WWII
21 Images

An Era of Aviation

WWII
WWII
Workers inspect nose cones of planes at Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach, Calif., during World War II. (LAT)
1964
1964
Donald W. Douglas Jr., left, and Jackson R. McGowen, vice president and general manager, drive the first rivet in a DC-9 cockpit enclosure, signaling the start of assembly of the jetliner in Long Beach, Calif. (Douglas Aircraft Co.)
1969
1969
The full-scale production mock up of the 300-passenger DC-10 jet airliner nears completion at McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s Douglas Aircraft Co. in Long Beach, Calif. The model was designed to serve as a test bed for installation of every part and system that goes into the actual aircraft. The model was 180-feet long and had a 20-foot fuselage diameter. The plane was to enter airline service late in 1971. (LAT)
1989
1989
MD-11 Jet #1 under construction at McDonnell Douglas in Long Beach, Calif. (LAT)
1993
1993
An MD C-17 under construction at McDonnell Douglas plant in Long Beach, Calif. Boeing announced a $13.3 billion deal on Dec. 15, 1996 to buy McDonnell Douglas. (AP)
1993
1993
C-17 cargo jets in assembly hangar at McDonnell Douglas’ Long Beach, Calif., factory. (AP)
1996
1996
About 3,000 people gathered to welcome President Clinton at McDonnell Douglas in Long Beach, Calif., where he was presented with the keys to a new C-17 aircraft. (Carolyn Cole / LAT)
1998
1998
Boeing’s office on Lakewood Boulevard in Long Beach, Calif. (Glenn Koenig / LAT)
1998
1998
Boeing employees work on the tail section of an MD-11 at the company’s Long Beach, Calif., plant. Boeing announced in December that it was laying off an additional 20,000 employees as orders reduced after the Asian financial crisis. Earlier in the year, the company said 28,000 jobs would be eliminated through the end of 1999. (Nick Ut / AP)
2000
2000
Boeing’s 717 aircraft manufacturing line in Long Beach, Calif. (Lawrence K. Ho / LAT)
2001
2001
A sign above Boeing’s facility in Long Beach, Calif., promotes the company’s 717 airplane. Boeing opted in December 2001 to scale back production of its money-losing 717 airplane rather than scrap the program, and predicted a whopping $700 million in fourth-quarter charges stemming mostly from the Sept. 11 attacks. (Kim D. Johnson / AP)
2001
2001
Southern California Professional Engineering Association Executive Board Secretary Michael Jones displays a T-shirt to the crowd of Boeing engineers who gathered for a protest at the company’s Long Beach facility. (LAT)
2002
2002
Boeing workers gather inside a hangar at the Long Beach Airport for the delivery of the 100th C-17 military transport jet. (Luis Sinco / LAT)
2002
2002
Three C-17’s are assembled at Boeing’s 1.1 million square-foot Long Beach, Calif., facility. (Richard Hartog / LAT)
2002
2002
U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III’s are shown in final assembly at the Boeing facility in Long Beach, Calif. (Boeing)
2002
2002
Boeing workers gather inside a hangar at the Long Beach Airport to celebrate the delivery of the 100th C-17 military transport jet. (Luis Sinco / LAT)
2004
2004
This bell is rung when new orders come in at Boeing’s plant in Long Beach, Calif. (Ricardo DeAratanha / LAT)
2005
2005
Two fuselages from a C-17 military cargo plane can be seen at the Boeing facility in Long Beach, Calif. (Lori Shepler / LAT)
2005
2005
A C-17 military cargo plane is shown being assembled at the Boeing facility in Long Beach, Calif. (Lori Shepler / LAT)
2005
2005
One of the new C-17 military cargo planes that was assembled at the Boeing’s facility in Long Beach, Calif., is readied for tests. (Lori Shepler / LAT)
2005
2005
Master Sgt. Ray Ganotoise of the Hawaii National Guard blesses one of the C-17 military cargo planes being assembled at the Boeing’s facility in Long Beach, Calif. The planes are scheduled to be delivered to Hawaii. Ganotoise is also a priest. (Lori Shepler / LAT)
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