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Emmys party pics: See who came out to play at the Governors Ball

 (Los Angeles Times)
(Los Angeles Times)

First party stop after the Emmy Awards? That would be the Governors Ball -- especially for the winners, because that's where they go to get their statues engraved.

Sarah Paulson engraves Marcia Clark's name on her Emmy >>

After heading next door to the Los Angeles Convention Center for the lavish event, the stars not only celebrated their honors, they also found time to photo bomb each other, pose with fans or just be themselves .

Click on the image above to see more photos from the most official of the Emmys after-parties.

The best acceptance speeches of the 2016 Emmys

Sarah Paulson accepts the award for lead actress in a limited series or movie for "The People v. O.J. Simpson." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Sarah Paulson accepts the award for lead actress in a limited series or movie for "The People v. O.J. Simpson." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

The 2016 Primetime Emmys have come and gone, but its acceptance speeches will live on as endearing and memorable moments in awards show history.

The best speeches resonated in part because they seemed as though they embodied a ceremony that was marked with intense emotions and shot through with indications that the increasingly inclusive landscape of “Peak TV” is here to stay.

CALLS FOR CHANGE

“Asian parents out there — if you could do me a favor — just a couple of you get your kids cameras instead of violins, we’ll be all good.” — Alan Yang, writer for a comedy, “Master of None”

Accepting with “Master of None” co-creator Aziz Ansari, Yang delivered an early speech that set the tone for the night to come, talking about the importance of Asian American representation in pop culture and his hope that his show was just the beginning.

Sophie Turner's Emmy reveals: A 'crazy' season on 'Game of Thrones' and why she and Maisie Williams got matching tattoos

Sophie Turner arrives at the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards. (Robyn Beck / AFP/Getty Images)
Sophie Turner arrives at the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards. (Robyn Beck / AFP/Getty Images)

"Who are you wearing?" It's is the perennial red carpet question. And during this year's Emmys arrivals "Game of Thrones'" Sophie Turner answered in typical fashion, telling E! News' Giuliana Rancic that her black lace gown was Valentino, her jewelry was Forevermark and her shoes were Louboutin.

But it was what Turner had on her arm that made news on the Emmys red carpet.

"We got matching tattoos!" said Turner about the skin engravings she and fellow "Game of Thrones" actress Maisie Williams had done a few days before the Emmys.

"I got it in peach," Turner said, "because my mum was like, 'Make sure it doesn't show up!'"

The tattoos read "07.08.09" for the date Turner and Williams got their "Game of Thrones" parts as sisters Sansa and Arya Stark.

The two are hoping these aren't the last matching tattoos they'll have done.

"We were always planning from Season 1, if we make it all the way through, hopefully we can all get a matching wolf or something. But we don't know if we're going to make it, so Maisie and I were like, 'OK, let's get these ones before anyone kills us.' Which is so possible."

And what does she know about what's possible in the coming season?

"I was actually speechless," Turner said about what she read in the scripts for Season 7. "This season is unbelievable. I think fans are going to be really satisfied. It's crazy."

A close-up of Maisie Williams' tattoo, which reads "07.08.09" to commemorate the date she learned she got the part in "Game of Thrones" as Arya Stark. (Getty Images)
A close-up of Maisie Williams' tattoo, which reads "07.08.09" to commemorate the date she learned she got the part in "Game of Thrones" as Arya Stark. (Getty Images)

The Emmys red carpet was a jewel box of color and sparkle — with a slice of lemon yellow

From left, Padma Lakshmi, Sarah Paulson and Angela Bassett. (Left and center, Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images; right, Frazer Harrison / Getty Images)
From left, Padma Lakshmi, Sarah Paulson and Angela Bassett. (Left and center, Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images; right, Frazer Harrison / Getty Images)

The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards red carpet may have physically taken place in downtown Los Angeles, but for several hours Sunday, it felt as if the red carpet ran through the middle of a Rodeo Drive gem vault thanks to an abundance of sparkle-embellished gowns, jewel-toned dresses and rich, velvet fabrics.

Emmys 2016 best and worst dressed >>

Among the standouts of the sparkle squad were Shiri Appleby in a bright-blue body-hugging sequin number from Diane von Furstenberg and America Ferrera’s midnight blue sequin embellished strappy gown from the pre-spring/summer 2017 Jenny Packham collection.

