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(Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)

Why: Because these buildings go together like Boudin bread and Ghirardelli chocolate.

What: As an emblem of aggressive modernity, San Francisco's Transamerica Pyramid made a lot of enemies when it rose from the Financial District in 1972, but now it's the 853-foot needle we count on seeing.

Its neighbor, clad in green copper, is the Sentinel Building (a.k.a. Coppola's Cupola, a.k.a. Columbus Tower), completed in 1907, bought in 1972 by filmmaker and wine guy Francis Ford Coppola. Stand in the right spot near Kearny Street and Columbus Avenue, the main drag of North Beach, and you can put them together in one architecturally potent picture. Can L.A. or San Diego match this spectacle?

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  • Family-friendly
  • S.F. Bay Area
(Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)

Why: Before you give up on Fisherman's Wharf entirely, you should spend a few minutes playing the quaint old games in the Musée Mécanique. It's basically a dim, din-filled warehouse on Pier 45 that's packed full of arcade games, antique mechanical toys and musical instruments from decades past.

What: You could call this place an old arcade. But why not think of it as a mechanical memory rehabilitation tool? If your childhood happened any time before the Reagan administration, there's probably a game in here that will take you back to it. Some contraptions go back to the 19th century.

(Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)

It is possible that you, or someone you love, would rather roam the souvenir shops of Jefferson Street or the tourist-oriented retailers and restaurateurs of Pier 39. But I'm betting somebody in your family would rather take refuge in the shadows of Pier 45 with a fistful of quarters.

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  • Family-friendly
  • S.F. Bay Area
(Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)

Why: It's a pirate supply store. It's a charity. It's ... oh, just go inside and enjoy.

What: 826 Valencia sells itself as a pirate supply shop, complete with eye patches, handy jars of Scurvy Begone a retail showroom full of pillage-worthy merchandise. But the real business is in back. It's a nonprofit educational outfit that tutors kids (ages 6-18) in creative writing. The founders are author Dave Eggers and educator Nínive Calegari. 

(Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)

The enterprise, born in San Francisco in 2002, has now grown into a national organization with tentacles in several U.S. cities and implausible retail cover story in place for each. (L.A. has a time-travel shop, Boston a Bigfoot research institute.) 

  • Family-friendly
  • S.F. Bay Area
Coit Tower, illuminated in red, March 2017.
Coit Tower, illuminated in red, March 2017. (Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)

Why: It's a triple-threat atop Telegraph Hill. And that's not even counting the parrots.

What: Coit Tower went up in 1933. Even if the wraparound views from the top of the tower weren't spectacular (and they are), the recently restored murals on the ground floor are a witty, provocative window into the hard times and lefty politics of the 1930s, well worth the price of admission by themselves. And if you want some exercise, you can earn your views by starting at the foot of the Filbert Steps and climbing to the tower (which has an elevator).

On your way, stay alert for a dire, shrieking sound. That would be the parrots. They're famous, locally and beyond, for perching and conversing in the trees on and around Telegraph Hill.

(Christopher Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)
  • Family-friendly
  • Orange County
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Why: With a faux waterfall, rally monkeys and a family-friendly vibe, Angel Stadium feels of a piece with nearby Disneyland and Knott’s Berry Farm. The most G-rated sports venue in Southern California, the Big A earns additional points for allowing tailgating in the parking lot before games -- no alcohol or charcoal but propane grills are OK. Once inside, fans get a chance to cheer Albert Pujols, Mike Trout and (as of 2018) Shohei Ohtani, three of the best the game has every seen.

What: Angel Stadium has been home to the Angels since 1966, after they moved from Los Angeles. The stadium has served many purposes, including as home to the NFL Rams, but now is configured as a baseball-specific venue. Darkly handsome and well maintained, the stadium invites exploration and whimsy. In particular, the outfield area behind the rocks has an assortment of comfort foods and craft beers as well as picnic area open to all fans.

As ballpark experiences go, Angel Stadium doesn’t have the history or cathedral-like reverence of Fenway and Wrigley. What it does offer is a good value, a bouncy audience and a cheerful staff that, unlike some other SoCal sports venues, is personable and professional. For pre- and postgame celebrations, a series of familiar restaurants is within walking distance.

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(Getty Images)

Why: Sometimes, it’s like looking out at the North Sea. Montaña de Oro State Park is misty 1,400-foot bluffs, crashing waves and wildlife. If you’re looking to hike California's craggy jawline, or for a moody place to paint, pack your favorite old sweater and head off to this dramatic beach campground. 

What: Montaña de Oro State Park is a half day’s drive north of Los Angeles, near Morro Bay.  The park's main, 50-site campground offers primitive sites with picnic tables, fire pits, toilets and nearby drinking water for car campers. The park's hike-in environmental sites have pit toilets and picnic tables but no water. Spooner's Cove is the most popular beach, right across from the campground. Dogs are permitted in campsites and on park roads and must be on a leash no longer than six feet.  Except for Spooner’s Cove, dogs are not allowed on the trails or beaches.

