au-Prince have been at the private center, which functions as an adoption agency, since before the earthquake. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Exhausted
Water is poured over the head of an elderly woman who collapsed while trying to make her way through a crowd to reach a food handout in the Cite Soleil neighborhood in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
A Haitian woman eyes a man flirting with her as life goes on in a tent camp on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
Displaced Haitians line up for water in the Port-au-Prince tent camp where they now live. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
Girls bathe in the tent camp, where residents make do without amenities such as electricity and running water. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
Rudeson Laurent, 10, takes a drink of water after brushing his teeth on a smoldering pile of trash. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
A boy is checked by doctors from the Dominican Republic at a makeshift clinic in camp. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
A young Haitian woman in the tent camp still finds a reason to smile. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
Street preachers extol the power of God to residents of the tent camp. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
Jendy Duval, 33, peers out of his tent. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
Angela Paul washes up in her tent. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Quake aftermath
A Haitian boy flies a kite over the tent camp that has become his home. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Food distribution
United Nations troops from Uruguay try to control the crowd of thousands so that sacks of rice from the U.S. can be distributed in the capital, Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Surge of the hungry
The distribution of rice got out of control as thousands of people surged forward. United Nations troops fired tear gas to try to control the crowd in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Crowd control
A U.N. soldier uses his weapon, which fires tear gas, to push back people scrambling for sacks of rice at a distribution point in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Food distribution turns chaotic
A man is detained by U.N. soldiers. Many architects and planners envision a new capital with fewer people and more oversight. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Out of food
A U.N. soldier from Uruguay tries to hold back a surging crowd at a food distribution point in Port-au-Prince. Thousands waited for rice, but supplies ran out. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Queue for food
A hungry dog gets fenced in by a food distribution line in Port-au-Prince. Thousands of Haitians hoped to get bags of American rice distributed by the World Food Program, but in the end, supplies ran short. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti prayer gathering
Christian Haitians assemble in the center of Port-au-Prince, the capital, as part of a three-day prayer gathering. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Dawn prayer
A woman prays at the break of dawn in Port-au-Prince. At night, rich and poor take to the streets to sleep, worried about being caught in their homes if aftershocks hit. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Nightly conversation
In the Delmas area, three families with more than 75 members among them camp out on Rue Daine. They share their food and chat before turning in. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Sleeping outdoors
Many Haitians in Port-au-Prince are sleeping outdoors nearly two weeks after the earthquake. They are either homeless or too afraid to go back into their houses. In Petionville, a pizza restaurant serves as a huge sleeping area. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
A place to rest
Haitians in one Port-au-Prince neighborhood catch some sleep outdoors, too afraid to go back into their homes. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Cite Soleil
Residents of Cite Soleil, a district in Port-au-Prince and one of the poorest slums in the Americas, line up for aid and get instructions from troops. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Food aid
Residents of Cite Soleil leave with food supplies delivered by the U.S. military’s 82nd Airborne and UN.. soldiers from Brazil. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Food distribution
United Nations soldiers from Brazil pass out food from a truck to residents of Cite Soleil, an impoverished neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Cite Soleil
Residents of Cite Soleil line up for aid next to an open sewer filled with trash, some of it smoldering, as a U.N. peacekeeper from Brazil stands watch. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Obstacle
Residents of Cite Soleil jump over an open sewer with smoldering trash to get to a food distribution point. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Hand-out
U.N. troops from Brazil toss water bottles out of a large truck in an alley in Cite Soleil. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Children
Children in Cite Soleil look for their mother after getting emergency food rations. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Residents of Cite Soleil
Residents of Cite Soleil leave with food aid, delivered by the United States’ 82nd Airborne and U.N. soldiers from Brazil. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Bank security
United Nations troops keep guard at a newly-opened bank in Petionville, a suburb of Port-au-Prince. It was the first day since the quake that customers were allowed in to withdraw money and make transactions. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
On guard
Security officers with shotguns stand guard at the front doors of a bank in Petionville as customers queued up to get access to their accounts, the first time since the quake. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Sunday best
