Lifestyle

Recipe: Celery root and apple slaw

CookingLifestyle and Leisure

Total time: 25 minutes

Servings: 8 to 10

1 generous cup chopped pecans

3 1/2 pounds (about 3 large or 4 medium) celery root

Cider vinegar

2 large Gala apples

1/2 cup dried currants

1 cup sour cream

1 3/4 teaspoons prepared horseradish

1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon sugar

Salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread the chopped pecans on a baking sheet and place in the oven for 8 minutes, until lightly toasted. Remove from the oven and set aside.

2. Using a knife or vegetable peeler, remove the tough outer skin from the celery roots. Trim to square off the rounded edges so that each celery root is a 2 1/2 - or 3-inch cube. Use the julienne setting of a mandoline or a sharp knife to slice them into one-eighth-inch julienne. Transfer the celery root to a large bowl, add just enough cider vinegar to coat, then toss; this will keep them from oxidizing and browning.

2. Core the apples (unpeeled) and quarter them lengthwise. Cut each quarter crosswise into one-eighth-inch-thick slices. Toss them with the celery root, making sure they have just enough cider vinegar to coat.

3. Fold the currants and the pecans into the slaw.

4. In a small bowl, whisk together the sour cream, horseradish, Dijon mustard, sugar and 1 tablespoon plus one-half teaspoon cider vinegar. Season with 1 teaspoon salt and several grinds of pepper, or to taste. Gently fold the dressing into the slaw. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours for the flavors to develop. The slaw will keep for up to 2 days, refrigerated.

Each serving: 234 calories; 4 grams protein; 27 grams carbohydrates; 5 grams fiber; 14 grams fat; 4 grams saturated fat; 10 mg. cholesterol; 404 mg. sodium.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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