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2016 Rose Parade: The floats, fans and a skywriting plane with a message about Trump

The 127th Rose Parade got underway about 8 a.m. today. If you missed the live broadcast, you're still in luck. Times reporters and photographers along the 5.5-mile route covered the parade live. Stay with us for a repeat of the live stream of KTLA's broadcast.

Join us for live updates from the 2016 Rose Bowl matchup between Iowa and Stanford

The parade in photos

The Millennium Falcon rises over the crowd for Disneyland Resort's “Diamond Celebration”  float. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Time)

The Millennium Falcon rises over the crowd for Disneyland Resort's “Diamond Celebration” float. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Time)

This entry from Disneyland won the the "Extraordinaire Trophy" for most spectacular float. Check out dozens more images from the 2016 parade.

Float viewing

If you live in Southern California but decided that waiting overnight in the chilly air wasn't your thing, you can still see the floats up close. Admission is $10 for anyone older than 5.

Entry to the float showcase is at East Sierra Madre and East Washington boulevards in Pasadena. Showcase hours for the general public start at: 

  • Jan. 1, 1 p.m. (last entry 4 p.m.)
  • Jan. 2, 9 a.m. (last entry 4 p.m.)
  • Jan. 3, 9 a.m. (last entry 4 p.m.)

Crowd cheers authorities as Rose Parade reaches end

Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies rode at the end of the Rose Parade as it wrapped up on Sierra Madre Boulevard, more than four hours after it began. 

They were cheered by the crowd after staffing a tightly secured parade.

By the end of the more than 5-mile route, many of the marchers and float riders were exhausted, their faces red.

At least the Lakers' float is having a winning season

The Lakers haven't been winning many games recently, but their Rose Parade float won an award for spectacular showmanship and dramatic impact.

The NBA team's float, "Every Second Is An Adventure,"  featured the Laker Girls. As the dancers cheered and pumped up the audience, Katy Oestreich, 34, bopped to the music. 

"I want to share my energy with them if they're sharing it with all of us," Oestreichsaid. 

What float is that? Who won what? Follow along here.

Bernie Sanders supporters get in on the parade action

Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders followed behind the last float at the Rose Parade, carrying banners and shouting "Feel the Bern!"

That's a wrap on the 127th Rose Parade

The last float has left the starting line at the Rose Parade, but floats and marching bands will be continuing down Colorado Boulevard for another hour or so. 

Follow along with The Times during the Rose Bowl this afternoon. The Stanford-Iowa game kicks off at 2 p.m. Pacific Time. 

Political airtime above the parade

Not long after the last float left the Rose Parade's starting line, a skywriting plane soared overhead. 

Attendees pointed and laughed at the plane's message: "America is great. Trump is disgusting. Iowans dump Trump."

It's warming up at the Rose Parade

Parade attendees began to shed hoodies, scarves and jackets around 10 a.m. as the sun came out and the temperature rose to 52 degrees.

Marching bands in stiff uniforms were sweaty and red in the face by the time they reached the end of the 5.5-mile route.

Nearby, a 6-year-old girl peeled off her puffy pink jacket, but left on her thick black gloves and knit cap. 

"You can tell we're Southern Californians," her mother said, laughing. "We dressed like it was going to be cold."

'The Bachelor' float: Will you accept this rose?

"Love Is the Greatest Journey" won the President's Award for most effective floral use.   

The Dole float, 'Soaring Over Paradise'

The food company's entry won the Rose Parade directors' award for outstanding artistic merit in design and floral presentation.

What float is that? Who won what? Follow along here.

Who was the first Rose Parade queen?

Past Rose Parade queens, from left: 1907 Rose Queen Joan Woodbury; May McAvoy, 1923; Dorothy Edwards, 1933; and Marilyn Smuin Martell, 1955. (Tournament of Roses)

Past Rose Parade queens, from left: 1907 Rose Queen Joan Woodbury; May McAvoy, 1923; Dorothy Edwards, 1933; and Marilyn Smuin Martell, 1955. (Tournament of Roses)

The first Rose Parade was held in 1890, but it wasn't until 1905 that a rose queen was named. 

