Los Angeles Times

Geoffrey Mohan

Writer

Geoff joined the Los Angeles Times in 2001 from Newsday, where he was a Latin American correspondent in Mexico City. He was hired as a statewide roamer, but was quickly drafted into coverage of Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Soon after returning, he was sent out to the front lines of the California wildfires, and was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning breaking news team in 2003. Looking for a break from the action, he took refuge behind the editing desks in foreign and metro, serving as the environment editor and later, the state editor. He returned to reporting two years ago in Science, where he’s been writing about Ebola, African-clawed frogs and mathematicians who can predict NCAA winners. Now he’s coming full circle, back to roaming the state in search of stories about farmers, drought and innovation in agriculture and food science.

Recent Articles

  • What does that Thanksgiving meal cost?

    What does that Thanksgiving meal cost?

    Just a smidgen more. The oft-heard phrase for second helpings at the Thanksgiving table applies equally to the cost of the meal. The tab for the feast edged up less than a dollar from last year, and has increased about $21 since Ronald Reagan was midway through his second presidential term. Don’t...

  • EPA bans sale of pesticide that's toxic to honey bees

    EPA bans sale of pesticide that's toxic to honey bees

    It's the end of the line for sulfoxaflor, a pesticide used on a wide array of produce, but that has been found to be toxic to honey bees that are crucial to pollination of crops. The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday officially prohibited further sales and distribution of the...

  • Fed rule would ban widely used nerve-agent pesticide

    Fed rule would ban widely used nerve-agent pesticide

    Federal regulators on Friday proposed a zero-tolerance policy for food-borne residues of a pesticide widely used on edible crops nationwide, effectively ending its application to more than a dozen crops, including tree nuts, soybeans, corn, wheat, apples and citrus. The U.S. Environmental Protection...

  • Drought takes toll on 'agritourism' farms that once thrived on Halloween crowds

    Drought takes toll on 'agritourism' farms that once thrived on Halloween crowds

    Bob Lombardi, 70, went ahead and planted two acres of baby bear pumpkins in a corner of his shut-down ranch this year, just to say he had farmed for 50 years. He hoed them every day by hand, too, the way he and his wife, Joann, did in the beginning, when they had youth, hope and water. All three...

  • Mexican cactus, Chinese ginger top list of pesticide-laced produce

    Mexican cactus, Chinese ginger top list of pesticide-laced produce

    High levels of an illegal and toxic pesticide continue to be found in  purchased samples of Mexican prickly pear cactus pads, despite fines, border advisories and health notices, according to a statewide inspection report released Wednesday. Nearly 47% of the cactus samples showed high enough chemical...

  • Nestle drawing millions of gallons of California water on expired permit, suit claims

    Nestle drawing millions of gallons of California water on expired permit, suit claims

    Environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service on Tuesday, alleging that the agency has allowed Nestle Waters to draw water from a creek in the San Bernardino Mountains under a permit that expired more than 25 years ago.The company, owner of the Arrowhead bottled water brand, has drawn millions...

  • How much pollution did VW's emissions cheating create?

    How much pollution did VW's emissions cheating create?

    Volkswagen has admitted equipping half a million diesel cars in the U.S. with software to cheat on emissions tests — and then, in normal driving, to spew between 10 and 40 times the allowable levels of nitrogen oxides. But how much pollution have the cars created since 2009, when VW first installed...

  • Marijuana growers are new drought target

    Marijuana growers are new drought target

    Pot growers have been put on notice by state regulators that they will have to follow the same rules as the rest of the agriculture industry in protecting the state's drought-stricken water supply. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board issued an order Friday that will require...

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