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Emmy Awards: HBO, Jon Hamm and Viola Davis win big

At the 67th Emmy Awards, HBO's "Veep" won for best comedy series, and its "Game of Thrones" won for best drama series. HBO's "Olive Kitteridge" also cleaned up with six wins. Jon Hamm has finally won for lead actor in a drama for "Mad Men" after many nominations, and Viola Davis became the first African American woman to win for lead actress in a drama.

The Times was there from start to end, chronicling the preparations, fashions, wins, losses, memorable moments and emotional reactions. Take a look.

Serious fandom at the top of the red carpet

How this Emmys made history

 (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Viola Davis accepts the award for lead actress in a drama. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Viola Davis made history Sunday as the first African American to win lead actress in a drama. Combined with Uzo Aduba's and Regina King's wins earlier in the evening, the three victories for African American actresses ties a record set in 1991 for most acting Emmys awarded to black women in a single year.

"Game of Thrones" also made some Emmys history. Combined with the Creative Emmys it took home last week, the series won 12 Emmy Awards this year (including its first for drama series), which is the most any series has won in a single year.

Jon Hamm isn't bitter it took this long

 (Paul Buck / EPA)

(Paul Buck / EPA)

There are so many incredible people and incredible work that has been recognized over my own, and I can't hold a grudge at all. You go back and look back at who's won. ... It's not like they gave it to some guy off the street. ... Look at all the people I'm sitting next to, look at all the people I'm in a list with. You gotta be kidding me.

'Veep' creator on leaving the series

 (Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

(Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

"Veep" creator Armando Iannucci is leaving the HBO comedy, but he won't be empty-handed. The show celebrated its first Emmy for comedy series, beating out five-time winner "Modern Family."

"It feels like the right time," Iannucci told reporters in the press room after the awards show on Sunday night. "I felt that I've taken the show to where I wanted to take it and I'm pleased to pass it on. ...Every show can benefit from new energy."

All the photos from the Emmys

 (Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

(Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

Check out the photo gallery capturing highlights from the Emmy telecast.

You can also see all of the photos from the red carpet here .

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Fashion moment of the evening?

 (Associated Press)

(Associated Press)

Jon Stewart on his last days on 'The Daily Show'

 (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

I think we were just trying to get the shows done without being too circumspect so that we didn't get melancholy. It was just more let's enjoy each other's company, do the best shows that we can and push to the end. I don't think we reflected on it a whole lot until after 'Born to Run.'
Jon Stewart

The final tally: HBO wins huge

HBO snagged 14 wins -- 10 more than the next biggest winner, Comedy Central, which had four wins.

Regina King's disbelief

 (Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

(Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

"Did they get that right? Did they really say that?"

Those were Regina King's first thoughts when they announced she had won the Emmy on Sunday for supporting actress in a limited series or movie for her role as Aliyah Shadeed in "American Crime."

"I'm still kind of digesting it," the actress said in the press room after the ceremony on Sunday.

As far as celebrating goes, King said her plans entail taking off her heels and grabbing a drink.

"I think I'm going to have a martini, two times."

She also plans to send her Emmy "some way, somehow" to Cincinnati, where her mom and grandma live.

"I think that's the best place for her," she said, referring to her statuette.

Amy Schumer's Emmy memories

 (Jason Merritt / Getty Images)

(Jason Merritt / Getty Images)

Ask Amy Schumer about it, and the 2015 Emmy Awards will be a memorable night for two reasons.

1) Her Comedy Central show "Inside Amy Schumer" won an Emmy Sunday night for best sketch comedy series.

2) But a moment that was also a favorite, she says, is presenting with Amy Poehler.

"She's the best," Schumer told reporters backstage, when she wasn't humorously seeming interested in the publications they work for. "That I could stand there and talk ... with her and Tina [Fey] during the commercial break -- my life's a dream right now.

"And this moment," she deadpanned.

So how does the comedian plan to spend her night?

"I think you know how I'll be celebrating tonight ... I'm going to black out."

When one reporter asked if she might make out with anyone famous in that state, like, say, Fey, with whom she locked lips earlier this summer at the Peabody Awards, Schumer didn't limit the possibilities to just Fey.

"Honestly, anyone who's willing," she said. "I brought my own lube. I don't know if that's something that interests anyone. Literally, anyone."

Wait, what's 'Olive Kitteridge'?

 (Jojo Whilden / HBO)

(Jojo Whilden / HBO)

The HBO miniseries "Olive Kitteridge" cleaned up tonight with six Emmy wins, including one for Frances McDormand, who brought the project to HBO and played the title character.