The first queen? Hallie Woods, pictured below, surrounded by her court. Woods was 16 when she was crowned. She later married and settled in her hometown of Pasadena, where she died in 1964 at the age of 77. 

Read her 1948 interview with The Times here.

 (Graham Barclay / Tournament of Roses Archives)

(Graham Barclay / Tournament of Roses Archives)

Scenes along the 2016 Rose Parade route

Christianna Watkins, 12, right, from Lake Elsinore, and her friends play a card game sitting along Colorado Boulevard in advance of Friday's parade. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

Christianna Watkins, 12, right, from Lake Elsinore, and her friends play a card game sitting along Colorado Boulevard in advance of Friday's parade. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

A former foster child rises to the Rose Parade's court

Donaly Marquez, right, with other members of the Tournament of Roses Royal Court. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Donaly Marquez, right, with other members of the Tournament of Roses Royal Court. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

"It doesn't matter where you come from," 17-year-old Donaly Marquez told foster children after she was selected to the Tournament of Roses' Royal Court. "You can do anything as long as you set your mind to it." 

Marquez will graduate from Blair High School this spring. 

Read her story here. 

See Disney's float, 'Diamond Celebration'

Disney's entry won the Rose Parade's Extraordinaire Trophy for the most spectacular float. 

The float has three sections. The first is Elsa's ice palace from "Frozen," the second is the Disneyland castle and the third is "Star Wars" themed, to celebrate "The Force Awakens." 

Keep track of the floats here

Meet a Rose Parade Spanish-language broadcaster

Aside from a poncho blanket to stay warm, all Jose Vasquez needed Friday morning to broadcast parade highlights to an eager audiencewas his laptop, a Wi-Fi hotspot and a microphone. 

Vasquez was staffing Spanish-language coverage for listeners of Radio Adventist Los Angeles.

"They love this stuff," he said, describing the flower spectacles through tone and descriptions. "Every year I like the cars, the roses, the marching bands." 

The saxophone player and Costa Mesa resident said he feels lucky to experience the rhythm of the Rose Parade in real life.

Vasquez  works for "those who cannot get here. ... They may be far away or may be near. Traffic shouldn't prevent them from hearing how we start the newyear."

'Fight, fight, fight for Iowa!'

The yellow-clad stands along Colorado Boulevard screamed the University of Iowa's fight song as the school's band and float passed by. 

Stanford University's band, by contrast, got polite applause. 

Iowa faces off against Stanford this afternoon.

The Iowa Hawkeyes last played in the Rose Bowl in 1991, against the University of Washington.

But their last Rose Bowl win was even longer ago, as Chuck Mersch of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, well knows. He pulled up a newspaper clip from the game — in 1959 — on his phone.

"That is awesome," he said, as the South Dakota Department of Tourism's float passed by, a replica of the famed faces of Mt. Rushmore, done in fresh and dried flowers. 

"Everything has come up roses on this trip," Mersch said.

Battle of the bands

He remembers when

The mood's a little giddy at the finish line

Even after the Rose Parade kicks off, it's always awhile before the floats reach the end of the route, near Sierra Madre Boulevard and Altadena Drive.

Hours into their wait, fans there began to cheer at everything, from a unicycle to a passing Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department patrol car.

A woman walked on the route, holding the hand of a tiny girl in pigtails and a pink-and-silver coat.

Someone yelled, "Baby parade! Woo!"

The woman grinned: "She's practicing for Rose Queen."

'No, Jesus would let us sleep'

Before the Rose Parade kicked off, proselytizers marched along the route, toting tall white crosses and bullhorns.

One man yelled through a bullhorn, telling paradegoers that Jesus wanted them to repent. 

It was before sunrise, and campers were sleeping along the roadway. 

"No, Jesus would let us sleep," a woman yelled back.

Copyright © 2016, Los Angeles Times
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