Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
6 Images

Stealth F-117A Night Hawk

Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
An F-117A is shown on display at an air show in Point Mugu. The Air Force’s fleet of Night Hawk stealth fighters were built in secret in the 1980s by Lockheed’s famed Skunk Works division when the facility was located in Burbank. With the introduction of the stealthier F-22 in 2006, the Pentagon decided to retire its fleet of F-117s. (Bryan Chan / Los Angeles Times)
Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
An F-117 on a training mission. The single-seat jet was the first plane that could evade radar detection. (U.S. Air Force)
Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
An F-117 refuels mid-air. During its ultra-secret development, the aircraft flew only at night to avoid detection from Soviet spy satellites and others, thus its name Night Hawk. (U.S. Air Force)
Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
Two F-117A fighters fly in formation alongside a KC-135 aerial refueling tanker over Edwards Air Force Base. The planes cost $45 million each, and 59 were ultimately built. (Los Angeles Times)
Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
A Night Hawk touches down at Kunsan Air Base in South Korea in 2003 as part of a combined training exercise involving the U.S. and South Korea. The 117s were among the first aircraft to strike targets in the Persian Gulf War in 1991 and in the invasion of Iraq in 2003. (Agence France-Presse)
Stealth B-117A Night Hawk
Maintenance personnel inspect an F-117 shortly after it landed at an Air Force base. The aircraft is still so cloaked in mystery that only employees and retirees who worked on the program were invited to its retirement ceremony. (Al Berman / Associated Press)
1/6