A young girl is dressed in her best available clothes to attend the funeral Mass for Roman Catholic Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot, 63, and Charles Benoit, the general vicar of the church, at the ruins of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Mourning
A priest in a white robe crouches in grief at the funeral Mass for Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot at the Notre Dame Cathedral in in Port-au-Prince. “This is very hard to explain,” said Father Giroux Mirine, a Canadian priest who has lived and worked in Haiti for 19 years. “We cannot blame God. We have to confront nature.” (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Funeral
Women mourn the loss of Haiti’s Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and General Vicar Charles Benoit at the funeral in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Grieving
A woman mourns the deaths of Haiti’s Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and General Vicar Charles Benoit during the funeral in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Paying their respects
Nuns stand beside a hearse during the funeral of Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and General Vicar Charles Benoit in front of Port-au-Prince’s Notre Dame Cathedral, which was destroyed in the Jan. 12 earthquake(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Mourners
A woman overcome by emotion is helped away during the funeral for Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and General Vicar Charles Benoit in front of the destroyed Notre Dame Cathedral in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Burial
A burial service is held for Haitian Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and General Vicar Charles Benoit in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Laid to rest
A casket is lowered after the funeral for Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot and Charles Benoit, the church’s general vicar. Hundreds of priests and parishioners attended the service at Notre Dame Cathedral in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Clearing a path
A man riding on a backhoe in downtown Port-au-Prince waves. Heavy equipment is being moved into downtown as cleanup begins sporadically in the quake-ravaged city. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Suspect
Police detain a man suspected of looting in downtown Port-au-Prince. The man, who refused to be identified, was later released. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Waiting
People, many of them aid workers trying to get home, wait in the shade for flights out at the airport in Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Hitching a ride
Three people including a man with a full leg cast, ride through Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Queuing for cash
Hundreds of Haitians line up at a money transfer store to collect remittances from family abroad. The city’s banks will open for the first time Jan. 23 since the 7.0 quake hit last week. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Port-au-Prince airport
People line up on the tarmac for a flight out at the airport in Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Supplies arrive
Aircraft, both civilian and military, from countries all over the world continue to bring in aid to the airport in Port-au-Prince. Three other airfields also are being used, two nearby and one in the Dominican Republic. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Relief supplies
Haitians line up in front of the presidential palace in Port-au-Prince for handouts of food and water from Brazilian troops with the United Nations. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Food aid
People queue for food and water handouts from Brazilian troops serving with the United Nations. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Food aid
A woman gets a supply of food and water from Brazilian troops with the United Nations. The U.N.'s World Food Program said it had distributed 1.5 million rations, mostly high-energy biscuits. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Plea
A banner calling for help in the Delmas 36 neighborhood in Port-au-Prince. U.S. officials said they are using three additional airfields to speed the arrival of supplies. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Aftermath of the earthquake
Rose Marie Riviera offers a portrait of her son Robert to a friend in downtown Port-au-Prince where she and her husband returned to their hardware store to assess damage. Robert, 18, was killed last week when the magnitude 7.0 quake struck. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Making do
Women carry supplies past a collapsed Texaco gas station in Port-au-Prince. Gasoline supplies may become a problem as a pier servicing tankers was damaged in the earthquake. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
All smiles
Young girls peer out of their corrugated steel home on the wharf in Port-au-Prince. U.S. military officials said the seaport is being reopened partially and will be able to handle up to 250 containers. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
On the streets
Jocelyne Arther sweeps trash into a bonfire in an alley, where she lives with her family since moving out of her quake-damaged home in Delmas 36. Residents of the neighborhood are organizing to get food, water and tents because most are living on the streets, afraid or unable to move back into their damaged homes. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Sorting through the rubble
A man wears a sombrero he found at the Foreign Ministry office in Port-au-Prince. The man, who declined to be identified, said he was a custodian at the building and was gathering documents for sorting. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Gaps
A man jumps over a crack in the ground along the wharf in Port-au-Prince. There are many large cracks in the area. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Enterprise
A teenager carries brooms for sale in downtown Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
A ride out of the city
Passengers wait for a bus to leave Port-au-Prince. The government has asked anyone who can to leave the capital, offering free transportation to the less-affected provinces. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Snacks
