Advertisement

Women likelier to forgo healthcare

From Times staff and wire reports

U.S. women with health insurance are more likely than men to go without needed care because of higher premiums and related costs, a study has found. A larger percentage of women also have trouble paying their medical bills.

More women didn’t fill prescriptions, skipped recommended visits with specialists, failed to get tests or just didn’t seek treatment when they had a medical problem, according to a national survey by the Commonwealth Fund, a private New York-based group that supports research on health and social issues.

For the record:

12:00 AM, Apr. 30, 2007 For The Record
Los Angeles Times Tuesday April 24, 2007 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 1 inches; 35 words Type of Material: Correction
Women and healthcare: A Monday Health section article about a Commonwealth Fund healthcare report included a reference to 16 million uninsured adults in the U.S. The report said that almost 16 million adults are underinsured.
For The Record
Los Angeles Times Monday April 30, 2007 Home Edition Health Part F Page 7 Features Desk 1 inches; 34 words Type of Material: Correction
Women and healthcare: An April 23 article about a Commonwealth Fund healthcare report included a reference to 16 million uninsured adults in the U.S. The report stated that almost 16 million adults are underinsured.

Other studies have suggested that women typically pay more for healthcare because they need more routine exams, such as those related to pregnancy. These issues should be part of the national healthcare debate as employers switch to plans with higher deductibles and policy makers look for flexible, lower-cost options for the almost 16 million uninsured adults, the report said.

Politicians and advocates “should ensure that any proposal provides comprehensive benefits and low cost-sharing,” said Judith Waxman, vice president of the Washington, D.C.-based National Women’s Law Center, in a statement. Waxman co-wrote the report with Elizabeth Patchias, a health policy analyst at the center.

Advertisement

To read the report, go to www.cmwf.org.


Advertisement