Not to oversell it, but here's what Times TV critic Mary McNamara wrote after watching it:

"Literally; when this lovely, ruthless, masterfully restrained two-night, four-hour contemplation of love, marriage, parenthood, mental illness and identity came to an end, I stood up. There was no one physically present to applaud and I felt I had to do something."

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Tracy Morgan's triumphant return to the Emmys

Tracy Morgan returned to the Emmys after a devastating car accident in June 2014 nearly took his life. Morgan presented the Emmy for drama series to "Game of Thrones" and cracked several jokes during the presentation, suggesting that he's well on his way to returning to his irreverent ways.

Morgan was nominated for supporting actor in a comedy series in 2009 for his work as Tracy Jordan on "30 Rock."

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These women are excited for Viola Davis

Thank you HBO for believing in dragons.
David Benioff for "Game of Thrones," winner for drama series

Winner: 'Game of Thrones' for drama series

 (Helen Sloan / HBO)

(Helen Sloan / HBO)

“Game of Thrones” has won the Emmy for drama series, marking the first victory in this category for the HBO hit.

Based on fantasy novels by author George R.R. Martin and created by D.B. Weiss and David Benioff, “Game of Thrones” depicts the violent power struggles between warring factions in the imaginary Seven Kingdoms of Westeros. The intensely bloody and densely plotted epic wrapped its fifth season on HBO in June and has become the network's most-watched series. Its large ensemble cast includes Emmy nominees Lena Headey, Peter Dinklage and Emilia Clarke.

Despite backlash over its frequent depictions of sexual violence, "Game of Thrones" received 24 nominations this year, the most of any series. It also took home eight awards at the Creative Arts Emmys on Sept. 12.

The show's victory in one of Emmy's marquee categories represents a major breakthrough for the fantasy genre, which has long fought for awards recognition. It's also HBO's first win in the drama series category since the final season of "The Sopranos" in 2007.

“Game of Thrones” faced increased competition in the drama series category, which was expanded to seven nominees this year. The other contenders were “House of Cards" (Netflix), "Mad Men" (AMC), "Downton Abbey" (PBS), "Homeland" (Showtime), "Orange Is the New Black" and "Better Call Saul" (AMC).

As has been the case since 2012, the four major commercial broadcast networks were shut out of the category.

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I feel like myself again, which means a whole lotta women gonna get pregnant at the after party.
Tracy Morgan

Jon Hamm wins Mad Men's first (and only) acting Emmy

After eight lead actor in a drama Emmy nominations for playing Don Draper on "Mad Men", Jon Hamm has finally taken home the prize.

As notable as it is that this is just Hamm's first Emmy for the role, it's even more interesting to realize that his victory is the first, and only, acting Emmy "Mad Men" ever received.

The show went an astonishing one for 37 in acting categories at the Emmys during its eight years on the air.

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Winner: 'Veep' for comedy series

 (Patrick Harbron / HBO)

(Patrick Harbron / HBO)

HBO's "Veep" has won the Emmy for comedy series, ending the five-year winning streak of ABC's "Modern Family" in the category.

"Veep" began its life in 2012 with Julia Louis-Dreyfus portraying a bumbling, discontented vice president striving to gain more influence with the show's (unseen) president.

This season, the show's fourth, saw Louis-Dreyfus stepping in as U.S. president and struggling to adjust to her newfound power in the White House. Already a critical favorite, the new plot development brought "Veep" even wider acclaim.

Other nominees in the category included "Louie" (FX), "Parks and Recreation” (NBC), "Modern Family" (ABC), "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" (Netflix), "Transparent" (Amazon Studios) and "Silicon Valley" (HBO).

Frances McDormand wants more 'Olive Kitteridge'

 (Mark Davis / Getty Images)

(Mark Davis / Getty Images)

Sure, she just won an Emmy, but Frances McDormand would like to start a social media campaign.

She may have given what seemed the shortest acceptance speech in awards show history, but maybe that's because McDormand is not ready to leave the world of "Olive Kitteridge."

The limited series based on short stories from Elizabeth Strout, which chronicled the titular character's 25-year relationship with her husband, Henry, played out over four installments on HBO. That, frankly, was not enough for McDormand.

"I would like you to all start a social media campaign so we can film more of the short stories from 'Olive Kitteridge,'" she said.

The actress said she championed the initial book-to-TV adaptation so strongly because she found the world Strout brought to life to be "infinitely interesting to read." And it wasn't just the character she took on to critical acclaim that piqued her interest.

