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Robert C. Maynard

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said that “the ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” Regardless of the odds, the strength of the foe or how entrenched and imposing the barrier, Bob Maynard always stood unflinchingly tall for a free and objective press, journalistic and personal integrity, diversity in the workplace and above all protecting the interest of the “little guy.”

His place in history as a pioneer is secure, but the ultimate measure of his legacy will be defined by the willingness of his students, journalists, executives and others he touched through personal deeds to practice what he preached and by transmitting his ideals and principles to future generations.

JOHN L. BURRIS

Oakland

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* The glowing eulogies to the accomplishments of Robert C. Maynard, who died Aug. 17, are meaningful to many people who did not have access to his newspaper, the Oakland Tribune, were not personally affected by his crusade for integration in newsrooms, and were not aware that he launched the Institute for Journalism Education and became a mentor for thousands of minority reporters, editors and newspaper managers.

Many ordinary people knew about Maynard because of his TV exposure as an occasional commentator on “This Week With David Brinkley.” Viewers were impressed with his thoughtful and concise comments delivered in his sonorous voice and occasionally spiced with flashes of humor. He was greatly admired.

LOUISE HAUTER

La Canada

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