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(Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

As confusion swirls about the future for DACA beneficiaries, local school districts and colleges are reiterating their support for DACA students. Here are websites and links for Dreamers looking for legal resources:

For students and workers:

For parents of Dreamers:

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(Marcio Jose Sanchez / Associated Press)

University of California President Janet Napolitano blasted President Trump's decision to end a program that deferred deportation for 800,000 young immigrants and urged Congress to pass bipartisan legislation to protect them.

"This backward-thinking, far-reaching move threatens to separate families and derail the futures of some of this country’s brightest young minds, thousands of whom currently attend or have graduated from the University of California," she said in a statement Tuesday. 

Napolitano, who crafted the original Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy when she was U.S. Homeland Security secretary in the Obama administration, said the 10-campus UC system would continue to offer services for students who are in the country illegally. About 4,000 such students — also known as Dreamers — attend UC schools, with the largest number at UCLA and UC Irvine.  

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Hundreds of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights high school students walked out of class Nov. 14 to protest the election of Donald Trump as president
Hundreds of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights high school students walked out of class Nov. 14 to protest the election of Donald Trump as president (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Leaders of the Los Angeles Unified School District doubled down on their support for immigrant students after the Trump administration announced that it would phase out DACA.

“I am concerned by this decision and its long-term impacts on the students, families and employees of L.A. Unified,” Supt. Michelle King said in a statement. “These young immigrants have made valuable contributions to the community and the nation they consider their home, and they have earned the right to a permanent place in its history.”

L.A. Unified previously passed a resolution saying schools would make it harder for immigration officials to enter campuses. The district also launched a hotline for families struggling with immigration issues under Trump and started the school year with an inclusion campaign called “We Are One.”

Hundreds of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights high school students walked out of class Nov. 14 to protest the election of Donald Trump as president
Hundreds of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights high school students walked out of class Nov. 14 to protest the election of Donald Trump as president (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Leaders of the Los Angeles Unified School District doubled down on their support for immigrant students after the Trump administration announced that it would phase out DACA.

“I am concerned by this decision and its long-term impacts on the students, families and employees of L.A. Unified,” Supt. Michelle King said in a statement. “These young immigrants have made valuable contributions to the community and the nation they consider their home, and they have earned the right to a permanent place in its history.”

L.A. Unified previously passed a resolution saying schools would make it harder for immigration officials to enter campuses. The district also launched a hotline for families struggling with immigration issues under Trump and started the school year with an inclusion campaign called “We Are One.”

  • K-12
(Andrew Seng / Associated Press)

California’s top education official denounced Trump decision to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. 

“Our country made an honest deal with these students — study hard, earn your degree and you will get a fair chance to compete for college,” state Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson said in a statement. “We should keep deals, not break them.”

Torlakson said the students covered by DACA enhance California overall. “Their hard work, energy, dedication and diverse backgrounds help them contribute to our economy,” he said. About 217,000 children in California are Dreamers, according to the California Department of Education.

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(Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

President Trump is expected to announce Tuesday whether he will end protections for young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children, people familiar with the plans say.

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UC Irvine students and members of Chabad on Campus dance around Rabbi Blue, with guitar, after Students for Justice in Palestine disrupted a pro-Israeli film screening in May 2016.
UC Irvine students and members of Chabad on Campus dance around Rabbi Blue, with guitar, after Students for Justice in Palestine disrupted a pro-Israeli film screening in May 2016. (Don Leach / Daily Pilot)

A pro-Palestinian student group at UC Irvine is appealing its punishment in response to a protest during an Israeli veterans panel on campus in May.

University administrators gave the Students for Justice in Palestine two years of probation, 12 mandatory meetings to discuss free speech and a requirement to meet with administrators two weeks before hosting any event.

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(Associated Press)

Ankur Dhawan’s 6-year-old daughter walked into the living room one day in June and told her family she’d learned in school that you could be a girl in a boy’s body. Her classmate was one of those girls, she said.

She began to learn her way around the subject when her teacher at her Northern California charter school, Rocklin Academy Gateway, read from the book “I am Jazz,” co-written by transgender teenager Jazz Jennings. Earlier that week the teacher had told the class to refer to their classmate as a girl, by a new name.

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(Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)

They aren’t children, they aren’t perfect and — no matter what happens in Washington — they aren’t going to cower in the shadows anymore.

Some of them don’t even like the evocative label “Dreamers,” finding it as stigmatizing as the “model minority” stereotype that raises the hackles of so many Asian Americans.

“There’s this definition of a ‘dreamer’ that you are this perfect, good immigrant, but the reality is, everybody has a different story,” said David Buenrostro, who was brought to the U.S. from Mexico when he was 4 and grew up in South El Monte. He also thinks it stigmatizes the parents who brought children to the U.S. for a better life.

(Robin Abcarian / Los Angeles Times)

They aren’t children, they aren’t perfect and — no matter what happens in Washington — they aren’t going to cower in the shadows anymore.

Some of them don’t even like the evocative label “Dreamers,” finding it as stigmatizing as the “model minority” stereotype that raises the hackles of so many Asian Americans.

“There’s this definition of a ‘dreamer’ that you are this perfect, good immigrant, but the reality is, everybody has a different story,” said David Buenrostro, who was brought to the U.S. from Mexico when he was 4 and grew up in South El Monte. He also thinks it stigmatizes the parents who brought children to the U.S. for a better life.