"I thought that it could be a great town to spend some time in," McDormand said. "Not necessarily the character [Olive], the whole town of Crosby, Maine."

'In my mind I see a line. And over that line, I see green fields and lovely flowers and beautiful white women with their arms stretched out to me over that line. But I can't seem to get there.' That was Harriet Tubman in the 1800s.
Viola Davis, winner for actress in a drama series

What's the deal with the green ribbons?

Jeffrey Tambor's green ribbon went from his lapel on the red carpet to a spot of honor on his Emmy for lead actor in a comedy series. George R.R. Martin flashed his in the audience. Julia Louis-Dreyfuss reportedly tacked hers to her clutch.

But why?

It's about climate change: The green ribbons are to raise awareness of the Natural Resources Defense Council's efforts to get the Clean Power Plan passed at a federal level.

Not as fun of a mystery as figuring out whether the "Jen" mentioned at the end of Jon Hamm's acceptance speech referred to his longtime partner and recent ex, Jennifer Westfeldt, but hey, at least this mystery is solved.

The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there.
Viola Davis, winner for actress in a drama series

Winner: Viola Davis for lead drama actress

 (Mitchell Haaseth / ABC)

(Mitchell Haaseth / ABC)

Making history, Viola Davis became the first African American to win the Emmy for lead actress in a drama. The victory comes as a result of Davis' work as Annalise Keating, a charismatic and conniving law professor on ABC's “How to Get Away With Murder.”

The Emmy is just the latest of Davis' career accolades, which include two Tonys, three SAG wins and two Oscar nominations.

Isabel Sanford is the only other African American woman to have taken home an Emmy in a lead acting category, which she earned in 1981 for her work on “The Jeffersons.”

“How to Get Away With Murder” returns to ABC for its second season Sept. 24.

The other contenders in the category were Claire Danes for “Homeland” (Showtime), Taraji P. Henson for “Empire” (Fox), Tatiana Maslany for “Orphan Black” (BBC America), Elisabeth Moss for “Mad Men” (AMC) and Robin Wright for “House of Cards” (Netflix).

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Nope. Nope. Nope. There has been a terrible mistake, clearly.
Jon Hamm, winner for actor in a drama series

Winner: Jon Hamm for lead drama actor

 (Justina Mintz / Associated Press)

(Justina Mintz / Associated Press)

Finally, it's Jon Hamm's year at the Emmys.

The 44-year-old "Mad Men" star has won the prize for lead actor in a dramatic series after seven consecutive nominations without a win.

On "Mad Men," Hamm played Don Draper, a New York ad man in the 1960s and early '70s who is tortured by personal demons.

"Mad Men" wrapped a seven-season run on AMC in May. Before today, the show collected 15 Emmys in various categories, including four prizes for best drama.

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Tony Hale on his family

 (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

If given the option, like his fellow winners "Veep" costar Julia Louis-Dreyfus and "Mom's" Allison Janney, Tony Hale would bring his wife, Martel Thompson, to accept his award with him and talk to reporters about it backstage.

"I'd probably bring up my wife because ... I love my wife," the "Veep" actor said. "We've been traveling so much and she really has been a trouper back home. I love my wife."

Hale also said that he's slightly worried about the parallels that might run between his HBO comedy's political story lines and the upcoming presidential election.

"It's funny because I don't feel like the writers are very swayed by [current events] because in past experiences it's been that they've written something and then it's actually happened in the press," he said. "I'm kind of worried about what they're going to write and then it actually happening. That's probably what I'm more worried about. Because it's a satire but then satire turns into life."

Hale also praised his former "Arrested Development" costar for his Emmy win in the ground-breaking Amazon series "Transparent."

"It feels pretty full circle with Jeffrey [Tambor] winning and things," Hale said of "Arrested Development's" resurgence on Sunday. " I was really excited, [producer] Mitch Hurwitz, I was able to say in my speech to thank him because he gave me my first job on 'Arrested Development' and to be able to say that was really special to me and I'm excited about that. And I love Jeffrey Tambor. He's like my TV dad."

In memoriam

 (Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)

(Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)

Among the Television Academy honorees for this year's "In Memoriam" is Leonard Nimoy, who played the transcendent alien on "Star Trek" and died in February at 83. Other notable members of the television community who died this year are listed on the academy's site.

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Uzo Aduba joins Ed Asner in exclusive Emmy club

With her win for supporting actress in a drama, Uzo Aduba joins only Ed Asner in winning a comedy and drama Emmy for playing the same character.