Jimmy Kimmel, Julia Louis-Dreyfus acknowledge a divisive election year as the Emmys get political

Julia Louis-Dreyfus said during her acceptance speech for lead actress in a comedy: “I think that 'Veep' has torn down the wall between comedy and politics." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus said during her acceptance speech for lead actress in a comedy: “I think that 'Veep' has torn down the wall between comedy and politics." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

This year’s Emmys were much more than just glamour, statues and self-congratulations. The impact of this year’s national election, with all its divisiveness and acrimony, received more than its share of attention.

Host Jimmy Kimmel got the political ball rolling right away in the ceremony’s pre-taped opening. Hitching a ride to the show, Kimmel bounced among rides including the white Bronco from “The People v. O.J. Simpson” and James Corden’s “Carpool Karaoke” vehicle before winding up in the passenger seat beside a “between jobs” Jeb Bush, playing a chauffeur.

“Here’s what I know: If you run a positive campaign, the voters will make the right choice,” the former Republican presidential candidate told Kimmel. When the host exited the car, Bush proclaimed “Jeb, exclamation point!” and pumped his fist as he peeled away with a shot of his familiar “Jeb!” bumper sticker in view.

Kimmel later jokingly chastised reality show producer Mark Burnett, contending that Burnett was responsible for the creation of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump due to Trump’s role on NBC’s “The Apprentice,” which Burnett created.

“Thanks to Mark Burnett, we don’t have to watch reality shows anymore — we’re living one,” Kimmel said. “If it wasn’t for television, would Donald Trump be running for president?”

Jimmy Kimmel and the Emmys tout — and pat themselves on the back for — their diversity

Emmy host Jimmy Kimmel. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Emmy host Jimmy Kimmel. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Though the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday celebrated television’s best moments, the ceremony gave near equal time to celebrating its own newfound diversity — and joking about the Oscars’ lack of it.

“This year's nominees are the most diverse ever,” host Jimmy Kimmel said in his opening monologue of a field that included 18 nominees of color for acting awards and several women in directing categories.

“And here in Hollywood, the only thing that we value more than diversity is congratulating ourselves on how much we value diversity. I’ll tell you, the Emmys are so diverse this year, the Oscars are now telling people we’re one of their closest friends.”

The night’s big winners reflected television’s move toward a more realistic and representative mix of shows, and away from the industry’s very male, very white traditions. Top winners included “Mr. Robot’s” Rami Malek for lead actor in a drama, “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story’s” Courtney B. Vance for lead actor in a limited series or movie  and “The Night Manager’s” Susanne Bier for directing a limited series, movie or dramatic special.

Where the Oscars almost felt uncomfortable joking about race — there were no acting nominees of color, thus the #OscarsSoWhite movement — during its telecast this year, the Emmys reveled in it — and also patted itself on the back.

A stunned Rami Malek, a teary Julia Louis-Dreyfus and other memorable Emmys moments

Alan Yang, left, accepts the Emmy for comedy writing with Aziz Ansari. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Alan Yang, left, accepts the Emmy for comedy writing with Aziz Ansari. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

There were some inevitabilities going in to the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday night: “The People v. O.J. Simpson” would win big, Maggie Smith wouldn’t show up even if she won, and we’d hear lots of Donald Trump jokes.

But the telecast, hosted for the second time by Jimmy Kimmel, proved to be a night marked by unexpected wins and funny, heartfelt speeches. Here’s a look at some of the evening’s most memorable moments.

Another low-speed car chase

Two of this year’s most-discussed series focused on the 2-decade-old O.J. Simpson trial, so it was hardly surprising that the Emmys telecast kicked off with a montage inspired by Simpson’s infamous low-speed car chase.

Kimmel’s attempt to reach the Microsoft Theater in downtown L.A. began in a white Bronco driven by Malcolm-Jamal Warner and continued in vehicles with the “Modern Family” Dunphy family, “Late Late Show” host James Corden, “Veep” President Selina Meyer (who made a fantastically off-color joke about LBJ, Lyndon Baines Johnson) and presidential candidate-turned-Uber-driver Jeb Bush. (“If you run a positive campaign, the voters will ultimately make the right choice,” he told Emmy nominee Kimmel.) The host’s arduous commute culminated in a ride on the back of one of Daenerys Targaryen’s “Game of Thrones” dragons — which set Ryan Seacrest ablaze.