A vendor has snacks for sale to passengers waiting for their bus to head out of Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Food supplies
A man carries away a large bag of rice supplied by the United States. Many Port-au-Prince residents are complaining that they still have not received any aid. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Violence
Michel Chedler, 28, is taken in by police after he was beaten during an argument over stolen property and chased by a mob chanting, “You stole! You stole!” in Port-au-Prince. The police planned to let him go after the crowd dispersed. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Out of gas
A man pushes a truck with an empty gas tank in Port-au-Prince. Gasoline is scarce. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Living outdoors
Joudelene St. Helaere, 14, lies on her bed in an alley at 36 Delmas Street, where she lives with 10 family members. Residents have organized a committee to find aid. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Home on wheels
Widlene Petithomme, 16, lives with family members in a car in Port-au-Prince since the earthquake damaged their home. Residents of the Delmas 36 neighborhood are organizing to get aid. Most are living in the street. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Waiting for cash
People line up at a money transfer office in Port-au-Prince, hoping to get money from relatives abroad. Many waited in line for hours without getting in before closing time. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Waiting for cash
People wait in the heat at a Port-au-Prince money transfer office, hoping to get money from relatives abroad. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Hard day’s work
Sweat pours down the face of Marcel Otis, who has been using a sledge hammer to break up concrete in downtown Port-au-Prince. Merchants are hiring men to help get the remaining goods out of their damaged stores. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Bonanza of scrap in Haiti
Scrap metal collectors wait for a backhoe to finish moving chunks of a fallen building before scrambling to salvage steel rebar in Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital. Since the earthquake, salvage activity has exploded into all areas of the city instead of only the dump. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
At work in Haiti
A scrap collector in Port-au-Prince tries sawing through metal. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Making use of Haiti’s ruins
A scrap collector in Port-au-Prince hammers away concrete in the effort to get at rebar in the rubble. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
A load on top in Haiti
A scrap collector walks through a Port-au-Prince intersection carrying salvaged metal items on his head. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Pulling his own in Haiti
A scrap collector pulls a bwet, a wooden cart laden with wood he will use for cooking fuel, through the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Looter
A Haitian policeman beats a young looter with his rifle in Port-au-Prince. (Jewel Samad / AFP / Getty Images)
Emergency supplies
Earthquake survivors in the Haitian city of Leogane gather to receive emergency supplies. (Paul Jeffery / ACT Alliance)
Refugee
Melissa Dosou, 19, center, winces in pain as she is treated at a camp for the displaced in Port-au-Prince. (Jae C. Hong / Associated Press)
Injured
A woman on crutches heads toward an encampment in Port-au-Prince. (Jewel Samad / AFP / Getty Images)
Passing the rubble
Collapsed buildings are a common sight in Port-au-Prince. (Jewel Samad / AFP / Getty Images)
WARNING: GALLERY CONTAINS GRAPHIC CONTENT
In what has become a daily ritual in downtown Port-au-Prince, looters carry goods out of stores, all while keeping an eye on nearby police. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A man ducks under police tape warning passersby to avoid the ruins of the Notre Dame Cathedral of Port-au-Prince after a 5.9-magnitude aftershock shook the Haitian capital. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A policeman aims his shotgun toward looters in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Haitian families take refuge in the streets in Port-au-Prince after a powerful aftershock. Thousands of earthquake survivors have stayed outdoors instead of indoors because their homes were ruined in the earthquake or they fear new temblors. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A Haitian flag flies at half-staff in front of the collapsed presidential palace in Port-au-Prince. The flag, which is usually raised everyday, was placed in front of the ruins seven days after the deadly earthquake. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Haitian men wait for work from visiting journalists in front of the Oloffson Hotel in Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A damaged mural in Port-au-Prince displays artistic symbolism for death. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Food line
A man tries to keep his place in line for a food and water handout at a camp near the U.S. Ambassador’s residence. Thousands of homeless Haitians are staying at the camp. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A member of the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division keeps a line of Haitians moving toward a food and water handout in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Thousands of Haitians line up for food and water at a camp near the United States ambassador’s residence in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Rescued
Ena Zizi takes a drink of water after being carried alive from the rubble of Haiti’s devastating earthquake, one week after the city of Port-au-Prince was reduced to ruins. Members of a Mexican search-and-rescue team rescued Zizi from the collapsed home of the parish priest at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption. (Paul Jeffrey / ACT Alliance)
Providing care
An injured earthquake survivor is treated at a hospital at the airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Rescuers are still searching for survivors amid the rubble of buildings damaged or destroyed by the Jan. 12 quake. (Adriano Machado / AFP / Getty Images)