Asner famously pulled off the feat for playing Lou Grant on two shows, sitcom "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," then on the spinoff drama "Lou Grant."

Aduba, conversely, won both of her Emmys for playing Suzanne Warren on "Orange Is the New Black," owing her change in status to the reclassification of the series.

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Jeffrey Tambor shares a special moment

 (Mark Davis / Getty Images)

(Mark Davis / Getty Images)

Jeffrey Tambor said he often gets approached by people who love the Amazon show "Transparent."

But one moment at the Sundance Film Festival particularly stands out for the actor, who took home the Emmy on Sunday night for lead actor in a comedy series for his role as Maura Pfefferman.

"These parents came up to me and said ... their little son was going to play softball and he came home one day and said to his mom and dad, 'I don't want to go back there.' They said 'Why?' He said, 'I'm not a boy boy.' And that changed their lives," Tambor recalled. "They told me they watch 'Transparent' and that gave them confidence."

The actor said he isn't bashful about the Emmy Award because it "is bigger than me."

"It represents what Amazon has done, what the transgender community is doing and what our show is about," Tambor told reporters. "We are the little engine that could. I hope more people watch and get to experience this revolution."

I wasn't prepared at all. I was even chewing gum. I wasn't prepared because the other actors in my category, I'm still sort of awed by all of their performances.
Peter Dinklage, winner for supporting actor in a drama series

Winner: Peter Dinklage for drama supporting actor

 (Helen Sloan / Associated Press)

(Helen Sloan / Associated Press)

Peter Dinklage of "Game of Thrones" wins the Emmy for supporting actor in a drama series.

Jill Soloway talks diversity

 (Jason Merritt / Getty Images)

(Jason Merritt / Getty Images)

Winning a directing award for a show that speaks to the transgender experience is an achievement not lost on Jill Soloway.

The creator of Amazon's "Transparent," the most nominated comedy of the night, took her time backstage to talk about the importance of having diversity behind the camera to bring new, more wide-ranging stories to the forefront.

"I thought a lot about this, especially since this is a directing award, so it speaks to how I see the world as a female," Soloway told reporters. "The more I direct, the more I recognize that directing is kind of litigating for the way I see the world. Straight white men have had their hands on protagonism and the camera for far too long."

She continued: "People who have access to the camera need to be able to share that with women, with people of color, with queer people, especially trans people -- people who really need to see work from their point of view."

Soloway said that diversifying the representations that are on television are key because "when you make television, you're helping people to see how you feel in the world. We need more queer people, more trans people, more people of color, more women behind the camera."

I'm shaking, yes, I'm shaking. That's the deal.
David Nutter, winner for drama series directing for "Game of Thrones"

Winner: David Nutter for drama series directing

David Nutter of "Game of Thrones" wins the Emmy for directing for a drama series.

"I really just want to say thank you a thousand times. If I could say thank you a thousand times, it would not be enough to cover the amount of thanks I feel."
Uzo Aduba, winner for supporting actress in a drama series

Winner: Uzo Aduba for drama supporting actress

 (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times)

(Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times)

Uzo Aduba of "Orange Is the New Black" wins the Emmy for supporting actress in a drama series.

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Allison Janney on her seventh Emmy

 (Yvonne Villarreal / Los Angeles Times)

(Yvonne Villarreal / Los Angeles Times)

Supporting actress in a comedy winner Allison Janney had lead actress winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus join her on stage in the press room.

"I just asked Julia to come up with me," said Janney. "I was feeling nervous. That was hard, to be the first award right out of the gate. We had just gone through that carpet; it was hot. I was just overwhelmed it happened and it was just so fast."

"This means a lot to me," said Janney on her win. "It's never bad to win an Emmy. It's extraordinary. I love 'Mom' the show. I love the issues we deal with."

Janney won her seventh Emmy tonight, putting her on a very short list of seven-time Emmy winners.

"I'm calling this one Ed" said Janney. "This Emmy is Ed ... Ed Asner and Mary Tyler Moore and me have won seven Emmys. Never in a million trillion years would I ever thought I would be on a list with them."

George Martin: Happy birthday, sir. And thank you for welcoming us into your dream.
David Benioff, winner with D.B. Weiss for "Game of Thrones," drama series writing

For those keeping score

Winner: 'Game of Thrones' for drama series writing

David Benioff and D.B. Weiss of "Game of Thrones" win the Emmy for writing for a drama series.