Marcia Clark watches as her name is engraved on Sarah Paulson's Emmy

Sarah Paulson and Marcia Clark together at the 2016 Emmy Awards Winner's Circle. (Los Angeles Times)
Sarah Paulson and Marcia Clark together at the 2016 Emmy Awards Winner's Circle. (Los Angeles Times)

Inside the Emmy Awards "winners circle," flanked by large Emmy statues, the victors gathered to have their golden ladies engraved with their names and category honors.

The trophies are placed on a plexiglass stand and the engravers, wearing white gloves, get to work on placing the info on the trophy.

Patton Oswalt grabbed a glass of Champagne before having his Emmy engraved. As he waited, he tapped his fingers and leaned in to watch the process. As if the statue wasn't enough, each award-winner was also gifted with a box of Sterling wine that looked to outweigh the awards themselves.

Aziz Ansari checked his phone as he waited for his personalization to be done. Meanwhile, "Master of None" co-creator Alan Yang pulled out his phone to take a photo of the engravers getting to work on his trophy.

"One guest and one Emmy," security told those who were trying to sneak into the elite area.

As Paulson headed to the winners circle to have her trophy engraved, it became clear she was no longer stag. She asked security to allow Marcia Clark, who trailed behind her, to come through with her. Voila, Clark got the nod.

The women laughed and giggled as they watched the process, then Paulson showed some onlookers her statuette: Clark's name had been etched onto it as well.

It's customary for winner's trophies to engrave the name of the actor and the character they played at the bottom, but it's a special treat to witness this happen directly in front of their real life counterpart.

"It was an amazing night," the former prosecutor said. "I'm so glad I could share it with her."

Sarah Paulson and Marcia Clark together at the 2016 Emmy Awards Winner's Circle. (Los Angeles Times)
Sarah Paulson and Marcia Clark together at the 2016 Emmy Awards Winner's Circle. (Los Angeles Times)

How Jimmy Kimmel's Emmy jabs — and Jeb's exclamation point — was in sync with TV's new bold age

Host Jimmy Kimmel hands out peanut butter and jelly sandwiches during the 68th Emmy Awards show in Los Angeles. (Valerie Macon / AFP / Getty Images)
Host Jimmy Kimmel hands out peanut butter and jelly sandwiches during the 68th Emmy Awards show in Los Angeles. (Valerie Macon / AFP / Getty Images)

“Please tell me you are seeing this too.”

That was Rami Malek’s first comment after winning the award for lead actor in a drama at the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday night.

It was a sly reference to the narration his alienated and occasionally hallucinating character provides USA’s “Mr. Robot,” but it was also a fine summary of Sunday night’s telecast in its ability to reflect the changing nature of television.

In less than 10 years, television has gone from self-loathing despair to giddy disbelief over its elevated status, and now it appears to be entering an age of acceptance.

Television is now confident enough to make fun of even its sacred cows.

Mary McNamara

From the moment Jimmy Kimmel allowed his initially disappointing “I have to get to the Emmys” opening to be carjacked by Jeb Bush as the Uber driver piloting the limo of “Veep’s” President Selina Meyer, he was a host on fire. At times literally. The opening bit ended with Kimmel hitching a ride on Daenerys Targaryen’s dragon from “Game of Thrones” and roasting Ryan Seacrest as he wound up the red carpet coverage for E!

How Patton Oswalt celebrates his Emmy win

Emmys inspire a mini-'Friday Night Lights' reunion

"Friday Night Lights" may be gone, but at least the Emmys brought Connie Britton and Kyle Chandler together again.

Trading spaces: Emmy stars are asked to place a favorite character on another show

'People v. O.J. Simpson' at the Emmy Awards: A new verdict on the case

Sarah Paulson, center, hugs Marcia Clark after winning the Emmy for lead actress in a limited series or movie at the Emmy Awards at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Sarah Paulson, center, hugs Marcia Clark after winning the Emmy for lead actress in a limited series or movie at the Emmy Awards at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

It was Sarah Paulson’s moment — but it belonged just as much to Marcia Clark.

Paulson had just won the Emmy for lead actress in a limited series or movie for her portrayal of the former L.A. County prosecutor in FX's "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” and she used her time onstage to both thank and apologize to Clark, who failed to win a conviction in the case.

More than two decades ago, the Simpson trial in Los Angeles provided a flashpoint on race, criminal justice, domestic violence and celebrity while offering punch lines galore. On Sunday night at the Emmys , all those elements were again on display — along with a rare moment of public vindication.

