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Motherhood in the time of Zika

As the Zika virus has spread at an alarming rate across the Americas, new mothers there are grappling with the fear that their children could have a serious birth defect. The number of babies born with microcephaly -- an underdeveloped brain, leading to an  -- has spiked since the virus came to Brazil. Though the condition hasn't been definitively proven to be caused by the Zika, pregnant women and mothers of newborn babies aren't taking any chances. Los Angeles Times correspondents Alexandra Zavis and Katie Falkenberg met several of them on assignment in Brazil. Here are some snapshots from their travels.


Maria and Kalissandra wait for their babies' physiotherapy appointments.

(Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Emanuel was born with microcephaly. His mother thinks she had Zika early in her pregnancy.

(Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Mothers line up to get therapy for babies with microcephaly at Dom Pedro I Hospital in Campina Grande.

(Alexandra Zavis / Los Angeles Times)

The CDC is helping Brazil study the link between Zika and microcephaly. This baby's measurements were normal.

(Alexandra Zavis / Los Angeles Times)

Evening in Campina Grande.

https://twitter.com/KatieFalkenberg/status/708497427083497473

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