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Chris Rock's traffic stop selfies spark racial profiling discussion

Chris Rock's selfies spark racial profiling talk

Chris Rock has been pulled over by the police for the third time in two months and is continuing to chronicle it on social media.

The "Grown Ups" actor shared the latest selfie earlier this week, prompting a conversation about racial profiling.

"Stopped by the cops again wish me luck," the comedian tweeted on Monday, sharing a nighttime image taken from the driver's seat.

Rock, 50, shared the first picture in what has become a series on Feb. 13 and posted the next snapshot on Feb. 27 when he said he was "not even driving." He didn't specify the reasons for or outcomes of the stops.

The "Top Five" star's reps did not immediately respond to requests for comment on any of the incidents.

However, the four-time Emmy winner's latest post caught the attention of former "Grey's Anatomy" star Isaiah Washington, who replied to Rock's tweet, advising him to "adapt."

"I sold my $90,000.00 Mercedes G500 and bought 3 Prius's, because I got tired of being pulled over by Police. #Adapt @chrisrock," the outspoken actor wrote on Wednesday.

Washington's remark was met with criticism from musician Questlove and others, prompting the star of "The 100" to clarify his initial comment.

"Anyway, you millennial's critique and misconstrue my message to @chrisrock I'm getting back to my work to help free all y'all. #Truthdom," he added on Twitter.

Washington, who was briefly cast out of Hollywood during his heyday over homophobic slurs, further elaborated on the topic to CNN, describing his own experiences.

"At night, if [the police] don't recognize me, I'm vulnerable like everyone else," he said (via People). "I will say this. Once I got out of my G500 and have been driving the Prius for the last four years, with windows that are tinted darker than the windows that were tinted in my $90,000 vehicle, I have not been pulled over one time."

"Obviously, [Rock] hasn't broken any laws. And what you drive shouldn't matter, particularly if you are an African American man. But if you are at war, which we all know that we are, there is a sentiment in the air that is highly toxic, highly negative."

The Washington Post, citing Department of Justice data for 2011, said black drivers are about 23% more likely than white drivers to be pulled over, and about three times as likely to be searched after a stop. A smaller percentage of black drivers than white drivers are pulled over for speeding, but black motorists are more likely to be stopped because of a "vehicle defect," to check a record or for other unspecified reasons, the newspaper said.

Follow me on Twitter @NardineSaad.

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