Microsoft's Antitrust Battles

Here is a chronology of the antitrust actions involving Microsoft:

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June 1990: Federal Trade Commission secretly investigates possible collusion between Microsoft and IBM.

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Feb. 1993: FTC takes no action, closes investigation after commissioners deadlock.

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Aug. 1993: Justice Dept. takes over Microsoft investigation.

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July 1994: Company signs consent decree agreeing to change contracts with PC makers and eliminate some restrictions on other software makers.

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Aug. 1995: After a judge throws out the decree which is later reinstated by the Appeals Court, U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson approves the decree.

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Oct. 1997: Justice Dept. sues Microsoft, alleging it violated the 1994 consent decree.

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May 1998: Justice Dept. and state regulators file landmark antitrust suit against Microsoft.

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Oct. 1998: Antitrust trial begins before Judge Jackson.

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Nov. 1999: Jackson releases preliminary findings, labeling Microsoft a monopoly that has used its position to harm competition and consumers.

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Jan. 2000: Steven Ballmer named CEO, succeeding Gates, who becomes chairman and chief software architect.

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April 2000: Settlement efforts collapse. Jackson finds Microsoft in violation of antitrust laws. Justice Dept. urges court to split Microsoft into two companies.

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May 2000: Fighting the proposed breakup, company submits its own plan, which includes changes in its business practices.

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June 2000: Jackson orders the company be split into two companies.

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June 2001: Federal appeals panel reverses Jackson's breakup order but rules that Microsoft violated antitrust laws.

Researched by NONA YATES / Los Angeles Times

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