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Designer Kathryn M. Ireland looks to sell in Santa Monica

Noted interior designer Kathryn M. Ireland is selling her Santa Monica home herself.
Noted interior designer Kathryn M. Ireland is selling her Santa Monica home herself. Formerly owned by actor Tobey Maguire, the small compound is for sale at $4.995 million.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

On to her next project. English decorator-designer Kathryn M. Ireland has put her Santa Monica home of three years up for sale at $4.995 million.

Formerly owned by actor-producer Tobey Maguire, the breezy compound consists of a reimagined 1920s bungalow, a guest house and a two-story building that Ireland uses as a live-work space.

The bungalow, previously renovated by architect Ruben Ojeda, features high ceilings and custom iron doors that open to a central courtyard. A total of two bedrooms include a full-floor primary suite and a second en suite. A third bedroom, which opens to a terrace, was converted into a dressing room.

Celebrity interior and textile designer Kathryn M. Ireland is shown at her home in Santa Monica.
Celebrity interior and textile designer Kathryn M. Ireland is shown at her home in Santa Monica.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
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The three structures surround the courtyard, which was transformed by Ireland into a bohemian garden setting filled with drought-tolerant and tropical plantings.

Ireland, who is handling the listing herself, is selling because she’s turning her attention to an oceanfront project on the East Coast. She asks that inquiries about the home be sent to her son and business partner, Otis Weis.

Ireland got her start in interior design in the 1980s after moving to Los Angeles. Her signature style, which she describes as “English country meets California beach life,” has made her a household name in the design world. Last year, she launched the new website the Perfect Room, which features curated spaces by Ireland as well as Martyn Lawrence Bullard and Rachel Ashwell.

The two-story building is used as a live-work space.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
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