GOP Transition in Congress

Jan. 4, the day for which I have waited for more than 25 years--ever since I woke up and changed from a former West Virginia Democrat to an enlightened Republican! The three hours spent watching the inspiring formalities in the House of Representatives restored my faith in our ability to recapture our government.

As an 80-year-old retired legal secretary, intensely interested in the welfare and well-being of our beloved country, I watched the faces of people in the House as our new Speaker outlined his vision for restoring America to its former greatness. Most faces had a hopeful expression, except one prominent Democrat (who shall be nameless), whose face mirrored his hatred and envy as he sat stiffly in his seat. Even Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.) didn't look too unhappy! Anyhow, it was a great day, and I want to express my appreciation to all the hard-working Republicans who helped us to take back our country! Lastly, I want to especially thank Hillary Rodham Clinton, because it was her flagrantly socialistic medical plan that was the final straw needed to galvanize the voters who gave us the tremendous victory. God bless America!

EVA J. LONDEREE

Huntington Beach

* House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) in his acceptance speech gave us a history lesson on the way he understands American history. I would like to tell him that all the newspapers in the U.S. on Nov. 6, 1946, hailed the great Republican victory in the Congress. The GOP plan: Tax cuts, balanced budget, remove controls from business. This was the 80th Congress. At the end of the two-year Republican landslide, this Congress was known as the "do-nothing Congress" and voted out of office. Is the country in for a replay? Time will tell.

LEO FRIEDMAN

Mission Viejo

* Reading Speaker Gingrich's suggestion that the poor be given laptops to bring them into the Information Age (Jan. 6) sounded vaguely familiar. It hit me about a half-hour later. As a history professor, Gingrich should have cited his source, Marie Antoinette, who is credited with saying, "Let them eat cake."

JUDY ARONSON

Woodland Hills

* Re "Live, on TV! Watch Newt's Housework!," Column Left, Jan. 8:

It is difficult to understand Robert Scheer's and the congressional Democrats' complaints. After controlling the House for 40 years, they found religion on lobbying reform just last year. The bill they pulled together was vintage Democratic Party legislation. It was a bill with very ambiguous language, designed to allow unelected bureaucrats and judges decide what the law meant. Now the Democrats, and their shills in the media like Scheer, are outraged when, after two whole days in the majority, the Republicans have done nothing about lobbying reform.

Scheer and his friends on the left have much to concern them. The taxpayers of America have started voting with a vengeance, and the programs designed and propagated by the liberals are in deep trouble. They are reduced to whining about what Gingrich's mother says he said, and not doing in one week what the Democrats couldn't do in 40 years. Give them time, Mr. Scheer, the 40-year bender just ended, and it is going to take some time to clean up.

CHRIS HAYDEN

Costa Mesa

* The new Republican Congress apparently intends to keep for itself in Washington those programs which benefit the rich and affluent such as tax breaks, loopholes, subsidies and such other benefits as may be purchased by campaign money.

The programs which benefit the poor and needy will be turned over to the states, where there is less money available.

BENITA LAWRENCE

Los Angeles

* Two lessons we have learned after one week of a Republican-controlled Congress:

* It's imperative to pass the balanced-budget amendment first, so when you cut Social Security and Medicare, etc., by 25%, you are not responsible. "It's the law that made you do it."

* Reelection will be assured because of your assurance to the white males of America that you will continue to move America back to the 19th Century. (Evidently American-male "manliness" depends on the subjugation of all other groups.)

FAY DEEN DOYEN

West Hills

* Let me see if I understand this. The Republican Congress is going to reduce my taxes to stimulate the economy. Then Alan Greenspan will raise interest rates to slow the economy and we will be back to square one.

The best thing that could happen for the middle class (I hate that buzzword--I prefer middle income ) would be to reduce interest rates two points. Then everyone would have more money, including all the branches of the government that have to borrow money.

JOHN T. VANDERSLIK

Cayucos

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