Waiting
Miche Guerieri, 21, sits on a boat with her 6-week-old baby after spending three days on a crowded ship off the coast of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Hundreds of displaced Haitians have taken refuge on ships in damaged port inlets, waiting for boats to help them escape from the earthquake-damaged capital. (Chris Hondros / Getty Images)
Welcome water
Water from a line broken by last week’s earthquake provides relief for a Haitian boy in Port-au-Prince. Aid has started trickling out to Haitians devastated by the quake, though many fear not enough will reach desparate citizens in time to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe. (Chris Hondros / Getty Images)
Leaving the city
A Haitian family trying to leave the city after last week’s devastating earthquake prepares to board a boat in the harbor of Port-au-Prince. (Oliver Labab-Mattei / AFP/Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
In Port-au-Prince, Haitian guards raise the national flag to half-staff in front of the National Palace, which was destroyed in the earthquake. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
A view of downtown Port-au-Prince, looking west, shows the scope of the destruction. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
A man gazes at the Port-au-Prince chicken shop where he worked for many years as men protect items in a truck. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
A woman navigates through the rubble in downtown Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Haiti’s presidential palace. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
One of the many tent camps that have sprouted in dirt fields in the capital. Some of the displaced are homeless; others are too afraid to go home. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Men line up for the chance to earn a bit of money loading goods in downtown Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Patrick Nore, 20, a university student, was at school when the earthquake struck. His left arm had to be amputated three days after he was injured because he had not received assistance in time. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
U.S. citizens wait to board a flight out of Haiti. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
A U.S. citizen boards a plane headed out of the country. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Members of the U.S. Navy are helping transfer personnel around the country, as well as delivering water. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
A boy waits in front of a converted school bus at a Port-au-Prince bus depot. Haitians are leaving for the countryside en masse. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Buses are jammed when they leave Port-au-Prince and empty when they return. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
A truck filled with people and their belongings drives out of Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
The Alnnus brothers, from right, Kerwens, Hans and Jenskaid, wait in a chapel doorway as rain briefly falls on Port-au-Prince. Haitians are worried that if intense rains come, damaged structures in the capital may slide down the hillsides, causing more death and misery. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
The Theodore family waits in Port-au-Prince for a bus to take them to the countryside. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Deacon Shawl, from his vantage point atop a bus, surveys the scene at a depot in Port-au-Prince. At the Haitian government’s urging and out of desperation, capital residents are leaving for regions where food and shelter are more plentiful. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake aftermath
Willins Jean, 9, cries as he gets a haircut in an alley in Port-au-Prince, where many businesspeople have set up shop in the streets. The boy said he was crying because he was hungry. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Violence
A man is grabbed by a group of men during looting in Port-au-Prince. U.S. troops were standing by to help provide security amid scattered reports of looting and gunfire in the capital. (Francois Mori / Associated Press)
First aid
Volunteer Winnie Romeril carries Estphane Shan to a first-aid post in Croix Desprez, Port-au-Prince. The United Nations said Wednesday that survivors could still be found in the debris of Haiti’s earthquake. (Talia Frenkel / Red Cross)
Scavenging
A man removes textiles from a destroyed store in Port-au-Prince(Ariana Cubillos / Associated Press)
Fires
Fires burn in downtown Port-au-Prince, where most of the buildings have been destroyed. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Nearly a week after the quake struck, Seraphine Joseph is still waiting to be cared for at a clinic in the town of Leogane. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Rebecca Brutus, 4, hangs on tight to a package of food her family received in Leogane. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Nearly a week after the quake struck Haiti, the people of Leogane are making do for themselves. Angelo Meyanse, 13, collects bricks from a church that was destroyed. The bricks will be used by his family to make a new home. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Patients at a clinic in Leogane, a sugarcane-producing area outside Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Nearly all of the buildings in downtown Port-au-Prince were destroyed. Burning ruins send smoke over the city. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
In Leogane, nearly every home has been damaged. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
People wait to fill water containers with a hose on a Port-au-Prince street. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A woman sorts belongings atop the rubble of her home in Port-au-Prince, the capital. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Young women balance a mattress in the capital. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Men play dominoes in the street in front of the French Embassy in Port-au-Prince. Some residents are beginning the attempt to resume their lives after last week’s 7.0 earthquake. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A young boy carries a table on John Brown Street in Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
