Tim Cook's stance on unlocking that iPhone should be no surprise

Apple Inc. Chief Executive Tim Cook has made no secret of his position on helping outsiders -- including the government -- access Apple users' information.

Even before he said Wednesday that Apple would resist a federal judge's order to unlock an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters who killed 14 people in a December rampage, Cook has said repeatedly that his company has never worked with government agencies to "create a back door" in any of its products or services.

(Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

If those of us in positions of responsibility fail to do everything in our power to protect the right of privacy, we risk something far more valuable than money. We risk our way of life.

Tim Cook on Feb. 13, 2015, discussing companies that sell users' data

(Josh Edelson / AFP/Getty Images)

Weakening encryption or taking it away harms good people that are using it for the right reasons. And ultimately, I believe it has a chilling effect on our 1st Amendment rights and undermines our country's founding principles.

Tim Cook on June 1, discussing Apple's decision to encrypt FaceTime and iMessage communications

Josh Edelson / AFP/Getty Images
Josh Edelson / AFP/Getty Images (Jeff Chiu / Associated Press)

If you leave a back door in the software, there is no such thing as a back door for good guys only.... If there is a back door, anyone can come in the back door.

Tim Cook in November, according to Reuters

(Luca Bruno / Associated Press)

I don't believe that the tradeoff here is privacy versus national security.... I think that's an overly simplistic view. We're America. We should have both.

Tim Cook in a "60 Minutes" interview that aired Dec. 20

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