To everybody in television, I just want to tell you cling to it as long as you can...it is a barren wasteland out there.
Jon Stewart, winner for "The Daily Show," best variety talk series

Colin Hanks freaks us all out

Dang, did Colin Hanks just sound exactly like Tom Hanks or what? We should probably give him a break — he's had a rough day. Maybe he packed his real voice in that missing carry-on? Nice of Dad to help out with a loaner.

Winner: 'Daily Show' for variety talk series

 (Getty Images for Comedy Central)

(Getty Images for Comedy Central)

"The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" wins the Emmy for variety talk series.

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus on her win

 (Mark Davis/Getty Images)

(Mark Davis/Getty Images)

It's surprisingly nerve-racking. I was really nervous going up there. I was very, very moved to have won again. I was shocked.
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, lead actress in a comedy winner

'Inside Amy Schumer' wins first Emmy for variety sketch series

Thanks to a split enacted this year that separated variety talk series and variety sketch series into two separate Emmy categories, "Inside Amy Schumer" has won the first ever Emmy awarded for variety sketch series.

This is the second Emmy for "Inside Amy Schumer" with the show previously winning the Emmy for original music and lyrics for the song "Girl You Don't Need Makeup" featured in the episode "Cool With It".

To all the people I work with at The Daily Show, you guys are the best. This is for you.
Chuck O'Neil, winner for variety series directing

Winner: Chuck O'Neil for variety series directing

Chuck O'Neil of "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" wins the Emmy for directing for a variety series. He'd been nominated 12 consecutive times.

This show fights for what we believe in...thanks to everybody who has helped me and the girl who gave me sort of the smoky eye. I really like it.
Amy Schumer, winner for best variety sketch series

In the press room with 'The Voice'

Move over, "The Amazing Race": It's time for "The Voice" to shine. The team behind NBC's singing competition was all smiles in the press room after winning the reality competition category at the Emmys on Sunday.

"'The Voice' managed to reinvent music competitions with a level of kindness and dignity," said Mark Burnett, the show's executive producer, highlighting the coaches who include Blake Shelton, Adam Levine, Christina Aguilera, Pharrell and Gwen Stefani.

"The coaches get so personally invested in these people," Burnett said. "The contestants are working with artists they never thought they would meet."

Shelton has "most of them [former contestants] living in his house," host Carson Daly added.

Burnett said "The Voice" is successful because American viewers love tuning in to the 90 episodes per year.

"The American viewing public are super smart," Burnett said. "It's harder and harder to engage them when [a show is] running live. A show like 'The Voice' successfully does that. This is young America's favorite show. People just love it, and we love it. And these guys behind me make it."

Winner: 'Inside Amy Schumer' for variety sketch series

 (Ali Goldstein / Comedy Central)

(Ali Goldstein / Comedy Central)

"Inside Amy Schumer" wins the Emmy for variety sketch series.

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Winner: 'Daily Show' for variety series writing

Elliott Kalan, Adam Lowitt, Steve Bodow, Jon Stewart, Dan Amira, Travon Free, Hallie Haglund, Matt Koff, Dan McCoy, Jo Miller, Zhubin Parang, Daniel Radosh, Lauren Sarver, Owen Parsons and Delaney Yeager of "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" win the Emmy for writing for a variety series.

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It started as a book. OK, Andy?
Francis McDormand for "Olive Kitteridge," winner limited series

Winner: 'Olive Kitteridge' for limited series

Frances McDormand and Richard Jenkins in

Frances McDormand and Richard Jenkins in "Olive Kitteridge." (HBO)

HBO's critically lauded “Olive Kitteridge” has won the Emmy for limited series. The show, adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name, was a star-studded affair, starring Frances McDormand, Richard Jenkins, Bill Murray and Zoe Kazan, all of whom were Emmy-nominated for their efforts. The series was directed by Emmy-nominated Lisa Cholodenko.

The four part series aired on HBO in November 2014 and garnered 13 Emmy nominations overall.

Other contenders in the category included “American Crime” (ABC), “American Horror Story: Freak Show” (FX), “The Honorable Woman” (SundanceTV) and “Wolf Hall” (PBS).

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Breaking news from Emmys: TV shows end

Surely infuriating spoilerphobes everywhere, the Emmys just ran a tribute not to people lost in the past year, but television shows. The montage featured scenes from the conclusions of any number of shows, including "Two and a Half Men", "Parks & Recreation", "Mad Men" and "Boardwalk Empire."

Hope you weren't behind on any of those shows!