Cracks have damaged a mural on the facade of a hair salon in the capital, Port-au-Prince. (Brian Vander Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
People beg for food and water outside a supermarket in Port-au-Prince. Troops, doctors and aid workers flowed into Haiti as hundreds of thousands of quake victims still struggled with basic needs. (Ariana Cubillos / Associated Press)
Earthquake in Haiti
Looters clash during the sacking of the business area in downtown Port-Au-Prince. Shipments of food and water reached many desperate Haitians for the first time since the earthquake hit last Tuesday. (Orlando Barria / EPA)
Earthquake in Haiti
Haitians climb onto buses at the bus terminal in Port-au-Prince, preparing to head south to Les Cayes. (Shawn Thew / EPA)
Earthquake in Haiti
Looters take what they can from the rubble in Port-au-Prince. (Luis Acosta / AFP/Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
Scavenging goods from a warehouse on Boulevard Jean Jacques Dessalines. (Shawn Thew / EPA)
Earthquake in Haiti
People look skyward as a U.S. military helicopter arrives with food and water at the Port-au-Prince airport. (Thomas Coex / AFP/Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
Former President Clinton helps unload medical supplies at a hospital in Port-au-Prince. (Win McNamee / Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
Cuban doctors treat a man with a gunshot wound in Port-au-Prince. (Luis Acosta / AFP/Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
Doctors treat a newborn at an Israeli medical relief center in the Haitian capital. (Juan Barreto / AFP/Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
Water is given to a child recovered from beneath the rubble. (Juan Barreto / AFP/Getty Images)
Earthquake in Haiti
A boy injured in last week’s quake lies on a bed at a hospital in Port-au-Prince. (Ricardo Arduengo / Associated Press)
Earthquake in Haiti
Displaced Haitians wake up on a street in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Gerald Herbert / Associated Press)
Washing up
Romain Arius, 35, washes his face at a refugee camp near a forward operating base for the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division in Port-au-Prince(Jae C. Hong / Associated Press)
Red Cross volunteer
An American Red Cross photo shows Red Cross volunteer Beatrice Abbot aiding Samantha Eskvowitz in Port-au-Prince’s Cite Soleil shantytown. (Talia Frenkel / Red Cross)
Evacuation
People board an Air Force C-17 at Port-au-Prince’s Toussaint L’Ouverture International Airport to be evacuated from Haiti to Florida(Patrice Coppee / AFP / Getty Images)
Seeking water
Five-year-old Jean Delimat await a chance to fill his jug from a broken water pipe as others try to bathe in the water. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Police presence
Haitian police try to prevent looting in central Port-au-Prince, but as soon as the officers leave an area, the looters return. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Bathing
Kimberly Ladens, 10, and other Haitians take advantage of a broken water pipe on the side of a street in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Prayers
A Haitian prays, just one of the faithful who gathered outside the collapsed cathedral in Port-au-Prince on the first Sunday after the earthquake. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
In ruins
On the first Sunday after the 7.0 earthquake hit Haiti, an elderly woman prays in front of the National Cathedral in Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Chaotic conditions
On the first Sunday after the quake, at 9:00am in the morning, the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince are filled with people scavenging. Onlookers add to the crowd. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Scavenging and violence
Looters continue to steal over the body of a man who has just been shot and killed by police in central Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Prayers
People pray during Sunday Mass outside the destroyed cathedral of Port-au-Prince. (Thomas Coex / AFP/Getty Images)
Outdoor services
Father Brutus Mathieu delivers his sermon to his parish at the St. Martin De Tours Episcopal Church in the Grand Rue neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. Churches are holding services to small congregations outside their damaged or destroyed buildings. (Shawn Thew / European Pressphoto Agency)
Suspected looters
A crowd of people looks at two men who were caught stealing and were bound and shot on Delmas Road in Port-au-Prince. The man in the yellow shirt was still alive after being shot through the head, but neither the national police nor the general public expressed any concern. (Shawn Thew / European Pressphoto Agency)
Walking the streets
People raise their arms as the national police fire shots at looters in Port-au-Prince. Police are on patrol as people dig through rubble trying to find supplies. (Shawn Thew / European Pressphoto Agency)
Waiting for gas
People wait to get gasoline in the Petionville suburb of Port-au-Prince. (Thony Belizaire / AFP/Getty Images)
Scavenging
People swarm a building in downtown Port-au-Prince, where the number of people scavenging continues to rise. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Goods from store
A looter makes off with rolls of fabric from an earthquake-wrecked store in downtown Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times)
Pyre
A man feeds a fire he set to burn a corpse in downtown Port-au-Prince four days after the earthquake. Residents have started to take action on their own because bodies haven’t been picked up and the stench is overwhelming. The deceased was a street vendor who was killed when a cement block fell on her, according to those who were around her. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
At a loss
