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WHERE THEY ARE NOW

CHARLES H. KEATING, Jr.

S&L; owner

Recently rebuffed in his attempt to regain control of Lincoln Savings, Keating quit last month as chief executive of American Continental, Lincoln’s former owner. The resignation came after a federal judge accused Keating of looting the now-insolvent thrift. The 66-year-old financier, who lives in Phoenix, says he’s broke.

DON RAY DIXON

S&L; owner

Perhaps the highest of the high-fliers, Dixon, 50, was a real estate developer who bought control of tiny Vernon Savings in north Texas in 1982 and used it to finance a regal lifestyle. He pleaded not guilty to misusing thrift funds for campaign contributions and prostitutes. Was last believed to be operating out of a small office on Coast Highway in Laguna Beach.

RICHARD T. PRATT

Regulator

As Federal Home Loan Bank Board chairman from 1981 to 1983, he urged deregulation and opened the way for questionable accounting methods that disguised thrifts’ true condition. Now says he regrets what he did on the accounting front. Pratt, 53, is chairman of a mortgage capital subsidiary for Merrill Lynch & Co.

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EDWIN J. GRAY

Regulator

Chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board from 1983 to 1987, Gray sounded the alarm about the thrift crisis, but few listened. Viewed as a hero by some, a bumbler by others. Gray, 55, is now president of a savings and loan in Miami.

M. DANNY WALL

Regulator

The last chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, Wall quit in March under mounting criticism from Congress for his handling of the thrift crisis. Accused of badly underestimating the scope of the S&L; crisis, Wall, 51, now works out of his Virginia home as a consultant and speech-maker.

DONALD T. REGAN

Government official

Former treasury secretary and chief of staff under President Reagan, he was a strong free-market advocate who cared little for the thrift industry. His philosophy of deregulation for the S&Ls; prevailed. Regan, 71, has homes in Virginia and Florida, and spends his time writing, lecturing and managing his investments.

JIM WRIGHT

Politician

After 34 years in Congress, Wright resigned as House Speaker last year after being accused of repeated ethics violations. Wright interceded with federal regulators in an effort to delay a government seizure of Vernon Savings. A resident of Ft. Worth, Wright, 67, is writing a book on Central America.

TONY COELHO

Politician

The former House majority whip abruptly resigned from Congress in 1989 after failing to disclose a $50,000 loan from now-insolvent Columbia Savings in Beverly Hills. He used the loan to purchase a junk bond. Coelho, 47, is now a managing director of Wertheim Schroder & Co., a New York investment-

banking firm.


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