Just in from the 'you can't make people laugh' category

In an odd little remote bit, nominee Tatiana Maslany and Emmy winner Tony Hale are "caught" via some sort of surveillance cameras using metal detectors to hunt for treasure out on the abandoned red carpet, finally fighting over a can of beans that Maslany found and started shoving in her face. The gag continues right up until the moment security shoves them out of camera range.

The carpet's not so glamorous after the cameras are gone, Samberg observes.

Funny? Meh. No, not really.

Not really at all. Samberg, you're not going to make metal detectors happen.

I would like to thank the incredible women who made 'Olive Kitteridge' happen. And there's about 100,000 of them.
Richard Jenkins, winner of lead actor in a limited series or movie

Winner: Richard Jenkins for lead actor in a limited series or movie

 (Jojo Whilden/HBO)

(Jojo Whilden/HBO)

Richard Jenkins won the Emmy for lead actor in a limited series or movie for his role as Henry, a local pharmacist married to the titular character from HBO's miniseries "Olive Kitteridge."

Based on Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, the series follows Olive, a middle-school math teacher in the fictional small town of Crosby, Maine. The miniseries weaves together parts or wholes of about half the 13 interconnected stories from the novel.

The miniseries adaptation was nominated for a whopping 13 Emmys total, including limited series, lead actor in a limited series (Jenkins), supporting actor in a limited series (Bill Murray) and supporting actress in a limited series (Zoe Kazan). It already took home two creative Emmys for casting for a limited series, movie or a special and single-camera picture editing for a limited series or a movie.

Jenkins was up against David Oyelowo ("Nightingale"), Timothy Hutton ("American Crime"), Mark Rylance ("Wolf Hall"), Ricky Gervais ("Derek: The Final Chapter") and Adrien Brody ("Houdini").

A freebie? It's not TV — it's HBO

Never say Andy Samberg isn't a giver. ()

Never say Andy Samberg isn't a giver.

Too cheap to pay for HBO? Andy Samberg just did you all a solid, releasing his HBO Now logon to the Emmys viewing audience.

The login: Khaeelsifan3@EmmyHost.com.

The password: password1

Gotta get the number in the password "to throw 'em off," Samberg says.

The logon works, and yeah, it smells of paid promotional placement just like Ellen DeGeneres' Oscars selfie did — but that one was pretty fun too.

We are all here because of the power of a story well told. Sometimes, that's enough.
Frances McDormand, winner for actress in a limited series

Winner: Frances McDormand for lead actress in a limited series or movie

 (Jojo Whilden / HBO)

(Jojo Whilden / HBO)

Frances McDormand won the Emmy for lead actress in a limited series or movie for her role as the unsentimental title character from HBO's miniseries "Olive Kitteridge."

Based on Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, the series follows Kitteridge, a middle-school math teacher in the fictional small-town of Crosby, Maine.

The miniseries adaptation was nominated for a whopping 13 Emmys total, including best limited series, lead actor in a limited series (Richard Jenkins), supporting actor in a limited series (Bill Murray) and supporting actress in a limited series (Zoe Kazan). It already took home two creative Emmys for casting for a limited series, movie or a special and single-camera picture editing for a limited series or a movie.

McDormand was up against Felicity Huffman ("American Crime"), Maggie Gyllenhaal ("The Honorable Woman"), Queen Latifah ("Bessie"), Jessica Lange ("American Horror Story: Freak Show") and Emma Thompson ("Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" Live From Lincoln Center).

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Winner: Bill Murray for supporting actor in a limited series or movie

 (HBO)

(HBO)

Bill Murray of "Olive Kitteridge" wins the Emmy for supporting actress in a limited series or movie.

Regina King and Emmy history

With her win in supporting actress in a limited series, Regina King becomes the fifth African American actress in history to win the award.

The "American Crime" actress joins an elite group of victors, including Ruby Dee and Cicely Tyson, as well as Esther Rolle and Olivia Cole.

More on Amy Poehler

Although Amy Poehler has been nominated for lead actress in a comedy series Emmy for her role as Leslie Knope in "Parks and Recreation" six times, she has never won.

This four-hour movie was really sort of a metaphysical, supernatural, transpersonal, dark night of the soul experience.
Lisa Cholodenko, winner for limited series directing

Winner: Lisa Cholodenko for limited series or movie directing

Lisa Cholodenko of "Olive Kitteridge" wins the Emmy for directing for a limited series, movie or dramatic special.