“The more I learned about the real Marcia Clark‎ — not the two-dimensional cardboard cutout I saw on the news but the complicated, whip-smart giant-hearted mother of two who woke up every day, put both feet on the floor and dedicated herself to ‎righting an unconscionable wrong,” Paulson said. She noted that “I, along with the rest of the world, had been superficial and careless in my judgment.”

Tatiana Maslany on the representation of women on 'Orphan Black'

Backstage after her Emmy win for lead actress in a drama, "Orphan Black" anchor Tatiana Maslany expanded on her Grammy speech, noting the importance of portraying diverse characters on television.

"It’s a real point of pride for all of us on the show — there’s so much positivity in terms of representation and the way young girls were seeing themselves portrayed on the screen," she said.

"The LGBT community reached out to us as well — there is an immense joy in getting to tell women’s stories that we don’t normally see."

Tatiana Maslany finally wins an Emmy; Clone Club celebrates

Tatiana Maslany holds up her Emmy Award for lead actress in a drama series. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Tatiana Maslany holds up her Emmy Award for lead actress in a drama series. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

For the first time since “Orphan Black’s” premiere in 2013, fans of the show have a reason to celebrate on Emmys night.

Tatiana Maslany won the 2016 Emmy Award for lead actress in a drama series on Sunday, an accolade that members of the show's Clone Club feel has been long overdue.

Maslany has portrayed more than 10 characters so far during the course of the series and was, in fact, credited for more roles in her nomination than the rest of the lead drama actress nominees combined.

HBO and FX reign over the Emmys with 'Game of Thrones' and 'The People v. O.J. Simpson'

Ryan Murphy, left, and John Travolta accept the award for limited series for "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Ryan Murphy, left, and John Travolta accept the award for limited series for "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Thanks to O.J. Simpson, the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards partied like it was 1995.

“The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” the FX limited series that dramatized the sensational murder case and trial that divided a nation more than two decades ago, became the most celebrated program of the year at Sunday’s ceremony held at the Microsoft Theater and telecast on ABC .

The series won five trophies, including the award for limited series, movie or special. It was also honored for limited series actor (Courtney B. Vance), actress (Sarah Paulson), supporting actor (Sterling K. Brown) and writing (D.V.   DeVincentis).

On the series side, HBO ’s “Game of Thrones” marched into Emmy history with three wins, including drama series, for the second consecutive year. The series now has the most Emmy wins of any drama or comedy in history, with 38, surpassing the previous record of 37 held by “Frasier.”

Tatiana Maslany and Rami Malek — you probably didn't have them in your Emmy pool

Tatiana Maslany and Rami Malek and their Emmys. (Allen J. Schaben / Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Tatiana Maslany and Rami Malek and their Emmys. (Allen J. Schaben / Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

It was more revenge for the nerds Sunday night as, one year after “Game of Thrones” took its first drama series Emmy, the night’s top drama acting prizes went to a pair of young performers — Tatiana Maslany and Rami Malek — from genre shows very much beloved by the Comic-Con crowd.

Maslany won the lead actress in a drama Emmy for “Orphan Black,” a trippy sci-fi thriller that has the 30-year-old Canadian-born actress playing multiple clones. It was her second nomination and first victory.

“I feel so lucky to be on a show that puts women at the center,” Maslany said from the stage.

Malek, 35, meanwhile, won the lead actor in a drama Emmy on his first try for the debut season of “Mr. Robot,” in which he plays Elliot, a lonely, delusional cyber-vigilante aiming to bring down the world's biggest corporation and, in the process, eliminate debt and right income inequality.

“Please tell me you’re seeing this too,” a surprised Malek said, playing off the character’s paranoia. (Earlier, he had told E! he was practicing his losing face.)

Watch Jimmy Kimmel's monologue in 360

Stars and their Emmys: A love story

After walking off the stage as a newly brandished Emmy winner, some of TV's biggest stars take time to pose with their Emmys -- many with a kiss, and some with wide-eyed astonishment.

Here's some looks at that celebratory moment.

John Travolta of "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
John Travolta of "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus of "Veep." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus of "Veep." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele of "Key & Peele" (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele of "Key & Peele" (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Patton Oswald of "Patton Oswalt: Talking For Clapping." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Patton Oswald of "Patton Oswalt: Talking For Clapping." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Tatiana Maslany of "Orphan Black." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Tatiana Maslany of "Orphan Black." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Sarah Paulson of "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Sarah Paulson of "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Susanne Bier of "The Night Manager." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Susanne Bier of "The Night Manager." (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
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