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Seized Files Reportedly Detail Plans to Bomb White House Facility

Associated Press

Files seized in a Baltimore apartment used by self-proclaimed revolutionaries contain detailed plans to bomb the Old Executive Office Building in the White House complex, the Associated Press has learned.

Documents found in a file drawer marked “in progress” also include “very detailed” plans to bomb up to a dozen other federal offices in the Washington area and a building at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., an assistant U.S. attorney in Baltimore said.

Evidence seized by the FBI links groups whose members used the apartment to radical organizations suspected of 16 bombings since 1982, including one in November, 1983, at the U.S. Capitol, the prosecutor said.

Investigators said the FBI also found explosives, timers, weapons, stolen cars, cash and false identity papers in recent raids there and at other suspected “safe houses” and garages in Pennsylvania, New York and Connecticut.

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“It could be that we just got lucky and happened to catch them on the brink of a wave of attacks,” said Barbara S. Sale, an assistant U.S. attorney in Baltimore. “Or it could be that this planning stage went on and on.” No timetable was found, she said.

The raids stemmed from the arrest May 11 of Marilyn Jean Buck, wanted in a botched 1981 Brink’s armored car holdup north of New York in which a guard and two police officers were killed. Prosecutors say the holdup was carried out by a coalition of radical political groups.

Material seized in the New York “safe house” raid last month included an aerial photograph of a Westchester County prison, where Brink’s case convicts Kathy Boudin and Judith Gilbert are being held, prosecutors said.

Sale said one plan found in Baltimore diagrammed the Old Executive Office Building, which is located within the 18 1/2-acre White House complex and houses administration offices including an office of Vice President George Bush and the Office of Management and Budget. She declined to say whether a specific target on the diagram was marked.

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