To my sister, my amazing mother and grandmother, who have taught me the power and the blessing of being a woman.
Regina King, winner supporting actress in a limited series

Winner: Regina King for supporting actress in a limited series or movie

 (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

Regina King of "American Crime" wins the Emmy for supporting actress in a limited series or movie.

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We all face that horrible, horrible blank page and we are here and we sold our script. And isn't that remarkable?
Jane Anderson for limited series writing

Winner: 'Olive Kitteridge' for limited series or movie writing

Jane Anderson of "Olive Kitteridge" wins the Emmy for writing for a limited series, movie or dramatic special.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus is queen of the Emmys

Yes, Julia Louis-Dreyfus has won the Emmy for actress in a comedy for the fourth straight year, but did you know that she her dominance stretches far beyond that? The actress has been nominated in the category for nine of the last 10 years.

Louis-Dreyfus took only 2011 off, seeing nominations for all five years that "The New Adventures of Old Christine" ran from 2006-10 and for all four years (so far) of "Veep," beginning in 2012.

Amy Poehler will be OK

Meanwhile in the press room

Winner: 'The Voice' for reality competition series

Make it a duet: NBC's "The Voice" harmonized to its second Emmy as best reality-competition series.

The singing contest previously won the prize in 2013.

Through eight seasons so far, "The Voice" has become a linchpin of NBC's lineup as the network has zoomed from last to first place in the ratings. The show features dozens of aspiring singers vying for the attention of celebrity judges and coaches, including Blake Shelton, Adam Levine and Pharrell Williams.

Since the reality-competition prize was first bestowed in 2003, the category has been dominated by CBS' "The Amazing Race," which has won 10 times. Bravo's "Top Chef" and "The Voice" are the only other shows to have won.

What a great honor it must be for you to honor me tonight. Oh wait...Donald Trump said that. It's getting trickier and trickier to satirize this stuff.
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, winner for actress in a comedy series

Who's TV's best boss? It's up for debate

With so many nominees this year having worked for "Saturday Night Live" honcho Lorne Michaels along the way, Andy Samberg and Seth Meyers felt compelled to present him with a World's Best Boss mug. And a fine mug it was.

Alas, when it came to their World's Best Boss award , um, they gave that one to Shonda Rhimes.

At least Michaels got his gift hand-delivered to him in the audience.

Winner: Julia Louis-Dreyfus for lead comedy actress

Former vice president Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) is the leader of the free world in the fourth season of HBO's

Former vice president Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) is the leader of the free world in the fourth season of HBO's "Veep." (Patrick Harbron / HBO)

Four more years! Julia Louis-Dreyfus has won her fourth consecutive Emmy for lead actress in a comedy for her portrayal of foul-mouthed leader of the free world Selina Meyer on HBO's “Veep.” Only Helen Hunt on “Mad About You” has matched Louis-Dreyfus' feat of four acting wins in a row.

Louis-Dreyfus previously won Emmys for supporting actress in a comedy for “Seinfeld” and for lead actress in a comedy for “The New Adventures of Old Christine.”

“Veep” has been renewed for a fifth season by HBO.

Other contenders in the category included Edie Falco for “Nurse Jackie” (Showtime), Lisa Kudrow for “The Comeback” (HBO), Amy Poehler for “Parks and Recreation” (NBC), Amy Schumer for “Inside Amy Schumer” (Comedy Central) and Lily Tomlin for “Grace and Frankie” (Netflix).

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Jill Soloway just the third woman to win the Emmy for comedy directing

Jill Soloway won the Emmy for directing in a comedy series tonight for "Transparent" becoming just the third woman in history to do so.

Previous winners are Gail Mancuso for "Modern Family" (twice) and Betty Thomas for "Dream On."

I have been given the opportunity to act because people's lives depend on it.... I 'd like to dedicate my performance and this award to the transgender community.... Thank you for letting us be part of the change.
Jeffrey Tambor, winner for actor in a comedy series

Winner: Jeffrey Tambor for lead comedy actor

Actor Jeffrey Tambor (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times) ()

Actor Jeffrey Tambor (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Jeffrey Tambor has won the Emmy Award for lead actor in a comedy series for "Transparent," scoring a victory over several veteran performers.

Tambor has been heavily applauded for his role as transgender Maura Pfefferman in the Netflix series. He has been nominated twice before for an Emmy for playing George Bluth Jr. in "Arrested Development."

The actor for years has been one of Hollywood's busiest actors, jumping between films ("Meet Joe Black"), TV ("The Larry Sanders Show") and stage ("Glengarry Glen Ross"). He has also provided voices for several animated films, including "Monsters vs. Aliens" and "The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie."