Filiane Lander, 39, right, and Suzette Benjamin, 50, cover their noses as they watch the body of one of their friends being burned where she was killed by falling debris. “I was sitting right there,” Lander said, “when it happened. We don’t know what to do now. No one has told us. Not only do we not have money to buy food to sell, but we don’t even have a place to sit.” Many women like them sit on the sidewalks selling goods. Debris had fallen from the building above, killing their friend. Locals set the corpse on fire to try to eliminate the stench, which had become too strong after four days during which no city workers had come to pick up the body. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Waiting for relief
A boy watches a passing helicopter as Haitians line up to receive high-protein biscuits being handed out by the World Food Program with the assistance of United Nations troops. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Lining up
Crowds line up to receive food being handed out by the World Food Program with the assistance of United Nations troops at a camp for the displaced in a large field in north Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Medical aid
Dauphin Medjin Yamiley, 5, receives care from members of the International Medical Corps, headquartered in Santa Monica, who treated some of the hundreds of patients waiting to get care. Matthew Hoell, of Florida, assesses the girl’s injuries, which included a badly wounded leg and finger. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
Men wait in a long line for a gallon of gas, which is going for about $15 on the black market, four days after a 7.0 earthquake struck the Port-au-Prince area. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
Haitians cover their faces to avoid the smell of decaying bodies on a street in Port-au-Prince. While workers are burying in mass graves some of the tens of thousands of victims from Tuesday’s earthquake, countless bodies remain unclaimed in the streets. (Gerald Herbert / Associated Press)
Evacuees
Evacuees from Haiti are welcomed by relatives upon their arrival at the Torrejon military air base outside Madrid. (Daniel Ochoa de Olza / Associated Press)
Buried
Sam Grey of the Fairfax County (Va.) Urban Search and Rescue team holds a monitor showing a woman, alive and conscious, buried under the collapsed University of Port-au-Prince. (Gregory Bull / Associated Press)
Sleeping outside
A man holds his sleeping son during another night in a park in Port-au-Prince. Thousands of people are afraid to sleep in their homes, and many have no homes to go to. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Little security
An armed security guard patrols in downtown Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital, to prevent looting in the area where several bank buildings collapsed. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti damage
A section of downtown Port-au-Prince is among the areas that were heavily damaged. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake aftermath
The body of a police officer lies in a Port-au-Prince street. He was accidentally shot by fellow officers who mistook him for a looter. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
Looting continued in Haiti on the third day after the earthquake, although there were more police in downtown Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
The Port-au-Prince Cathedral was destroyed in the earthquake. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
A man taking part in the looting of a downtown Port-au-Prince store wears an Obama T-shirt. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Relief efforts in Haiti
International aid has started to arrive three days after the earthquake hit Haiti. A team from the World Food Program passes out water containers and purification tablets with the help of United Nations peacekeeping troops in central Port-au-Prince. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
An armed security guard monitors an area of downtown Port-au-Prince where the national bank building collapsed. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
A Haitian police officer ties up a suspected looter who was carrying a bag of canned milk. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti earthquake
Thousands of people in Port-au-Prince are still too afraid to sleep in their homes. A family gathers around a candle waiting for the sun to rise on the third night after the quake. They were singing hymns throughout the night. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Relief efforts in Haiti
A Belgian rescue team pulls 52-year-old Marise Pierre Louis from the rubble of her home in Port-au-Prince where she was trapped for three days. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Relief efforts in Haiti
Marise Pierre Louis, 52, is carried from the rubble of her home in Port-au-Prince where she was trapped for three days before being rescued. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Haiti rescue
Daniel Woolley, of Compassion International, is rescued from the Montana Hotel, where he spent 65 hours pinned under rubble. Touching his face is Mondesir Luckson, a bellboy who was also trapped in the ruins and with whom he was able to communicate. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
One of the many tent cities that have sprung up around Port-au-Prince catering to the thousands left homeless after a 7.0 earthquake. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)
Earthquake in Haiti
A young boy peeks out from sheets cobbled together for a makeshift tent in Port-au-Prince. Residents have been making do with whatever they can find. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)
Waiting in line
People line up for gasoline in Port-au-Prince. The U.N. and aid organizations are struggling to get food and water to survivors of the powerful earthquake that hit Haiti on Tuesday. (Lynne Sladky / Associated Press)
Water distribution
Haitians hold out buckets for water distributed from a firetruck in Port-au-Prince. (Chris Hondros / Getty Images)
Body recovery
A body is brought out from a collapsed building in Port-au-Prince. (Lynne Sladky / Associated Press)
Collapsed hotel
A body is buried in the rubble of a Port-au-Prince hotel. (Lynne Sladky / Associated Press)
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