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Jaweed Kaleem

Jaweed Kaleem is the national race and justice correspondent at the Los Angeles Times, where he writes about how race and ethnicity shape our evolving understanding of what it means to be American. He frequently reports on policing, civil rights, immigration, prisons and religion, among other subjects. At The Times, his reporting has taken him to Virginia to write about controversies over Confederate monuments, Texas to tell the story of the nation's only Spanish-speaking mosque, Montana to cover debates over refugee resettlement, and Michigan to explore the rise of black police chiefs. Before joining The Times, Kaleem was the senior religion reporter at HuffPost for five years. From 2007-11, he was a reporter for the Miami Herald. He attended Emerson College in Boston and grew up in Northern Virginia.
Starbucks is closing thousands of stores for racial bias training. Will it work?

After Starbucks was accused of racism for calling the police on two black customers, the company said it would hold racial bias training across U.S. stores. The effort is part of a growing trend among businesses and public institutions to teach their workers about implicit bias.

After police shootings, officers are rarely prosecuted. But many are fired

The recent firing of the officer who shot Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, La., in 2016 reflects a trend with officers involved in high-profile shootings. They often face no criminal charges but are get thrown off the force after public pressure on police chiefs.

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