The other contenders for the award were Anthony Anderson ("black-ish"), Don Cheadle ("House of Lies"), Matt LeBlanc ("Episodes"), Louis C.K. ("Louie"), Will Forte ("The Last Man on Earth") and William H. Macy ("Shameless").

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We don't have a trans tipping point yet. We have a trans civil rights problem.
Jill Soloway, winner for comedy directing

Winner: Jill Soloway for comedy directing

Jill Soloway of "Transparent" wins the Emmy for directing for a comedy series.

I just had a fear my zipper's down.
Tony Hale, winner for supporting actor in a comedy

Winner: Tony Hale for comedy supporting actor

 (Associated Press)

(Associated Press)

Tony Hale of "Veep" wins the Emmy for supporting actor in a comedy series.

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Allison Janney's Emmy prowess

Allison Janney won her seventh Emmy tonight, this time for outstanding supporting actress in a comedy for CBS' "Mom."

The actress has been nominated nine times total, but perhaps most impressive is the fact that she's won Emmys in four acting categories. In addition to supporting actress in a comedy, Janney has conquered supporting actress in a drama; lead actress in a drama, both for "The West Wing"; and guest actress in a drama for "Masters of Sex."

From inside the Microsoft Theater

So many lives are touched by addiction; it is a privilege to work on a show that reminds us there is hope, lots of hope.
Allison Janney, winner for supporting actress in a comedy

Winner: 'Veep' for comedy series writing

Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci and Tony Roche of "Veep" win the Emmy for writing for a comedy series.

Andy Samberg confirms Amy Schumer is funny

Samberg had a a solid opening monologue, but few jokes were as good as his quip about Amy Schumer, in which he mused that Amy was funny "for a person," tweaking all those individuals who love saying that women aren't funny.

Winner: Allison Janney for supporting actress in a comedy

 (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Allison Janney wins the Emmy for supporting actress in a comedy series for her role on "Mom." It's her seventh Emmy.

Donald Trump is everywhere

You knew there'd be a joke about Donald Trump, and it came early on.

"Well, Donald Trump seems racist ...," Samberg said in his opening monologue.

And, um, that was pretty much the whole joke. People laughed.

Andy Samberg talks about some changes in this year's Emmy classifications: "Orange Is the New Black" has gone from comedy to drama, while "Louie" is now jazz.

People who watch the first show nod. Those who watch the second one laugh.

Samberg's opening musical number

It looks like Andy Samberg is weighing in on the concept of "Peak TV" with the Emmys opening ceremony, singing a song about how it's impossible to keep up with all of the best show's on television.

It's shades of Samberg's digital shorts with Lonely Island on "SNL" and a great encapsulation of how difficult it is to be a TV fan. All in all, one of the best award show opening numbers in recent memory.

Final touches for Andy Samberg

As the host's prerecorded introduction number kicks off the Emmys, the man himself gets ready to go on.

 (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Hey Andy Samberg ... I realize it's late, but here are a few things that would be great to see.
Mary McNamara

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OK, here are Glenn Whipp's predictions

He, for one, is calling it for Jon Hamm (sort of: "No member of 'Mad Men's' impeccable ensemble has ever won an Emmy. And the show's final season generated more think pieces than viewers. So if, say, Kevin Spacey's name is read, don't be shocked. (Be angry. But don't be shocked.) And "Game of Thrones."

 ()

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Armisen pays homage to Wes Craven on red carpet

Though Wes Craven died on Aug. 30, he's not forgotten at tonight's 67th Emmy red carpet. Actor and comedian Fred Armisen appeared tonight wearing both a Freddy Krueger-inspired tie and coordinating bladed glove. Krueger is Craven's most famous creation, star of the "Nightmare on Elm Street" series.

If nothing else, it should keep fellow Emmy attendees on their toes, as no one will want to be caught napping with the threat of Freddy lurking.

Selfie sticks prohibited

 (Frazer Harrison / Getty Images)

(Frazer Harrison / Getty Images)

Ricky Gervais takes a selfie the only way a person can take a selfie at the Emmys: with his arm outstretched. Selfie sticks are banned at the event "due to safety concerns."

Emmys red carpet trends

Taylor Schilling arrives at the 67th Primetime Emmy Awards (Jordan Strauss / Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Taylor Schilling arrives at the 67th Primetime Emmy Awards (Jordan Strauss / Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Claire Danes in Prada

 (Frazer Harrison / Getty Images)

(Frazer Harrison / Getty Images)

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