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The Longest Jump

Bob Beamons’ leap of 29 feet 2 1/2 inches at the 1968 Olympics was considered by many a fluke in the thin air of Mexico City. After all, he broke the previous mark by almost two feet. Carl lewis had crept up on it over the years, and Robert Emmiyan of the Soviet Union jumped 29-1 in 1987, but no one could have been prepared for what happened Friday at Tokyo when Mike Powell, on his second-to-last attempt, jumped 29-4 1/2. Lewis was almost as incredible with three consecutive leaps of 29 feet or more. powell ended Lewis’ 10-year winning streak in the event and put his hame in the record books. Here is a look at each of their six attempts:

1 2 3 4 Mike Powell 25-8 1/2 28-0 1/4 27-2 1/2 Foul Carl Lewis 28-5 3/4 Foul *28-11 3/4 *29-2 3/4

For the record:
12:00 AM, Sep. 01, 1991 For the Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday September 1, 1991 Home Edition Sports Part C Page 13 Column 5 Sports Desk 1 inches; 19 words Type of Material: Correction
Track--A chart in Saturday’s editions incorrectly listed the date of Jesse Owens’ long jump record. He leaped 26-8 1/4 on May 25, 1935.

5 6 Mike Powell 29-4 1/2 Foul Carl Lewis 29-1 1/4 29-0

* wind-aided Long Jump Progression The progression of the men’s long jump world record, as recognized by the International Amateur Athletic Federation, track and field’s worldwide governing body since 1901, with date, distance, record hold and site:

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May 5, 1935 -- 26-8 1/4, Jesse Owens, United States, at Ann Arbor, Mich.

Aug. 12, 1960 -- 26-11 1/4, Ralph Boston, United States, at Walnut, Calif.

May 27, 1961 -- 27-0 1/2, Ralph Boston, United States, at Modesto, Calif.

July 16, 1961 -- 27-2, Ralph Boston, United States, at Moscow.

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June 10, 1962 -- 27-3 1/4, Igor Ter-Ovanesyan, Soviet Union, at Yerevan, Soviet Union.

Aug. 15, 1964 -- 27-3 1/4, Ralph Boston, United States, at Kingston, Jamaica.

Sept. 12, 1964 - 27-4 1/2, Ralph Boston, United States, at Los Angeles.

May 29, 1965 -- 27-4 3/4, Ralph Boston, United States, at Modesto, Calif.

Oct. 19, 1967 -- 27-4 3/4, Igor Ter-Ovanesyan, Soviet Union, at Mexico City.

Oct. 18, 1968 -- 29-2 1/2, Bob Beamon, United States, at Mexico City.

Aug. 30, 1991 -- 29-4 1/2, Mike Powell, United States, at Tokyo.


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