Los Angeles Times

Thomas Suh Lauder

WriterArtist

Thomas Suh Lauder is a senior journalist for Visualization & Data. He has been with the Los Angeles Times since 2000, where he's developed data visualizations for Pulitzer Prize and Scripps Howard award-winning projects. A graduate of the University of Nebraska, his design work has been noted by the Society of News Design, the Society of Publication Design and Print Magazine.

Recent Articles

  • 249 drought maps show just how thirsty California has become

    249 drought maps show just how thirsty California has become

    While drought conditions have improved across Northern California in mid-May, Southern California is still experiencing below-average precipitation, according to theU.S. Drought Monitor. The Drought Monitor, which collects data from 50 different weather indicators, have shown an increasingly red...

  • Where the cameras roll

    Where the cameras roll

    Sample of neighborhoods with permitted TV, film and commercial shoots scheduled this week. Permits are subject to last-minute changes.

  • The challenges in making America 'one again'

    The challenges in making America 'one again'

    Republican National Convention 2016, the final day: Donald Trump's full speech, the takeaways, the reactions July 22, 2016, 2:15 a.m. The 2016 Republican National Convention is officially over. • Donald Trump argued that America's current status is grim and he is the man who will save it.• Here's...

  • El Niño could bring disaster and drought relief to California

    El Niño could bring disaster and drought relief to California

    How does El Niño work, and why might it bring rain and snow to California this winter? We answer your questions.  How might El Niño affect California? There's a favorable chance that this winter will be wetter than average in much of California -- from San Diego to San Francisco. The greatest chance for...

  • Water conservation amid drought: Who made the grade?

    Water conservation amid drought: Who made the grade?

    On April 1, as California entered a fourth year of drought, Gov. Jerry Brown stood in a barren field that should have been smothered in snow and demanded a 25% cut in urban water use. To comply with Brown's mandate, the State Water Resources Control Board developed reduction targets that each of...

  • Quake map puts new attention on Oklahoma, fracking wastewater

    Quake map puts new attention on Oklahoma, fracking wastewater

    Even in an area that was becoming accustomed to earthquakes, a 5.6 temblor near Prague, Okla., in 2011 stood out. The shaking was strong enough to destroy 14 homes, cause a highway to buckle and slightly injure two people. The initial shaking from a foreshock was felt just about 200 yards from...

  • Man-made earthquakes increasing in central and eastern U.S., study finds

    Man-made earthquakes increasing in central and eastern U.S., study finds

    For the first time, the U.S. Geological Survey has unveiled a map of earthquakes thought to be triggered by human activity in the eastern and central United States. Oklahoma is by far the worst-hit state recently, according to the USGS study released Thursday. The state last year had more earthquakes...

  • From the gutter: How your litter ends up in the ocean

    From the gutter: How your litter ends up in the ocean

    Even on a dry day, tens of millions of gallons of dirty water dumps into the ocean through the region’s vast storm drain system. The 3,500-mile network was designed and built to empty streets of rainwater, but tons of litter also flow into the ocean through the intricate system of curbside drainages,...

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