Be sure to bring your own firewood or buy at the camp host site (campsite 22). Campsites 18, 19, 20 are closest to the beach; 40, 41 and 42 offer a little more privacy. Interested in having an RV delivered to your site? Paso Robles RV Rentals is the approved vendor: (888) 898-2267

  • L.A. County
Central Library rotunda
Central Library rotunda (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

Why: Though some describe L.A.’s architectural aesthetic as “diseased,” there are pockets of taste and splendor. The Central Library, born in 1926, is such an oasis. It’s the sort of marbled cultural sanctuary where Aristotle might’ve wandered at will. You should too.  

What: The original Central Library is an early example of Art Deco, a popular style of architecture from the mid-1920s through the 1930s. It was designed by Bertram Goodhue, in the last project of a career that included the Nebraska Capitol. He died unexpectedly in 1924, and Carleton Winslow took over and completed the project in 1926. After a long renovation, the Central Library was reopened in 1993, with the landmark Goodhue Building restored and a new wing named for former Mayor Tom Bradley. During the renovation, most of the library’s collection was moved to the new Tom Bradley Wing, and the original library building is now given over primarily to exhibitions, reader services and administration.

Adding life and beauty to the facility is a series of sculptures, paintings, historical murals and a magnificent rotunda featuring the Zodiac Chandelier. The adjacent Maguire Gardens are one of downtown’s top outdoor spaces -- shady and thick with fountains.

  • Family-friendly
  • High Sierra
Emerald Bay
Emerald Bay (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Why: Feeling blue? Head to Lake Tahoe, where that color has so many shades -- from dark Levi to pale baby blanket – that it is sure to cheer you. Better yet, rent a kayak or a canoe and dip your toes in one of the most lovely lakes in the world. Amazing beaches ring the lake, but at some point head south to Emerald Bay, to my mind the most dazzling freshwater cove in California.

What: Lake Tahoe is a large Sierra lake resting between California and Nevada. The north shore is anchored by Tahoe City, a bustling resort town with an array of restaurants, inns and a launch point for Truckee River float trips. It also features marinas with boat rentals, some pretty pricey. But boat rental shops dot the lake. A wonderful pit stop for food and drink is the deck at Sunnyside Resort, on the west side of the lake.

On the southwest shore, Emerald Bay State Park contains the 1929 Nordic-style mansion Vikingsholm, and the "Tea House" on Fannette Island, the only island to be found in all of Lake Tahoe.

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  • L.A. County
John Goodman.
John Goodman. (Associated Press)

Why: The Hollywood Walk of Fame is L.A.’s version of Times Square -- with more to do. A celebration of celebrities, it features sidewalk stars honoring entertainment legends and a series of entertainment-themed attractions: a wax museum, some wonderful vintage theaters and the site of the Oscars.

What: The Walk of Fame is a public sidewalk in the heart of Hollywood that runs on both Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street. It also has come to complement a series of nearby attractions, such as Madame Tussauds wax museum, the Hollywood & Highland mall and a series of tourist-themed shops and kiosks. Jimmy Kimmel tapes his show across the street, near the gloriously restored El Capitan Theatre. If your timing is right, you can catch the unveiling of a new sidewalk star.  About two stars are added each month, and the Walk of Fame keeps a schedule on its website. Fans can view the free star ceremony from a public viewing area on a first-come, first-served basis. While you're here, you can catch almost any kind of tour, climb the stairs to the nearby mall for a keepsake photo of the Hollywood sign or see some stars' handprints and footprints at the Chinese Theater formerly known as Grauman’s (these days, it's officially the TCL Chinese Theatre). The walk features more than 2,600 stars now, from Bud Abbott to Adolph Zukor. So take your shoes off and stay a while.

Where: Corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, 6801 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, 8 miles northwest of downtown L.A.

  • L.A. County
Gin Ling Way, Chinatown.
Gin Ling Way, Chinatown. (Jay Clendenin/Los Angeles Times)

Why: L.A.’s Chinatown has a past. Transplanted from its original venue 80 years ago, the neighborhood northeast of downtown retains an authentic vibe, in a region otherwise threatened with mass gentrification. It is famously notorious in the classic Jack Nicholson movie "Chinatown," but today it is a relatively safe, wonderfully scented and an easy-to-navigate stretch of shops and vast dim sum houses.

What: Chinatown was bumped to its current location in the 1930s, to allow for the building of the opulent Union Station. Today, it features restaurants, groceries, herbal shops and galleries. Amid its various attractions are a jazz club; a Cajun deli; a growing number of art galleries; many Vietnamese restaurants; and L.A.’s favorite French dip sandwich shop, Philippe the Original.

It also features an even better lunch spot, Howlin’ Ray’s, a Nashville-style fried chicken joint that serves, to my mind, the best (and spiciest) sandwich in Los Angeles. Needless to say, it is hardly one thing.